FIFA Women's World Cup records

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This is a list of records of the FIFA Women's World Cup and its qualification matches.

General statistics by tournament[edit]

Year Host Champion Winning coach Winning captain Top scorer(s) Best player award[1]
1991  China United States United States United States Anson Dorrance United States April Heinrichs United States Michelle Akers (10) United States Carin Jennings
1995  Sweden Norway Norway Norway Even Pellerud Norway Gro Espeseth Norway Ann-Kristin Aarønes (6) Norway Hege Riise
1999  United States United States United States United States Tony DiCicco United States Carla Overbeck Brazil Sissi (7)
China Sun Wen (7)
China Sun Wen
2003  United States Germany Germany Germany Tina Theune Germany Bettina Wiegmann Germany Birgit Prinz (7) Germany Birgit Prinz
2007  China Germany Germany Germany Silvia Neid Germany Birgit Prinz Brazil Marta (7) Brazil Marta
2011  Germany Japan Japan Japan Norio Sasaki Japan Homare Sawa Japan Homare Sawa (5) Japan Homare Sawa
2015  Canada United States United States United States Jill Ellis United States Christie Rampone Germany Célia Šašić (6)
United States Carli Lloyd (6)
United States Carli Lloyd

Teams: tournament position[edit]

Teams having equal quantities in the tables below are ordered by the tournament the quantity was attained in (the teams that attained the quantity first are listed first). If the quantity was attained by more than one team in the same tournament, these teams are ordered alphabetically.

Most titles won
3, United States United States (1991, 1999, 2015).
Most finishes in the top two
4, United States United States (1991, 1999, 2011, 2015).
Most finishes in the top three
7, United States United States (every tournament).
Most finishes in the top four
7, United States United States (every tournament).
Most finishes in the top eight
7, Germany Germany, United States United States (every tournament).
Most World Cup appearances
7, Brazil Brazil, Germany Germany, Japan Japan, Nigeria Nigeria, Norway Norway, Sweden Sweden, United States United States.
For a detailed list, see National team appearances in the FIFA Women's World Cup.
Most third-place finishes
3, United States United States (1995, 2003, 2007).
Most fourth-place finishes
2, Germany Germany (1991, 2015), Norway Norway (1999, 2007).
Most 3rd-4th-place finishes
3, United States United States (1995, 2003, 2007).
Most 5th-8th-place finishes
4, China China (1991, 2003, 2007, 2015).
Most 9th-16th-place finishes
6, Nigeria Nigeria (every tournament except 1999).

Consecutive[edit]

Most consecutive championships
2, Germany Germany (2003–2007).
Most consecutive finishes in the top two
2, Norway Norway (1991–1995); Germany Germany (2003–2007); Japan Japan (2011-2015); United States United States (2011-2015).
Most consecutive finishes in the top three
7, United States United States (1991–2015).
Most consecutive finishes in the top four
7, United States United States (1991–2015).
Most consecutive finishes in the top eight
7, Germany Germany, United States United States (1991–2015).
Most consecutive appearances in the finals
7, Brazil Brazil, Germany Germany, Japan Japan, Nigeria Nigeria, Norway Norway, Sweden Sweden, United States United States (1991–2015).
Most consecutive championships by a confederation
2, UEFA (2003–2007).

Gaps[edit]

Longest gap between successive titles
16 years, United States United States (1999–2015).
Longest gap between successive appearances in the top two
12 years, United States United States (1999–2011).
Longest gap between successive appearances in the top three
12 years, Sweden Sweden (1991–2003).
Longest gap between successive appearances in the top four
12 years, Sweden Sweden (1991–2003).
Longest gap between successive appearances in the top eight
16 years, Japan Japan (1995–2011).
Longest gap between successive appearances in the finals
16 years: New Zealand New Zealand (1991-2007).

Host team[edit]

Best finish by host team
Champion: United States United States (1999).
Worst finish by host team
Quarterfinals: China China (1991), Sweden Sweden (1995), China China (2007), Germany Germany (2011), Canada Canada (2015).

Defending champion[edit]

Best finish by defending champion
Champion: Germany Germany (2007).
Worst finish by defending champion
Quarterfinals: Germany Germany (2011).

Debuting teams[edit]

Best finish by a debuting team
Champion: United States United States (1991).

