Ellen White (footballer)

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Ellen White
Ellen White 47986452323 james boyes (cropped).jpg
White in 2018
Personal information
Full name Ellen Toni Convery[1]
Birth name Ellen Toni White
Date of birth (1989-05-09) 9 May 1989 (age 32)[2]
Place of birth Aylesbury, England[3]
Height 5 ft 7 in (1.70 m)[4]
Position(s) Forward[4]
Club information
Current team
Manchester City
Number 18
Youth career
1997–2005 Arsenal
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
2005–2008 Chelsea ? (?)
2008–2010 Leeds Carnegie ? (?)
2010–2013 Arsenal 32 (11)
2014–2016 Notts County 24 (6)
2017–2019 Birmingham City 26 (23)
2019– Manchester City 34 (16)
National team
2010 England U23 3 (0)
2010– England 100 (45)
2012– Great Britain 8 (6)
Honours
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 30 June 2021[5]
‡ National team caps and goals correct as of 27 November 2021

Ellen Toni White (married Convery, born 9 May 1989) is an English international footballer who plays as a forward for Manchester City and the England national team. With England, she has competed at three FIFA Women's World Cup tournaments: in the 2011, 2015 and 2019, reaching the semi-finals in 2015 and 2019 and finishing third in 2015. White earned the Bronze Boot award at the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup in France. She represented Great Britain team at the 2012 and 2020 Summer Olympics.[6][7]

Having progressed through Arsenal academy, White returned to the Gunners in 2010 after spells with Chelsea and Leeds United. She has also played for Notts County and Birmingham City.[6][7] White earned the WSL's Golden Boot Award for most goals scored during the 2017–18 season. With Arsenal, she won the league in 2011 and 2012; the FA Women's Cup in 2011 and 2013 and the FA WSL Cup in 2011, 2012, and 2013. With Birmingham City, she was the league's top scorer in 2018. With Manchester City, she won the Women's FA Cup in 2020.

White has been named England's International Player of the Year three times, in 2011, 2018 and 2021.

Early life and education[edit]

Born and raised in Aylesbury, White attended The Grange School, Aylesbury.[8] While the school did not have a girls' football team, Ellen played with the boys.[9] White's father, Jon, ran a soccer academy called 'Mini Dux' in Aylesbury, where she played football as a child.[10] She then played football for Aylesbury Town before being spotted by Arsenal scouts at the age of eight.[10]

Club career[edit]

2005–08: Chelsea[edit]

Ellen White left Arsenal aged 16 to join London rivals Chelsea in 2005. White was top scorer for Chelsea for three seasons.

2008–10: Leeds United[edit]

White left Chelsea to join Leeds Carnegie in June 2008.[2][11] Within months of signing for Leeds, she suffered a cruciate ligament injury that kept her out of the game for a lengthy spell.[12] At the end of the 2008 season, she scored five goals in four matches.[13] During the 2009–10 season, her five goals in seven appearances ranked second on the team.[14] In February 2010, she scored twice as Leeds beat Everton in the final of the FA Women's Premier League Cup.[15]

2010–13: Arsenal[edit]

White with Arsenal warming up prior to a match.

In July 2010, White returned to Arsenal after five years away, following the break up of the Leeds squad due to a funding crisis.[16] During her time at Arsenal with manager Laura Harvey, they won three league titles and two FA Cups.[17] During the 2011 season, she scored six goals in thirteen appearances for the club.[5] Her first goal was a game-opener in the 40th minute of a 2–1 loss to Birmingham City.[5] Arsenal finished first in the league with a 10–2–2 record.[18] White's six goals ranked fourth highest in the league and second highest on the team.[18] The same year, she helped the club win the 2011 FA WSL Cup and 2010–11 FA Women's Cup.[5] During the semi-final of the 2010–11 FA Women's Cup, she scored a hat-trick lifting Arsenal to a 5–0 win over Barnet F.C. and berth to the final where they defeated Bristol Academy 2–0.[19][20]

During the 2012 season, White scored three goals in ten appearances.[5] On 23 September, she scored a brace against Liverpool lifting the team to a 4–0 win.[21] Her final goal of the season during a 1–1 draw against Birmingham City on 7 October ensured that Arsenal finished the season undefeated and in first place with a 10–0–4 record.[22][23]

White scored 2 goals in 14 appearances during the 2013 season.[5] Arsenal finished in first place for the third consecutive season of the new league.[24]

2013–16: Notts County[edit]

White (left) for Notts County in 2015.

