FDGB-Pokal

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FDGB-Pokal
Founded 1949
Abolished 1991
Region East Germany
Number of teams Various
Last champions Hansa Rostock
(1st title)
Most successful club(s) Dynamo Dresden
FC Magdeburg
(7 titles)
The last version of the FDGB Cup 1990

The FDGB-Pokal (Freier Deutscher Gewerkschaftsbund Pokal or Free German Trade Union Federation Cup) was an elimination football tournament held annually in the former East Germany. It was the second most important national title in East German football after the DDR-Oberliga championship. The founder of the competition was East Germany's major trade union.

History[edit]

The inaugural FDGB Pokal (generally referred to in English as the East German Cup) was contested in 1949, four years before the initial DFB-Pokal was played in the western half of the country. The first national cup competition had been the Tschammerpokal introduced in 1935.

Each football club which participated in the East German football league system was entitled to enter the tournament. Clubs from the lower leagues played in regional qualification rounds, with the winners joining the teams of the DDR-Oberliga and DDR-Liga in the main round of the tournament of the following year. Each elimination was determined by a single game held on the ground of one of the two participating teams.

Until the mid-80s the field of competition was made up of as many as sixty teams playing in five rounds due to the large number of eligible clubs in the country. Beginning in 1975 the final was held each year in the Berliner Stadion der Weltjugend (Berlin's Stadium for World Youth) and drew anywhere from 30,000 to 55,000 spectators. The last cup final, played in 1991 after the fall of the Berlin Wall, was a 1–0 victory by Hansa Rostock over Stahl Eisenhüttenstadt, which drew a crowd of only 4,800.

The most successful side in 42 years of competition was 1. FC Magdeburg which celebrated seven FDGB Cup wins (including those as SC Aufbau Magdeburg before 1965); one of those wins ultimately led to victory in the UEFA Cup Winners' Cup 1973-74.

The only winners of the competition to reach the final of the DFB-Pokal since the re-unification of the country are 1. FC Union Berlin, who appeared in the 2001 German Cup final, but lost 0–2 to Schalke. To date the only other former East German club to appear in the German Cup final is Energie Cottbus.

Finals[edit]

FDGB Cup 1955
FDGB Cup 1962
FDGB Cup 1974
The design 1979 - 1985
Season Winner Score Runner-up
1949
Waggonbau Dessau
1–0
Gera Süd
1949–50
EHW Thale
4–0
BSG KWU Erfurt
1950–51
No competition held in that season.
1951–52
Volkspolizei Dresden
3–0
Einheit Pankow
1952–53
Not finished due to the events around the Uprising of 1953 in East Germany.
1953–54
ASK Vorwärts Berlin
2–1
Motor Zwickau
1954–55
Wismut Karl-Marx-Stadt
3–2 (a.e.t.)
Empor Rostock
1955
No competition due to the transition from a fall-spring to spring-fall schedule.
1956
Hallescher FC Chemie
2–1
ASK Vorwärts Berlin
1957
SC Lokomotive Leipzig
2–1 (a.e.t.)
Empor Rostock
1958
SC Einheit Dresden
2–1 (a.e.t.)
SC Lokomotive Leipzig
1959
Dynamo Berlin
0–0 (a.e.t.) / 3–2 (R)
Wismut Karl-Marx-Stadt
1960
Motor Jena
3–2 (a.e.t.)
Empor Rostock
1961
No competition due to the transition from a spring-fall to fall-spring schedule.
1961–62
Hallescher FC Chemie
3–1
Dynamo Berlin
1962–63
Motor Zwickau
3–0
Chemie Zeitz
1963–64
FC Magdeburg
3–2
SC Leipzig
1964–65
FC Magdeburg
2–1
Motor Jena
1965–66
Chemie Leipzig
1–0
FC Lok Stendal
1966–67
Motor Zwickau
3–0
Hansa Rostock
1967–68
FC Union Berlin
2–1
Carl Zeiss Jena
1968–69
FC Magdeburg
4–0
FC Karl-Marx-Stadt
1969–70
FC Vorwärts Berlin
4–2
FC Lokomotive Leipzig
1970–71
Dynamo Dresden
2–1 (a.e.t.)
Berliner FC Dynamo
1971–72
Carl Zeiss Jena
2–1
Dynamo Dresden
1972–73
FC Magdeburg
3–2
FC Lokomotive Leipzig
1973–74
Carl Zeiss Jena
3–1 (a.e.t.)
Dynamo Dresden
1974–75
Sachsenring Zwickau
2–2 (a.e.t.) (4–3 p)
Dynamo Dresden
1975–76
FC Lokomotive Leipzig
3–0
FC Vorwärts Frankfurt
1976–77
Dynamo Dresden
3–2
FC Lokomotive Leipzig
1977–78
FC Magdeburg
1–0
Dynamo Dresden
1978–79
FC Magdeburg
1–0 (a.e.t.)
Berliner FC Dynamo
1979–80
Carl Zeiss Jena
3–1 (a.e.t.)
FC Rot-Weiß Erfurt
1980–81
FC Lokomotive Leipzig
4–1
FC Vorwärts Frankfurt
1981–82
Dynamo Dresden
1–1 (a.e.t.) (5–4 p)
Berliner FC Dynamo
1982–83
FC Magdeburg
4–0
FC Karl-Marx-Stadt
1983–84
Dynamo Dresden
2–1
Berliner FC Dynamo
1984–85
Dynamo Dresden
3–2
Berliner FC Dynamo
1985–86
FC Lokomotive Leipzig
5–1
FC Union Berlin
1986–87
FC Lokomotive Leipzig
4–1
Hansa Rostock
1987–88
Berliner FC Dynamo
2–0 (a.e.t.)
Carl Zeiss Jena
1988–89
Berliner FC Dynamo
1–0
FC Karl-Marx-Stadt
1989–90
Dynamo Dresden
2–1
Dynamo Schwerin
1990–91
Hansa Rostock
1–0
Eisenhüttenstädter FC Stahl

