East Siang district

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A landscape in East Siang

East Siang district
Location of East Siang district in Arunachal Pradesh
Location of East Siang district in Arunachal Pradesh
CountryIndia
StateArunachal Pradesh
Government
 • Lok Sabha constituenciesNinong Ering
 • Vidhan Sabha constituenciesTatung Jamoh, Kaling Moyong, Tapang Taloh
Area
 • Total4,005 km2 (1,546 sq mi)
Population
 (2011)
 • Total99,214[1] (2,011)
 • Urban
Yes
Demographics
 • Literacy73.5%[1]
 • Sex ratio962[1]
Time zoneUTC+05:30 (IST)
Major highwaysNH-52
Websiteeastsiang.nic.in

East Siang (Pron:/ˈsjæŋ or ˈsɪæŋ/) is an administrative district in the state of Arunachal Pradesh in India.

History[edit]

In 1989 territory was transferred from West Siang district to East Siang.[2] A decade later, in 1999, the district was bifurcated to make Upper Siang district.[2]East Siang district has a long ancient history related with the Chutiya Kingdom. It was probably under Chutiya chieftain rule from a long time, and came under Birpal's rule in the 12th century.

Geography[edit]

The district headquarters are located at Pasighat. East Siang district occupies an area of 4,005 square kilometres (1,546 sq mi),[3] comparatively equivalent to Indonesia's Nias Island.[4]

Divisions[edit]

There are 5 Arunachal Pradesh Legislative Assembly constituencies located in this district: Panging, Nari-Koyu, Pasighat West, Pasighat East, and Mebo. All of these are part of Arunachal East Lok Sabha constituency.[5]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
YearPop.±% p.a.
196132,421—    
197133,138+0.22%
198155,170+5.23%
199171,864+2.68%
200187,397+1.98%
201199,214+1.28%
source:[6]

According to the 2011 census East Siang district has a population of 99,214,[7] roughly equal to the nation of Kiribati.[8] This gives it a ranking of 615th in India (out of a total of 640).[7] The district has a population density of 27 inhabitants per square kilometre (70/sq mi) .[7] Its population growth rate over the decade 2001–2011 was 13.3%.[7] East Siang has a sex ratio of 962 females for every 1000 males,[7] and a literacy rate of 73.54%.[7]

Various tribal groups of the Adi people live in various parts of the district. The local people traditionally follow Donyi-Polo, although a sizeable minority have converted to Christianity.

Languages[edit]

Predominant Language spoken in pasighat is Adi language of the Sino-Tibetan tongue with approximately 140 000 speakers, written in Latin scripts;[9] and Galo, an endangered language with 30 000 speakers, also in the Sino-Tibetan language family.[10]

Flora and fauna[edit]

East siaing dietrict
East siaing dietrict

In 1978 East Siang district became home to the D’Ering Memorial (Lali) Wildlife Sanctuary, which has an area of 190 km2 (73.4 sq mi).[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "District Census 2011". Census2011.co.in.
  2. ^ a b Law, Gwillim (25 September 2011). "Districts of India". Statoids. Retrieved 11 October 2011.
  3. ^ Srivastava, Dayawanti et al. (ed.) (2010). "States and Union Territories: Arunachal Pradesh: Government". India 2010: A Reference Annual (54th ed.). New Delhi, India: Additional Director General, Publications Division, Ministry of Information and Broadcasting (India), Government of India. p. 1113. ISBN 978-81-230-1617-7.CS1 maint: extra text: authors list (link)
  4. ^ "Island Directory Tables: Islands by Land Area". United Nations Environment Program. 18 February 1998. Retrieved 11 October 2011. Nias 4,048km2
  5. ^ "Assembly Constituencies allocation w.r.t District and Parliamentary Constituencies". Chief Electoral Officer, Arunachal Pradesh website. Archived from the original on 13 August 2011. Retrieved 21 March 2011.
  6. ^ Decadal Variation In Population Since 1901
  7. ^ a b c d e f "District Census 2011". Census2011.co.in. 2011. Retrieved 30 September 2011.
  8. ^ US Directorate of Intelligence. "Country Comparison:Population". Retrieved 1 October 2011. Kiribati 100,743 July 2011 est.
  9. ^ M. Paul Lewis, ed. (2009). "Adi: A language of India". Ethnologue: Languages of the World (16th ed.). Dallas, Texas: SIL International. Retrieved 28 September 2011.
  10. ^ M. Paul Lewis, ed. (2009). "Galo: A language of India". Ethnologue: Languages of the World (16th ed.). Dallas, Texas: SIL International. Retrieved 28 September 2011.
  11. ^ Indian Ministry of Forests and Environment. "Protected areas: Arunachal Pradesh". Archived from the original on 23 August 2011. Retrieved 25 September 2011.

External links[edit]