Other[edit]

Most finishes in the top two without ever being champion
1,  China PR (1999),  Sweden (2003),  Brazil (2007).
Most finishes in the top three without ever being champion
3,  Sweden (1991, 2003, 2011).
Most finishes in the top four without ever being champion
3,  Sweden (1991, 2003, 2011).
Most finishes in the top eight without ever being champion
6,  China PR (1991-2007, 2015).
Most appearances without ever being champion
7,  Brazil,  Nigeria,  Sweden (every tournament).
Most finishes in the top four without ever finishing in the top two
1,  Canada (2003);  France (2011);  England (2015).
Most finishes in the top eight without ever finishing in the top two
4,  England (1995, 2007-2015).
Most appearances without ever finishing in the top two
7,  Nigeria (every tournament).
Most finishes in the top eight without ever finishing in the top four
3,  Australia (2007-2015).
Most appearances without ever finishing in the top four
7,  Nigeria (every tournament).
Most appearances without ever finishing in the top eight
4,  New Zealand, (1991, 2007-2015).
Teams that overcame tournament champion
 England, 2011 (2–0 vs Japan).
Most played final
2,  Japan vs  United States (2011, 2015).

Players: tournament position[edit]

Qualification: at least one appearance in each Finals tournament.

Most finishes in the top two[edit]

Player Nation Tournament Apps Games Apps Games App %
Sandra Minnert  Germany 1995 2 6 11 18 61
2003 6 6
2007 3 6
Birgit Prinz  Germany 1995 6 6 18 18 100
2003 6 6
2007 6 6
Sandra Smisek  Germany 1995 1 6 8 18 44
2003 1 6
2007 6 6
Christie Rampone  United States 1999 1 6 9 19 47
2011 6 6
2015 2 7

Most finishes in the top three[edit]

Player Nation Tournament Apps Games Apps Games App %
Kristine Lilly  United States 1991 6 6 30 30 100
1995 6 6
1999 6 6
2003 6 6
2007 6 6
Christie Rampone  United States 1999 1 6 19 31 61
2003 4 6
2007 6 6
2011 6 6
2015 2 7

Most finishes in the top four[edit]

Player Nation Tournament Apps Games Apps Games App %
Kristine Lilly  United States 1991 6 6 30 30 100
1995 6 6
1999 6 6
2003 6 6
2007 6 6
Christie Rampone  United States 1999 1 6 19 31 61
2003 4 6
2007 6 6
2011 6 6
2015 2 7

Most finishes in the top eight[edit]

Player Nation Tournament Apps Games Apps Games App %
Kristine Lilly  United States 1991 6 6 30 30 100
1995 6 6
1999 6 6
2003 6 6
2007 6 6
Bente Nordby  Norway 1991 0 6 22 28 78
1995 6 6
1999 6 6
2003 4 4
2007 6 6
Birgit Prinz  Germany 1995 6 6 24 26 92
1999 4 4
2003 6 6
2007 6 6
2011 2 4
Nadine Angerer  Germany 1999 0 4 17 27 62
2003 0 6
2007 6 6
2011 4 4
2015 7 7
Christie Rampone  United States 1999 1 6 19 31 61
2003 4 6
2007 6 6
2011 6 6
2015 2 7

Coaches: tournament position[edit]

Most championships
1, Anson Dorrance (United States United States, 1991), Even Pellerud (Norway Norway, 1995), Tony DiCicco (United States United States, 1999), Tina Theune (Germany Germany, 2003), Silvia Neid (Germany Germany, 2007), Norio Sasaki (Japan Japan, 2011), Jill Ellis (United States United States, 2015).
Most finishes in the top two
2, Even Pellerud (Norway Norway, 1991-1995); Norio Sasaki (Japan Japan, 2011-2015).
Most finishes in the top three
2, Even Pellerud (Norway Norway, 1991-1995); Tony DiCicco (United States United States, 1995-1999); Norio Sasaki (Japan Japan, 2011-2015).
Most finishes in the top four
3, Even Pellerud (Norway Norway, 1991, 1995; Canada Canada, 2003)

Teams: matches played and goals scored[edit]

All time[edit]

Most matches played
43,[2]  United States.
Most wins
33,[2]  United States.
Most losses
16,  Nigeria.
Most draws
6,  China PR;  United States.
Most matches played without a win or a draw
6,  Argentina.
Most matches played without a win
12,  New Zealand.
Most matches played until first win
9,  Australia.
Most matches played until first draw
17,  Norway.
Most matches played until first loss
10,  United States.
Most goals scored
112,[3]  United States.
Most hat-tricks scored
5,  Germany.
Most goals conceded
56,[4]  Nigeria.
Most hat-tricks conceded
4,  Mexico.
Fewest goals scored
1,  Ecuador.
Fewest goals conceded
4,  Cameroon;  Costa Rica;  Netherlands;  Spain.
Highest goal difference
+77,  United States.
Lowest goal difference
-38,  Nigeria.
Highest average of goals scored per match
2.84,  Germany.
Highest average of goals conceded per match
5.66,  Ecuador.
Most meetings between two teams
5 times,  United States vs  Sweden (3–1–1) (1991, 2003, 2007, 2011, 2015).
Most tournaments unbeaten
3,  United States (1991, 1999, 2015).