White left Arsenal at the end of the 2013 season, joining Notts County on a three-year deal ahead of the 2014 season.[25] In April, White suffered an ACL injury and was out for the entire WSL season. In January 2015, the club confirmed that she was back in training ahead of the 2015 season.[26] White scored a goal and assist in her first two games since returning from injury.[27] She finished the 2015 season with 3 goals in 14 appearances.[5] Notts County finished the regular season in fifth place.[28] White scored three goals for Notts County during the 2016 season in ten appearances.[5] The club finished in sixth place during the regular season.[29]

2017–19: Birmingham City[edit]

White with Birmingham City in 2017

White left Notts County in 2017 and signed for Birmingham City after her contract had expired.[30] Despite being offered a new contract by Notts County, White made the move to the West Midlands, which seemed even more prudent after the latter were disbanded. White scored the winning penalty against Chelsea to take Birmingham to the 2017 FA Women's Cup Final where they were defeated 4–1 by Manchester City.[31] During the FA WSL Spring Series, White scored two goals in four appearances.[5] Birmingham City finished in seventh place.[32] During the 2017–18 season, her 15 goals in 14 matches ranked first in the league.[5] She scored a game-winning brace against Bristol City on 28 March and a hat-trick against Arsenal on 29 April securing the club's 3–0 win.[33] Birmingham City finished in fifth place during the regular season.[34] During the 2018–19 season, White scored six goals in eight appearances.[5] On 17 April 2019, she scored a brace against Everton lifting Birmingham City to a 3–1 win.[35] On 28 April, she scored a game-winning brace against Liverpool.[36] Birmingham City finished in fourth place during the regular season with a 13–6–1 record.[37]

2019–present: Manchester City[edit]

In May 2019, White announced she was joining Manchester City, signing on 1 July on a two-year deal.[38] At the start of the 2019–20 season, White suffered a knee injury requiring surgery causing her to miss the 2019 Women's International Champions Cup and the first three months of the season.[39][40] White's first appearance for Manchester City was in their Champions League defeat to Atlético Madrid.[41] White's first goal for the club was against her former club Birmingham City in the League Cup.[42] On 7 November 2020 White became the second player in WSL history to reach fifty goals after she scored a brace in Manchester City's 8–1 victory over Bristol City. On 7 February 2021 she became the all-time record goal scorer in the WSL, having scored 55 times to Vivianne Miedema's 54.[43] On 22 May 2021, White signed a two-year contract with Manchester City, keeping her there until 2023.[44]

International career[edit]

England[edit]

White played for England at under-17, under-19, under-20 and under-23 levels.[11] She made her senior England debut in March 2010 at home to Austria, scoring in the final minute as England won 3–0.[45]

After being selected in England's 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup squad, White scored a "wonder goal" in a 2–0 group stage win over Japan, who ultimately won the trophy.[46] White was personally recognised for her form over 2011, being voted the England Women's Player of the Year.[47]

White was selected for England's UEFA Women's Euro 2013 Squad. However, after scoring England's only goal in the friendly defeat to Sweden leading into the tournament, White was left frustrated by lack of service throughout the tournament as England crashed out at the group stage.[citation needed]

White (right) playing for England against Montenegro in April 2014.

Just months after returning from an ACL injury, White was called up for pre World Cup friendlies in April 2015.[27] White also made the final squad for England's 2015 Women's World Cup team,[48] after scoring three in qualification, netting two in an 8–0 win over Turkey[49] and another in a 6–0 win over Belarus.[50] White failed to score in the finals however, which saw England finish third—their best world cup performance.[51]

White (right) playing against Scotland at the 2017 Women's Euros.

