Fruit 'n Fibre

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Tesco-brand version ("Fruit & Fibre")
Kellogg's Fruit 'n Fibre

Fruit 'n Fibre is a breakfast cereal produced by Kellogg's (although supermarkets may produce their own brand of this type of breakfast cereal) and sold in various countries (including the UK). It consists of wheat flakes, dried fruit (sultanas, raisins, coconut, banana, and apple) and hazelnuts. Versions of this cereal are also produced by other companies under similar names, such as Fruit & Fibre. The Kellogg's version is also known as Optima Fruit & Fibre in some markets (this name was used in the UK for a short period from 1997, but was eventually changed back).

One of Fruit 'n Fibre's main selling points is its relatively high level of dietary fibre, although it does not contain as much of this as bran-based cereals (such as Bran Flakes or All-Bran) normally do.

In the early-1990s, some television advertisements for the cereal featured a jingle with the chorus "Fruit & Fibre." The melody was identical to Frank Sinatra's song "Love and Marriage,"[citation needed] also known as the theme of the television show Married... with Children.

For the UK, however, the best-known advert for the cereal dates from the 1980s, featuring Ross Kemp and the jingle "Apples, hazelnuts, bananas; raisins, coconuts, sultanas".

Post Cereals "Fruit & Fiber" (U.S.)[edit]

A cereal called "Fruit & Fiber" was produced in the United States by Post Cereals in two versions: Dates, Raisins & Walnuts; and Peaches, Raisins & Almonds. Circa 2004, the name was changed to Fruit & Bran; both versions were continued after the name change. Towards the end of 2006, production of Fruit & Bran cereal was discontinued by Post, with no version of Fruit & Fiber currently available in the U.S.[citation needed]

One advertising campaign featured the tagline, "Tastes so good, you'll forget the fiber," as cereal eaters in the commercial would try to remember the name of the brand.

Another campaign in the U.S. featured comedian Tim Conway insisting on pronouncing the word "fibre" as if it were a French word, sounding something like "FEE - bray".

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