In one tournament[edit]

Most wins
6,  United States, 1991;  Norway, 1995;  Germany, 2003;  Japan, 2015;  United States, 2015.
Fewest wins, champions
4,  Japan, 2011 (out of 6).
Most losses, champions
1, Japan Japan, 2011.
Most goals scored
25,  United States, 1991;  Germany, 2003.
Most goals scored, champions
25,  United States, 1991;  Germany, 2003.
Most goals scored, hosts
18,  United States, 1999.
Most goals scored, eliminated in the first round
7,  Japan, 2003;  Canada, 2007.
Fewest goals scored, champions
12,  Japan, 2011.
Fewest goals scored, hosts
4,  Canada, 2015.
Most goals conceded, champions
6,  Japan, 2011.
Most goals conceded, hosts
7,  China PR, 2007.
Fewest goals conceded, champions
0,  Germany, 2007.
Fewest goals conceded, hosts
3,  United States, 1999;  Canada, 2015.
Fewest goals conceded, eliminated in the first round
2,  Nigeria, 2011;
Most minutes without conceding a goal
540 minutes,  Germany, 2007;  United States, 2015.
Highest goal difference
+22,  Norway, 1995.
Highest goal difference, champions
+22,  Norway, 1995.
Highest goal difference, hosts
+15,  United States, 1999.
Lowest goal difference
-17,  Argentina, 2007.
Lowest goal difference, champions
+6,  Japan, 2011.
Lowest goal difference, hosts
-2,  China PR, 2007.
Highest average of goals scored per match
4.16,  United States, 1991;  Germany, 2003.
Highest average of goals scored per match, champions
4.16,  United States, 1991;  Germany, 2003.
Lowest average of goals scored per match
0.00, 6 teams.
Lowest average of goals scored per match, champions
2.00,  Japan, 2011;  United States, 2015.
Highest average of goals conceded per match
6.00,  Argentina, 2007.
Highest average of goals conceded per match, champions
1.00,  Japan, 2011.
Lowest average of goals conceded per match
0.00,  Germany, 2007.
Lowest average of goals conceded per match, champions
0.00,  Germany, 2007.

Streaks[edit]

Most consecutive successful qualification attempts without automatic spots
7, Brazil Brazil, Japan Japan, Nigeria Nigeria, Norway Norway (1991–2015).
Most consecutive wins
10,[5]  Norway, from 8–0 vs Nigeria (1995) to 3–1 vs Sweden (1999).
Most consecutive matches without a loss
15,  Germany, from 4–1 vs Canada (2003) to 4–2 vs France (2011).
Most consecutive losses
6,  Argentina, from 0–6 vs Japan (2003) to 1–6 vs England (2007).
Most consecutive draws
3,  Sweden, from 3–3 vs Nigeria (2015) to 1–1 vs Australia (2015).
Most consecutive matches without a draw
17,  Norway, from 0–4 vs China (1991) to 0–5 vs China (1999).
Most consecutive Top-scoring team
2,  Germany (2003–2007).
Most consecutive matches scoring at least one goal
15,[6]  Norway (1991–1999).
Most consecutive matches scoring at least five goals
2,  United States (1991).
Most consecutive matches without conceding a goal (clean sheets)
6,  Germany (2007).
Most consecutive minutes without conceding a goal
671 minutes,  Germany (2003-2011).
Most consecutive matches conceding at least three goals
4,  New Zealand (1991–2007);  Argentina (2003–2007).
Most consecutive matches conceding at least four goals
3,  Australia (1995);  Ghana (2007).
Most consecutive matches conceding at least six goals
2,  Mexico (1999);  Argentina (2003–2007);  Ecuador (2015).

Individual[edit]