White scored in England's opening match of the 2017 Women's Euros in a 6–0 win over Scotland.[52] This followed two goals in qualifying, in two different 7–0 victories over Serbia.[53][54] England finished top of group D, but were knocked out in the semi-finals by the eventual tournament champions Netherlands.[55]

White scored twice in the 2018 SheBelieves Cup, both coming in England's match against Germany.[56] White was joint top scorer in the competition which saw England finish second.[57] In the 2019 edition England won the tournament for the first time,[58] with White scoring once against Brasil.[59]

At the 2019 Women's World Cup, White scored in England's opening game against Scotland,[60] before scoring twice in England's final group stage game against Japan.[61] She scored her fourth of the tournament in the round of 16 match against Cameroon,[62] and later scored her fifth in a 3–0 quarter final win over Norway.[63] In the semi-final match against the USA, White scored the equaliser before having a second goal disallowed by VAR. She also won a penalty for England; however, the penalty was not converted and England was beaten by the holders – losing 2–1.[64][65] Her performance during the tournament has been compared with that of Harry Kane's World Cup performance due to their similar goal scoring record.[66] England finished in fourth place, losing to Sweden 2–1 in the third place play-off; although, White had a goal ruled out for handball by VAR.[67] White ended the tournament as joint top goalscorer with six goals, with that, she became England women's all-time top World Cup goalscorer and was awarded the Bronze Boot—as she recorded fewer assists than Silver and Golden Boot winners Alex Morgan and Megan Rapinoe respectively.[68]

On her return to the national team following a three month long injury, White scored in a 2–1 defeat to Germany at Wembley Stadium. The game attracted a record crowd for a Lioness's game of 77,768.[69]

During England's first game of 2021, and first in 11 months, White scored a hattrick in a 6–0 thrashing of Northern Ireland.[70]

White made her 100th cap for England against Austria on 27 November 2021 and scored the only goal in a 1–0 win, continuing England's one hundred percent winning run in qualification for the 2023 FIFA World Cup.[71]

Great Britain Olympics[edit]

In June 2012, White was named in the 18-woman Great Britain squad for the 2012 London Olympics,[72] where Team GB finished the tournament as quarter finalists after finishing top of their group.[73]

After being selected for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, White scored twice as Team GB played a warm up match against New Zealand.[74] White scored three times during the group stage including a brace in GB's Group E opener against Chile, in addition to a hattrick against Australia in the quarter final, which Team GB bowed out 4–3 in extra time after a 2–2 at the end of the 90 minutes.[75]

Personal life[edit]

White is married to Callum Convery.[76] White comes from a family of West Ham United supporters who, alongside her husband, regularly attend matches.[77]

Career statistics[edit]

Club[edit]

As of end of 2020–21 season[5]
From the 2011 season only
Appearances and goals by club, season and competition
Club Season League FA Cup League Cup Shield Europe Total
Division Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Arsenal 2011 WSL 1 13 6 ? ? 0 0 8 3 21 8
2012 WSL 1 10 3 ? ? 3 1 8 2 18 12
2013 WSL 1 14 2 ? ? 5 5 8 2 22 14
Arsenal UWCL 4 1 4 1
Total 32 11 ? ? 8 6 28 7 62 34
Notts County 2014 WSL 1 0 0 ? ? 0 0 0 0
2015 WSL 1 14 3 ? ? 7 6 14 3
2016 WSL 1 10 3 ? ? 2 2 10 3
Total 24 6 ? ? 9 4 33 11
Birmingham City 2017 WSL SS 4 2 ? ? 4 2
2017–18 WSL 14 15 ? ? 0 0 14 15
2018–19 WSL 8 6 ? ? 2 0 8 6
Total 26 23 ? ? 2 0 28 23
Manchester City 2019–20 WSL 12 6 1 2 4 1 1 0 18 9
2020–21 WSL 22 10 2 2 3 0 1 0 6 3 34 15
Total 34 16 3 4 7 1 1 0 7 3 62 24
Career total 123 56 3 4 26 15 1 0 36 11 185 92

International[edit]

Statistics accurate as of match played 27 November 2021.[5][78]
Year England Great Britain
Apps Goals Apps Goals
2010 8 4 N/A
2011 8 4 N/A
2012 3 1 4 0
2013 7 8 N/A
2014 1 0 N/A
2015 9 0 N/A
2016 2 2 N/A
2017 12 5 N/A
2018 6 2 N/A
2019 15 9 N/A
2020 3 1 N/A
2021 8 9 4 6
Total 100 45 8 6