Performances[edit]

Performance by club[edit]

The performance of various clubs is shown in the following table: [1]

Club Winners Runners-up Semi-finalists Winning Years
Dynamo Dresden
7
4
6
1952, 1971, 1977, 1982, 1984, 1985, 1990
FC Magdeburg
7
3
1964, 1965, 1969, 1973, 1978, 1979, 1983
FC Lokomotive Leipzig 1
4
4
6
1976, 1981, 1986, 1987
Carl Zeiss Jena 2
4
3
8
1960, 1972, 1974, 1980
FSV Zwickau 3
3
1
5
1963, 1967, 1975
Berliner FC Dynamo
2
5
5
1988, 1989
Vorwärts Berlin 4
2
3
8
1954, 1970
Chemie Leipzig 5
2
1
1957, 1966
Hallescher FC 6
2
5
1956, 1962
Hansa Rostock 7
1
5
4
1991
Wismut Karl-Marx-Stadt 8
1
1
4
1955
Dynamo Berlin
1
1
2
1959
FC Union Berlin
1
1
1
1968
Waggonbau Dessau
1
1949
EHW Thale
1
1950
Dresdner SC
1
1958
FC Karl-Marx-Stadt
3
5
FC Rot-Weiß Erfurt 9
2
6
Chemie Zeitz
1
1
FC Lok Stendal
1
1
Gera Süd
1
Einheit Pankow
1
Dynamo Schwerin
1
Eisenhüttenstädter FC Stahl
1
Energie Cottbus
3
Empor Wurzen-West
2
Fortuna Babelsberg
1
ZSG Burg
1
Motor West Karl-Marx-Stadt
1
Lokomotive Weimar
1
Stahl Brandenburg
1

Notes:

  • 1 Also known as SC Rotation Leipzig and SC Leipzig. (not to be confused with SC Lokomotive Leipzig)
  • 2 Also known as Motor Jena.
  • 3 Also known as SG Planitz, Horch Zwickau, Motor Zwickau and Sachsenring Zwickau.
  • 4 In 1953, the club was picked up from Leipzig and moved to East Berlin to play as ZSK Vorwärts Berlin, later ASK Vorwärts Berlin and after FC Vorwärts Berlin. In 1971, the club was picked up and moved again, this time from the capital to Frankfurt (Oder), Brandenburg. The team was known as FC Vorwärts Frankfurt.
  • 5 Also known as FC Sachsen Leipzig and SC Lokomotive Leipzig. (not to be confused with 1. FC Lokomotive Leipzig)
  • 6 Also known as SG Freiimfelde Halle and Hallescher FC Chemie.
  • 7 Also known as Empor Rostock.
  • 8 Also known as SG Aue, BSG Pneumatik Aue, Zentra Wismut Aue. In 1954 the team moved from Aue to Chemnitz (known from 1953 to 1990 as Karl-Marx-Stadt). After German reunification in 1990, the club was renamed FC Wismut Aue before taking on its current name, FC Erzgebirge Aue in 1993.
  • 9 Also known as BSG KWU Erfurt, Fortuna Erfurt, Turbine Erfurt. In 1966, SC Turbine Erfurt and BSG Optima Erfurt were merged under the name FC Rot-Weiß Erfurt.

Performance by city or town[edit]

City / Town Winners Club(s)
Dresden
8
Dynamo Dresden (7), Dresdner SC (1)
Magdeburg
7
1. FC Magdeburg (7)
Berlin
6
Berliner FC Dynamo (2), Vorwärts Berlin (2), Dynamo Berlin (1), Union Berlin (1)
Leipzig
6
Lokomotive Leipzig (4), Chemie Leipzig (2)
Jena
4
Carl Zeiss Jena (4)
Zwickau
3
Motor / Sachsenring Zwickau (3)
Halle (Saale)
2
Hallescher FC (2)
Chemnitz
1
Wismut Karl-Marx-Stadt (1)
Dessau
1
Waggonbau Dessau (1)
Rostock
1
Hansa Rostock (1)
Thale
1
EHW Thale (1)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]