Most tournaments played
6,[7] Formiga ( Brazil, 1995–2015); Homare Sawa ( Japan, 1995–2015).
Most tournaments in squad
6, Formiga ( Brazil, 1995–2015); Homare Sawa ( Japan, 1995–2015).
See here for a list of players who have appeared in multiple FIFA Women's World Cups.
Most championships
2,[8] 20 players.
See here for a list of players who have won multiple FIFA Women's World Cups.
Most medals
5, Kristine Lilly ( United States, 1991–2007); Christie Rampone ( United States, 1999–2015).
Most appearances in All-Star Team
2, 10 players.[9]
Most matches played, finals
30,[7] Kristine Lilly ( United States, 1991–2007).
Most knockout games played, finals
15, Kristine Lilly ( United States, 1991–2007).
Most minutes played, finals
2,537 minutes, Kristine Lilly ( United States, 1991–2007).
Most matches won
24, Kristine Lilly ( United States, 1991–2007).
Most matches draw
5, Sun Wen ( China PR, 1991–2003).
Most matches lost
10, Florence Omagbemi ( Nigeria, 1991–2003).
Most appearances in a World Cup final
3,[8] Birgit Prinz ( Germany, 1995, 2003, 2007).
Most appearances as captain
16, Sun Wen ( China PR, 1995–2003).
Most tournaments as captain
3, Florence Omagbemi ( Nigeria, 1995–2003); Sun Wen ( China PR, 1995–2003); Christine Sinclair ( Canada, 2007–2015).
Most appearances as substitute
8, Tiffeny Milbrett ( United States, 1995–2003); Zhang Ouying ( China PR, 1999–2007).
Youngest player
16 years, 34 days,[10] Ifeanyi Chiejine ( Nigeria), vs North Korea, 20 June 1999.
Youngest player, final
17 years, 236 days, Birgit Prinz ( Germany), vs Norway, 18 June 1995.
Youngest captain
19 years, 261 days, Nkiru Okosieme ( Nigeria), vs Germany, 17 November 1991.
Oldest player
40 years, 11 days, Christie Rampone ( United States), vs Japan, 5 July 2015.
Oldest player, final
40 years, 11 days,[11] Christie Rampone ( United States), vs Japan, 5 July 2015.
Oldest captain
37 years, 334 days, Sandrine Soubeyrand ( France), vs Sweden, 16 July 2011.
Oldest player to debut in a World Cup finals tournament
35 years, 320 days, Meg ( Brazil), vs Japan, 17 November 1991.
Largest age difference on the same team
22 years, 65 days, 1995,  Brazil (Meg: 39 years, 157 days; Formiga: 17 years, 92 days).
Largest age difference on a champion team
18 years, 61 days, 2011,  Japan (Nozomi Yamago: 36 years, 182 days; Mana Iwabuchi: 18 years, 121 days).
Longest period between World Cup finals appearances as a player
16 years, Wendi Henderson ( New Zealand, 1991–2007).
Longest span of World Cup finals appearances as a player
20 years, Formiga ( Brazil, 1995–2015); Homare Sawa ( Japan, 1995–2015).

Goalscoring[edit]

Individual[edit]

Most goals scored, overall finals
15,[7] Marta ( Brazil, 2003–2015).
For a detailed list of the overall top goalscorers, see List of FIFA Women's World Cup goalscorers.
Most goals scored in a tournament
10, Michelle Akers ( United States, 1991).
For a detailed list of top goalscorers in each tournament (Golden Boot winner), see Golden Boot.
Most goals scored in a match
5,[12] Michelle Akers ( United States), vs Chinese Taipei, 1991.
Most goals scored in a lost match
2, Genoveva Añonma ( Equatorial Guinea), vs Australia, 2011.
Most goals scored in a final match
3, Carli Lloyd ( United States) vs Japan, 2015.
Most goals scored in all final matches
3, Carli Lloyd ( United States), 3 vs Japan in 2015.
Most matches with at least one goal
12, Abby Wambach ( United States, 2003–2015).
Most consecutive matches with at least one goal
5, Birgit Prinz ( Germany, 2003).
Most matches with at least two goals
5, Marta ( Brazil, 2003–2011).
Most consecutive matches with at least two goals
2, 5 players.
Fastest hat-trick
5 minutes, Fabienne Humm (  Switzerland), scored at 47', 49' and 52', vs Ecuador, 2015.[13]
Fastest hat-trick from kickoff
16th minute, Carli Lloyd ( United States), scored at 3', 5' and 16', vs Japan, 2015.[14]
Most tournaments with at least one goal
4, 9 players.
Most tournaments with at least two goals
4, Mia Hamm ( United States, 1991–2003); Bettina Wiegmann ( Germany, 1991–2003).
Most tournaments with at least three goals
3, Bettina Wiegmann ( Germany, 1991–1999); Marta ( Brazil, 2003–2011); Abby Wambach ( United States, 2003–2011).
Most tournaments with at least four goals
2, Ann Kristin Aarønes ( Norway, 1995-1999); Birgit Prinz ( Germany, 2003-2007); Marta ( Brazil, 2007–2011); Abby Wambach ( United States, 2007–2011).
Most tournaments with at least five goals
2, Birgit Prinz ( Germany, 2003-2007).
Longest period between a player's first and last goals
15 years, 364 days; Solveig Gulbrandsen ( Norway, 23 June 1999 – 22 June 2015).
Longest period between one goal and another
12 years, 98 days; Anne Dot Eggers Nielsen ( Denmark, 6 June 1995 – 12 September 2007).
Youngest goalscorer
16 years, 107 days,[15] Elena Danilova ( Russia), vs Germany, 2 October 2003.
Youngest hat-trick scorer
20 years, 236 days, Inka Grings ( Germany), vs Mexico, 24 June 1999.
Youngest goalscorer, final
19 years, 196 days, Marianne Pettersen ( Norway), vs Germany, 18 June 1995.
Oldest goalscorer
37 years, 98 days,[7] Formiga ( Brazil), vs South Korea, 9 June 2015.
Oldest hat-trick scorer
32 years, 354 days,[16] Carli Lloyd ( United States), vs Japan, 5 July 2015.
Oldest goalscorer, final
32 years, 354 days, Carli Lloyd ( United States), vs Japan, 5 July 2015.
Most penalties scored (excluding during shootouts)
8, Bettina Wiegmann ( Germany, 2 each in 1991, 1995, 1999 & 2003).
First substitute winning goalscorer, final
came on 88th minute, Nia Künzer ( Germany), vs Sweden, 2003.
Fastest goal from kickoff
30 seconds,[17] Lena Videkull ( Sweden), vs Japan, 1991.
Fastest goal by a substitute
3 minutes,[18] Pia Wunderlich ( Germany), vs Russia, 2003; Linda Sembrant ( Sweden), vs Nigeria, 2015.
Fastest goal from kickoff in a final
3rd minute, Carli Lloyd ( United States), vs Japan, 2015.
Latest goal from kickoff
122nd minute, Abby Wambach (United States United States), vs Brazil, 2011.
Latest goal from kickoff in a final
117th minute, Homare Sawa ( Japan), vs United States, 2011.
Latest goal from kickoff in a final, with no goals scored between
69th minute, Alex Morgan ( United States), vs Japan, 2011.