International goals[edit]

As of match played 27 November 2021. England score listed first, score column indicates score after each White goal.[5][79]
Goal Date Venue Opponent Scored Result Competition
1 25 March 2010 Loftus Road, London, England  Austria 3–0 3–0 2011 FIFA World Cup Qual.
2 20 May 2010 Centenary Stadium, Ta' Qali, Malta  Malta 5–0 6–0
3 29 July 2010 Bescot Stadium, Walsall, England  Turkey 2–0 3–0
4 21 August 2010 Sepp-Doll-Stadion, Krems, Austria  Austria 4–0 4–0
5 2 March 2011 Neo GSZ Stadium, Larnaca, Cyprus  Italy 1–0 2–0 2011 Cyprus Cup
6 5 July 2011 Impuls Arena, Augsburg, Germany  Japan 1–0 2–0 2011 FIFA World Cup
7 22 September 2011 County Ground, Swindon, England  Slovenia 2–0 4–0 UEFA Euro 2013 Qual.
8 23 November 2011 Keepmoat Stadium, Doncaster, England  Serbia 2–0 2–0
9 31 March 2012 Sajmište, Vrbovec, Croatia  Croatia 4–0 6–0
10 6 March 2013 GSP Stadium, Nicosia, Cyprus  Italy 4–2 4–2 2013 Cyprus Cup
11 8 March 2013 GSZ Stadium, Larnaca, Cyprus  Scotland 1–1 4–4
12 11 March 2013 GSZ Stadium, Larnaca, Cyprus  New Zealand 1–1 3–1
13 7 April 2013 New York Stadium, Rotherham, England  Canada 1–0 1–0 Friendly
14 4 July 2013 Skarsjövallen, Uddevalla, Sweden  Sweden 1–0 1–4
15 21 September 2013 Dean Court, Bournemouth, England  Belarus 2–0 6–0 2015 FIFA World Cup Qual.
16 26 September 2013 Fratton Park, Portsmouth, England  Turkey 3–0 8–0
17 6–0
18 4 June 2016 Adams Park, Wycombe, England  Serbia 4–0 7–0 UEFA Euro 2017 Qual.
19 7 June 2016 Sports Center of FA of Serbia, Stara Pazova, Serbia  Serbia 2–0 7–0
20 4 March 2017 Red Bull Arena, Harrison, New Jersey, United States  United States 1–0 1–0 2017 SheBelieves Cup
21 10 April 2017 Stadium MK, Milton Keynes, England  Austria 1–0 3–0 Friendly
22 1 July 2017 Gladsaxe Stadium, Copenhagen, Denmark  Denmark 1–0 2–1
23 2–1
24 19 July 2017 Stadion Galgenwaard, Utrecht, Netherlands  Scotland 3–0 6–0 UEFA Euro 2017
25 4 March 2018 Red Bull Arena, Harrison, New Jersey, United States  Germany 1–1 2–2 2018 SheBelieves Cup
26 2–2
27 27 February 2019 Talen Energy Stadium, Philadelphia, United States  Brazil 1–1 2–1 2019 SheBelieves Cup
28 9 April 2019 County Ground, Swindon, England  Spain 2–0 2–1 Friendly
29 9 June 2019 Allianz Riviera, Nice, France  Scotland 2–0 2–1 2019 FIFA World Cup
30 19 June 2019 Allianz Riviera, Nice, France  Japan 1–0 2–0
31 2–0
32 23 June 2019 Stade du Hainaut, Valenciennes, France  Cameroon 2–0 3–0
33 27 June 2019 Stade Océane, Le Havre, France  Norway 2–0 3–0
34 2 July 2019 Parc Olympique Lyonnais, Décines-Charpieu, France  United States 1–1 1–2
35 9 November 2019 Wembley Stadium, London, England  Germany 1–1 1–2 Friendly
36 8 March 2020 Red Bull Arena, Harrison, New Jersey, United States  Japan 1–0 1–0 2020 SheBelieves Cup
37 23 February 2021 St George's Park, Burton, England  Northern Ireland 1–0 6–0 Friendly
38 2–0
39 4–0
40 17 September 2021 St Mary's Stadium, Southampton, England  North Macedonia 2–0 8–0 2023 FIFA Women's World Cup Qual.
41 4–0
42 21 September 2021 Stade de Luxembourg, Luxembourg City, Luxembourg  Luxembourg 1–0 10–0
43 2–0
44 26 October 2021 Daugava Stadium, Riga, Latvia  Latvia 3–0 10–0
45 27 November 2021 Stadium of Light, Sunderland, England  Austria 1–0 1–0
As of match played 24 July 2021. Playing for Great Britain women's Olympic football team. Team GB score listed first.
Goal Date Venue Opponent Scored Result Competition
#
[a]
14 July 2021 Kawasaki Todoroki Stadium, Tokyo, Japan  New Zealand 1–0 3–0 Friendly
3–0
1 21 July 2021 Sapporo Dome, Sapporo, Japan  Chile 1–0 2–0 2020 Summer Olympics
2 2–0
3 24 July 2021 Sapporo Dome, Sapporo, Japan  Japan 1–0 1–0
4 30 July 2021 Kashima Soccer Stadium, Kashima, Japan  Australia 1–1 3–4
(a.e.t.)
5 2–1
6 3–4