Team[edit]

Biggest margin of victory
11,  Germany (11) vs  Argentina (0), 2007.
Biggest margin of victory, qualifying match
21,[19]  Japan (21) vs  Guam (0), 1997 AFC Championship Group A;  Canada (21) vs  Puerto Rico (0), 1998 CONCACAF Championship Group A;  New Zealand (21) vs  Samoa (0), 1998 OFC Championship Group A;  Australia (21) vs  American Samoa (0), 1998 OFC Championship Group B.
Most goals scored in a match, one team
11,  Germany vs Argentina, 2007.
Most goals scored in a match, both teams
11,   Switzerland (10) vs  Ecuador (1), 2015.
Highest scoring draw
3–3,  Sweden vs  Nigeria, 2015.
Most goals scored in extra time, both teams
2,  Brazil (2) vs  United States (2), 2011;  Japan (2) vs  United States (2), 2011.
Most goals scored in a semi-final, one team
5,  United States, vs Germany, 1991;  China PR, vs Norway, 1999.
Most goals scored in a semi-final, both teams
7, United States United States (5) vs Germany Germany (2), 1991.
Most goals scored in a final, one team
5,  United States, vs Japan, 2015.
Most goals scored in a final, both teams
7,  United States (5) vs  Japan (2), 2015.
Fewest goals scored in a final, both teams
0,  United States (0) vs  China PR (0), 1999.
Most goals in a tournament, one team
25,  United States, 1991;  Germany, 2003.
Most individual goalscorers for one team, one match
6,  Norway, vs Canada, 1999 (Ann Kristin Aarønes, Unni Lehn, Hege Riise, Linda Medalen, Marianne Pettersen, Solveig Gulbrandsen);  Germany, vs Ivory Coast, 2015 (Célia Šašić, Anja Mittag, Simone Laudehr, Sara Däbritz, Melanie Behringer, Alexandra Popp).
Most individual goalscorers for one team, one tournament
10,  United States, 1999 (Mia Hamm, Julie Foudy, Kristine Lilly, Tiffeny Milbrett, Michelle Akers, Cindy Parlow, Shannon MacMillan, Tisha Venturini, Brandi Chastain, Joy Fawcett) and  Germany, 2003 (Bettina Wiegmann, Stefanie Gottschlich, Birgit Prinz, Kerstin Garefrekes, Sandra Minnert, Maren Meinert, Conny Pohlers, Martina Müller, Pia Wunderlich, Nia Künzer).
Fewest individual goalscorers for one team, one tournament, champions
6,  Japan, 2011 (Nahomi Kawasumi, Karina Maruyama, Aya Miyama, Yūki Nagasato, Shinobu Ohno, Homare Sawa).