Honours[edit]

Club[edit]

White with the 2011 FA WSL trophy

Leeds United[15]

Arsenal[6][80][81][82]

Manchester City

International[edit]

England U19

England

Individual[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ As this match was not recognised by either football association as an official friendly, the goals scored do not count towards official statistics and are not included in the above table of international goals and appearances.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Women's Olympic Football Tournament Tokyo 2020: Squad list, Great Britain" (PDF). FIFA. 7 July 2021. p. 6. Retrieved 15 August 2021.
  2. ^ a b "Ellen White". Leeds Carnegie Ladies. Archived from the original on 9 December 2009. Retrieved 26 March 2010.
  3. ^ "Women's World Cup 2019: Mapping England's Lionesses squad". BBC Sport. 2 July 2019. Retrieved 6 September 2019.
  4. ^ a b "FIFA Women's World Cup Canada 2015: List of players: England" (PDF). FIFA. 6 July 2015. p. 10. Retrieved 1 June 2019.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n "E. White". Soccerway. Retrieved 10 May 2018.
  6. ^ a b c "Ellen White". The FA.com.
  7. ^ a b "Ellen White". BCFC.com. Archived from the original on 6 January 2018. Retrieved 6 January 2018.
  8. ^ "We're so proud of Ellen White!". The Grange School. Retrieved 18 April 2021.
  9. ^ Shefferd, Neil (2 July 2019). "'A caring and conscientious student': Teachers share their memories of Aylesbury and England football star Ellen White". The Bucks Herald. Retrieved 18 April 2021.
  10. ^ a b "Interview with Chelsea starlet Ellen White". The Bucks Herald. 25 September 2007. Archived from the original on 20 April 2013. Retrieved 26 March 2010.
  11. ^ a b "Leeds ladies sign striker White". BBC Sport. 23 June 2008. Retrieved 26 March 2010.
  12. ^ "Premier League Countdown". Female Soccer. 16 August 2008. Retrieved 26 March 2010.
  13. ^ "Ellen White". 31 August 2009. Archived from the original on 9 December 2009. Retrieved 18 April 2021.
  14. ^ "Player stats: 2009–10". Leeds Carnegie Ladies Football Club. Archived from the original on 9 November 2009. Retrieved 18 April 2021.
  15. ^ a b "'Overwhelmed' White lauds Final effort". The Football Association. 12 February 2010. Retrieved 26 March 2010.
  16. ^ a b "White thrilled by Arsenal return". UEFA.com. 13 July 2010. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  17. ^ "Ellen White signs for Notts County". www.arsenal.com. Retrieved 20 November 2019.
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  21. ^ Leighton, Tony (23 September 2012). "Women's Super League: Arsenal close in on title". BBC. Retrieved 18 April 2021.
  22. ^ Leighton, Tony (7 October 2012). "Women's Super League: Arsenal draw to finish season unbeaten". BBC. Retrieved 18 April 2021.
  23. ^ "2012 FA WSL". Soccerway. Retrieved 18 April 2021.
  24. ^ Jones, Max (11 November 2015). "Arsenal Ladies: a decade of success". Arsenal. Retrieved 18 April 2021.
  25. ^ "Ellen White: Notts County Ladies sign Arsenal striker". BBC Sport. 20 December 2013. Retrieved 3 January 2014.
  26. ^ "Notts County Ladies: Ellen White suffers serious knee injury". BBC Sport. 22 April 2014.
  27. ^ a b "Ellen White elated after England World Cup call". Sky Sports. Retrieved 20 November 2019.
  28. ^ "2015 FA WSL". Soccerway. Retrieved 18 April 2021.
  29. ^ "2016 FA WSL". Soccerway. Retrieved 18 April 2021.
  30. ^ "Ellen White joins Birmingham". BBC.com. 13 January 2017. Retrieved 17 August 2017.
  31. ^ "Birmingham beat Chelsea 4–2 on penalties". BBC.com. 17 April 2017. Retrieved 17 August 2017.
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  36. ^ "Birmingham City Women 2 Liverpool Women". BBC. Retrieved 18 April 2021.
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  38. ^ "#WelcomeEllen City sign Ellen White". MCFC.
  39. ^ "Injury update: Bardsley and White". Mancity.com. Manchester City F.C. 9 August 2019. Retrieved 13 August 2019.
  40. ^ "Manchester City Women: England duo Ellen White & Karen Bardsley injured". BBC Sport. 23 August 2019.
  41. ^ "Women's Champions League: Atletico Madrid 2–1 Manchester City (3–2 agg)". BBC Sport. 30 October 2019.
  42. ^ "Continental Cup highlights: City 2–1 Birmingham".
  43. ^ Wrack, Suzanne (7 February 2021). "Lauren Hemp lifts Manchester City but Arsenal retain title hopes". The Guardian. Retrieved 7 February 2021.
  44. ^ "White signs new two-year Man City deal". BBC Sport. Retrieved 22 May 2021.
  45. ^ "A striking victory". The Football Association. 25 March 2010. Retrieved 26 March 2010.
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  47. ^ a b "WHITE VOTED WOMEN'S PLAYER OF 2011". The Football Association. 27 February 2012. Retrieved 27 February 2012.
  48. ^ "Women's World Cup: Who is in England's squad for Canada?". BBC Sport. 11 May 2015.
  49. ^ Leighton, Tony (26 September 2013). "England Women 8 Turkey Women 0: match report". The Telegraph.
  50. ^ "England women 6 Belarus women 0 – Karen Carney scores hat-trick in World Cup qualifer [sic]". The Telegraph. 21 September 2013.
  51. ^ "Women's World Cup: Crowds, keepers & heroic England". BBC Sport. 6 July 2015.
  52. ^ "UEFA Women's EURO 2017 – History – England-Scotland". Uefa.com.
  53. ^ "UEFA Women's EURO 2017 – History – England-Serbia". Uefa.com.
  54. ^ "UEFA Women's EURO 2017 – History – Serbia-England". Uefa.com.
  55. ^ "Women's Euro 2017: England knocked out in semi-finals by Netherlands". 3 August 2017 – via www.bbc.co.uk.
  56. ^ "Germany Draws England 2–2 on Second Matchday of 2018 SheBelieves Cup". www.ussoccer.com. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  57. ^ "WNT Wins 2018 SheBelieves Cup with 1–0 Victory vs. England". www.ussoccer.com. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
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  59. ^ "News & Stories | U.S. Soccer Official Website". www.ussoccer.com. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  60. ^ "Report | England begin World Cup campaign with win over Scotland". The Independent. 9 June 2019.
  61. ^ Taylor, Louise (19 June 2019). "Ellen White's double sinks Japan and seals top spot in group for England". The Guardian – via www.theguardian.com.
  62. ^ "England beat Cameroon to reach quarter-finals amid VAR drama". Guardian. 23 June 2019. Retrieved 23 June 2019.
  63. ^ "Ellen White just broke a record for England at the Women's World Cup". The Independent. 27 June 2019.
  64. ^ "Ellen White will have to make do with the consolation prize of a life-changing World Cup". www.telegraph.co.uk.
  65. ^ Reporter, Metro Sport (2 July 2019). "Ellen White breaks down in tears after England suffer World Cup heartbreak".
  66. ^ Moore, Glenn. "Ellen White: England's modest goal machine whose elevation to stardom has been years in the making".
  67. ^ Taylor, Louise (7 July 2019). "Phil Neville struggles with handball minefield after England VAR nightmare". The Guardian. Retrieved 8 July 2019.
  68. ^ a b "Ellen White earns World Cup bronze in Golden Boot". Manchester City FC. 7 July 2019.
  69. ^ "England Women at Wembley: Was this a watershed moment for women's football?".
  70. ^ "England Women 6–0 Northern Ireland: Ellen White scores hat-trick as Jill Scott marks 150th cap in style". Sky Sports.
  71. ^ https://www.sunderlandecho.com/sport/other-sport/the-story-of-the-day-as-england-defeat-austria-with-ellen-white-goal-in-world-cup-qualifying-match-at-stadium-of-light-3473876
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  74. ^ Whyatt, Katie. "Katie Whyatt: Team GB beat New Zealand 3–0 in their behind..." The Athletic. Retrieved 14 July 2021.
  75. ^ "Team GB's Ellen White: Who is the woman behind the goals?". Tokyo 2020. Retrieved 30 July 2021.
  76. ^ "Ellen White interview: Lionesses own the night – England striker out to fire it up once more". 3 March 2014. Retrieved 23 June 2019.
  77. ^ "Ellen White on England, the World Cup & the Women's Game".
  78. ^ https://www.englandfootball.com/womens-senior-team/squad/Ellen-White
  79. ^ Karsdorp, Dirk (2018). The England Women's FC 1972 – 2018: The Lionesses – A Statistical Record. Soccer Books Ltd. ISBN 978-1-86223-391-1.
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  81. ^ "Arsenal Ladies 1–0 Birmingham City". FAWSL.com.
  82. ^ "MATCH REPORT: CONTINENTAL CUP FINAL". FAWSL.com.
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  84. ^ "England women beat Canada 1–0 to triumph in Cyprus Cup final". BBC Sport. 13 March 2013.
  85. ^ "Match for third place – Match report" (PDF). FIFA. 4 July 2015. Archived from the original (PDF) on 6 July 2015. Retrieved 7 July 2019.
  86. ^ "England record statement win over Japan to clinch prestigious SheBelieves Cup". The FA. 5 March 2019.
  87. ^ Zeqiri, Daniel (June 2018). "Ellen White wins Vauxhall England Women's Player of the Year". The Telegraph.
  88. ^ Davies, Callum (15 September 2021). "Lionesses striker named BT England Women's player of the year for 2021". EnglandFootball.com.
  89. ^ "Ellen White Named FA WSL 1 Player of the Month". Birmingham City Ladies. Archived from the original on 17 April 2018. Retrieved 16 April 2018.
  90. ^ "FA WSL 1 Top Scorers". BBC Sport.