Tournament[edit]

Most goals scored in a tournament
146 goals, 2015.
Fewest goals scored in a tournament
86 goals, 2011.
Most goals per match in a tournament
3.84 goals per match, 1999.
Fewest goals per match in a tournament
2.69 goals per match,[20] 2011.
Most scorers in a tournament
90, 2015.
Most players scoring at least two goals in a tournament
31, 2003.
Most players scoring at least three goals in a tournament
13, 2003.
Most players scoring at least four goals in a tournament
9, 1991.
Most players scoring at least five goals in a tournament
5, 1991; 2007.
Most players scoring at least six goals in a tournament
4, 1991Michelle Akers (United States United States), Carin Jennings (United States United States), Linda Medalen (Norway Norway) and Heidi Mohr (Germany Germany).
Most players scoring at least seven goals in a tournament
2, 1991Michelle Akers (United States United States) and Heidi Mohr (Germany Germany); 1999Sissi (Brazil Brazil) and Sun Wen (China China).

Own goals[edit]

Most own goals in a tournament
6, 2015.
Most own goals scored in a match, player
2, Angie Ponce ( Ecuador), vs Switzerland, 2015.
Most own goals scored in a match, one team
2,  Ecuador, vs Switzerland, 2015.
Scoring for both teams in the same match
Brandi Chastain (United States United States), vs Germany, 1999 – own goal in the 5th minute, goal in the 49th minute; Eva González (Argentina Argentina), vs England, 2007 – own goal in the 9th minute, goal in the 60th minute; Angie Ponce ( Ecuador), vs Switzerland, 2015 – two own goals in the 24th minute and 71st minute, goal in the 64th minute.

Top-scoring teams by tournament[edit]

Teams listed in bold won the tournament.

Total and average goals[edit]

Year Teams Matches Goals Top scorer Average goals
1991 12 26 99 10 3.81
1995 12 26 99 6 3.81
1999 16 32 123 7 3.84
2003 16 32 107 7 3.34
2007 16 32 111 7 3.47
2011 16 32 86 5 2.69
2015 24 52 146 6 2.81

Most and fewest in bold.

Goalkeeping[edit]

Most matches played, finals
22, Bente Nordby ( Norway, 1995–2007).
Most clean sheets (matches without conceding)
10, Briana Scurry (United States United States, 1995–2007).
Most consecutive minutes without conceding a goal (finals)
622 minutes (6 consecutive clean sheets), Nadine Angerer ( Germany, 2007-2011).
Most consecutive minutes without conceding a goal (one tournament)
540 minutes, Nadine Angerer ( Germany, 2007); Hope Solo ( United States, 2015).
Most goals conceded, one tournament
17, Shirley Berruz ( Ecuador, 2015).
Most goals conceded, one tournament, hosts
6, Han Wenxia (China China, 2007).
Most goals conceded, one match
11, Vanina Correa (Argentina Argentina), vs Germany, 2007.
Fewest goals conceded, one tournament, champions
0, Nadine Angerer (Germany Germany, 2007).
Fewest goals conceded, one tournament
0, Nadine Angerer (Germany Germany, 2007).
Fewest goals conceded, penalty shootouts, one match
1, Ayumi Kaihori (Japan Japan), vs United States, 2011.
Youngest goalkeeper
16 years, 251 days,[21] Cecilia Santiago ( Mexico), vs England, 27 June 2011.
Oldest goalkeeper
39 years, 159 days,[10] Meg ( Brazil), vs Germany, 9 June 1995.

Coaching[edit]

Most matches coached
25,[22] Even Pellerud ( Norway, 1991–1995, 2015;  Canada, 2003–2007).
Most matches won
16, Even Pellerud ( Norway, 1991–1995, 2015;  Canada, 2003–2007).
Most matches lost
7, Even Pellerud ( Norway, 1991–1995, 2015;  Canada, 2003–2007).
Most tournaments
5,[22] Even Pellerud (1991-1995, 2003-2007, 2015).
Most consecutive tournaments with same team
3, Silvia Neid ( Germany, 2007–2015).
Youngest coach
26 years, 4 months and 3 days,[23] Vanessa Arauz ( Ecuador), vs Cameroon, 8 June 2015.
Youngest coach, champions
40 years, 7 months and 21 days, Anson Dorrance ( United States), 1991.
Oldest coach
66 years, 10 months and 13 days,[22] Paulo Goncalves ( Brazil), vs Sweden, 1 October 2003.
Oldest coach, champions
53 years, 1 month and 23 days, Norio Sasaki ( Japan), 2011.
Quickest substitution made
6th minute, Chong Tsu-pin ( Chinese Taipei), Hong Li-chyn for Liu Hsiu-mei, vs Nigeria, 1991; Marika Domanski-Lyfors ( Sweden), Therese Lundin for Hanna Ljungberg, vs Ghana, 1999.
Most final appearances as player and head coach
5, Silvia Neid,  Germany (1991 & 1995 as player; 2007, 2011 & 2015 as coach).
First person to have played and coached at the finals
April Heinrichs, was the first person ever to have had both roles – as player for United States in 1991 and later as coach in 2003.
Best performance by a foreign coach
A foreign coach has never managed a World Cup-winning team. The best performance by a team with a foreign coach is second place, reached by the United States in 2011 with Pia Sundhage of Sweden. The USA's coach for their 2015 victory, Jill Ellis, was born and spent her early childhood in England, but moved to the U.S. with her family at age 14, and had been a U.S. citizen for many years before becoming head coach in 2014.

Ages average[edit]

Youngest team
18 years, 8 months,[24]  Nigeria, 1991.
Youngest team, champions
23.7,  United States, 1991.
Oldest team
29 years, 5 months,[25]  United States, 2015.
Oldest team, champions
29 years, 5 months,  United States, 2015.
Lowest average of age at tournament
23 years, 11 months,[24] 1991.
Highest average of age at tournament
25 years, 2 months,[24] 2007.

Refereeing[edit]

Most tournaments
4, Kari Seitz ( United States, 1999–2011).
Most matches refereed, overall
10, Nicole Petignat (  Switzerland, 1999–2007)
Most matches refereed, one tournament
5, Anna-Marie Keighley ( New Zealand, 2015)

Discipline[edit]

Fastest sending off
2nd minute, Alicia Ferguson ( Australia), vs China, 1999.
Latest sending off
121st minute, Azusa Iwashimizu ( Japan), vs United States, 2011.
Most cautions (all-time, player)
5, Charmaine Hooper ( Canada, 1995–2003).
Most sendings off (all-time, player)
1, 17 players.
Most sendings off (tournament)
5, 1999 (in 32 matches).
Most sendings off (all-time, team)
2,  Australia,  Ghana,  United States.
Most sendings off (final match)
1, Azusa Iwashimizu (Japan Japan), vs United States, 2011.
Most cautions (tournament)
110, 2015 (in 52 matches).
Most cautions (all-time, team)
41,  Brazil (in 26 matches).
Most cautions (match, both teams)
8,  Brazil (4) vs  United States (4), 2011.
Most cautions (final match, one team)
3, Norway Norway, vs Germany, 1995.

Host records[edit]

Most times hosted
2,  United States (1999, 2003),  China PR (1991, 2007).
Had its best performance hosting
Champions:  United States (1999).
Semifinals:  United States (2003).
Quarterfinals: China China (1991, 2007), Sweden Sweden (1995), Germany Germany (2011), Canada Canada (2015).

Attendance[edit]

Highest attendance in a match
90,185,[26]  United States vs  China PR, 10 July 1999, Rose Bowl, Pasadena, United States, 1999.
Highest attendance in a final
90,185,[26]  United States vs  China PR, 10 July 1999, Rose Bowl, Pasadena, United States, 1999.
Lowest attendance in a match
250,  Nigeria vs  Canada, 8 June 1995, Olympia Stadion, Helsingborg, Sweden, 1995.
Highest average of attendance per match
37,319,[27] 1999, hosted by the United States.
Highest attendance in a tournament
1,353,506,[27] 2015, hosted by Canada.
Lowest average of attendance per match
4,316, 1995, hosted by Sweden.
Lowest attendance in a tournament
112,213, 1995, hosted by Sweden.

Total and average attendance[edit]

Year Matches Attendance
Total Average Lowest Highest
1991 26 510,000 19,615 TPE  GER Round 1 10,000 CHN  NOR Round 1 65,000
1995 26 112,213 4,316 NGA  CAN Round 1 250 GER  NOR Final 17,158
1999 32 1,194,215 37,319 NOR  CHN Semi-finals 8,986 NOR  BRA
USA  CHN
Third place match
Final
90,185
2003 32 656,789 20,525 AUS  RUS Round 1 8,500 USA  SWE Round 1 35,000
2007 32 1,156,955 36,155 SWE  NGA Round 1 21,740 CHN  NZL Round 1 56,208
2011 32 845,751 26,430 PRK  COL Round 1 7,805 GER  CAN Round 1 73,680
2015 52 1,353,506 26,029 CIV  NOR Round 1 7,147 CAN  ENG Quarter-finals 54,027

Penalty shootouts[edit]