Further reading[edit]

  • Aluko, Eniola (2019), They Don't Teach This, Random House, ISBN 9781473564480
  • Caudwell, Jayne (2013), Women's Football in the UK: Continuing with Gender Analyses, Taylor & Francis, ISBN 9781317966234
  • Clarke, Gemma (2019), Soccerwomen: The Icons, Rebels, Stars, and Trailblazers Who Transformed the Beautiful Game, ISBN 9781568589206
  • Dunn, Carrie (2019), Pride of the Lionesses: The Changing Face of Women's Football in England, Pitch Publishing (Brighton) Limited, ISBN 9781785315411
  • Dunn, Carrie (2016), The Roar of the Lionesses: Women's Football in England, Pitch Publishing Limited, ISBN 9781785311512
  • Grainey, Timothy (2012), Beyond Bend It Like Beckham: The Global Phenomenon of Women's Soccer, University of Nebraska Press, ISBN 0803240368
  • Smith, Kelly (2012), Footballer: My Story, Transworld, ISBN 9781446488591
  • Stay, Shane (2019), The Women's World Cup 2019 Book: Everything You Need to Know About the Soccer World Cup, Books on Demand, ISBN 1782551921
  • Theivam, Keiran and Jeff Kassouf (2019), The Making of the Women's World Cup: Defining stories from a sport’s coming of age, Little, ISBN 1472143310

External links[edit]