Most shootouts, team, all-time
3,  United States.
Most shootouts, team, tournament
2,  United States, 2011.
Most shootouts, all teams, tournament
3, 2011.
Most wins, team, all-time
2,  United States.
Most wins, team, tournament
1, 7 teams.
Most losses, team, all-time
1, 7 teams.
Most shootouts with 100% record (all won)
1,  Germany;  Japan.
Most shootouts with 0% record (all lost)
1,  Sweden,  Norway,  England.
Most shootouts, kicker, all-time
2, Sun Wen,  China PR (1995 quarter final, 1999 final); Xie Huilin,  China PR (1995 quarter final, 1999 final); Shannon Boxx,  United States (2011 quarter final and final); Carli Lloyd,  United States (2011 quarter final and final); Abby Wambach,  United States (2011 quarter final and final); Camille Abily,  France (2011 quarter final, 2015 quarter final); Gaëtane Thiney,  France (2011 quarter final, 2015 quarter final).
Most saves, all-time
3, Ayumi Kaihori ( Japan, 2011).
Most saves, tournament
3, Ayumi Kaihori ( Japan, 2011).
Most saves, shootout
3, Ayumi Kaihori ( Japan), vs United States, 2011.

Extra time[edit]

By team[edit]

Most played
Most tournaments playing extra time

By tournament[edit]

Most played
Fewest played

References and footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ FIFA Women's World Cup Golden Ball Awards, RSSSF.com. Retrieved 23 July 2014.
  2. ^ a b "36 days to go". FIFA. Retrieved 1 May 2015.
  3. ^ https://twitter.com/FIFAWWC/status/617855360984944640
  4. ^ "50 days to go". FIFA. Retrieved 17 April 2015.
  5. ^ "10 days to go". FIFA. Retrieved 27 May 2015.
  6. ^ "13 days to go". FIFA. Retrieved 24 May 2015.
  7. ^ a b c d "Newcomers make their bows as records tumble". FIFA. Retrieved 10 June 2015.
  8. ^ a b "3 days to go". FIFA. Retrieved 3 June 2015.
  9. ^ The players are: Wang Liping ( China PR, 1999–2003), Bettina Wiegmann ( Germany, 1999–2003), Birgit Prinz ( Germany, 2003–2007), Shannon Boxx ( United States, 2003, 2011), Marta ( Brazil, 2007–2011); Nadine Angerer ( Germany, 2007, 2015); Lisa De Vanna ( Australia, 2007, 2015); Elise Kellond-Knight ( Australia, 2011–2015); Aya Miyama ( Japan, 2011–2015); Hope Solo ( United States, 2011–2015)
  10. ^ a b "39 days to go". FIFA. Retrieved 28 April 2015.
  11. ^ Bieler, Des (5 July 2015). "Women's World Cup: U.S. defeats Japan, 5-2, wins tournament for first time since 1999". Washington Post. Retrieved 5 July 2015.
  12. ^ "5 days to go". FIFA. Retrieved 2 June 2015.
  13. ^ "Women's World Cup 2015: Fabienne Humm scores fastest World Cup hat-trick". BBC. 13 June 2015. Retrieved 5 July 2015.
  14. ^ "US crush Japan to win Women's World Cup". Yahoo News. 5 July 2015. Retrieved 5 July 2015.
  15. ^ "43 days to go". FIFA. Retrieved 24 April 2015.
  16. ^ Bieler, Des (5 July 2015). "Women's World Cup: U.S. defeats Japan, 5-2, wins tournament for first time since 1999". Washington Post. Retrieved 5 July 2015.
  17. ^ "30 days to go". FIFA. Retrieved 7 May 2015.
  18. ^ "Big guns open with victories, Africans shine in the sun". FIFA. Retrieved 9 June 2015.
  19. ^ "97 days to go". FIFA. Retrieved 1 March 2015.
  20. ^ "87 days to go". FIFA. Retrieved 11 March 2015.
  21. ^ Las Aztecas can achieve something special after upsetting England UTV, 28 June 2011
  22. ^ a b c "Statistical Kit - FIFA Women's World Cup Canada 2015" (PDF). FIFA. Retrieved 6 June 2015.
  23. ^ "89 days to go". FIFA. Retrieved 9 March 2015.
  24. ^ a b c "23 days to go". FIFA. Retrieved 14 May 2015.
  25. ^ "Wiser, but older – will the age of the U.S. Women's World Cup team be a factor?". Fox News Channel. Retrieved 12 June 2015.
  26. ^ a b "25 days to go". FIFA. Retrieved 12 May 2015.
  27. ^ a b "37 days to go". FIFA. Retrieved 30 April 2015.