Functional gastrointestinal disorder

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
intestinal disorder
Classification and external resources
MeSH D003109

Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID) include a number of separate idiopathic disorders which affect different parts of the gastrointestinal tract and involve visceral hypersensitivity and impaired gastrointestinal motility.[1][2] Heightened mast cell activation is a common factor among all FGIDs that contributes to visceral hypersensitivity as well as epithelial, neuromuscular, and motility dysfunction.[2]


The Rome process has helped to define the functional gastrointestinal disorders.[3] Successively, the Rome I, Rome II, and the Rome III meetings have proposed a consensual classification system and terminology, as recommended by the Rome Coordinating Committee.


Functional gastrointestinal disorders have been found in 60-70% of both Canadian and American populations.[1] Globally, irritable bowel syndrome and functional dyspepsia alone affect 16–26% of the population.[2]


  1. ^ a b Fass R (January 2009). "Functional heartburn: what it is and how to treat it". Gastrointest. Endosc. Clin. N. Am. 19 (1): 23–33, v. doi:10.1016/j.giec.2008.12.002. PMID 19232278. 
  2. ^ a b c Wouters MM, Vicario M, Santos J (2015). "The role of mast cells in functional GI disorders". Gut. doi:10.1136/gutjnl-2015-309151. PMID 26194403. Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) are characterized by chronic complaints arising from disorganized brain-gut interactions leading to dysmotility and hypersensitivity. The two most prevalent FGIDs, affecting up to 16–26% of worldwide population, are functional dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome. ... It is well established that mast cell activation can generate epithelial and neuro-muscular dysfunction and promote visceral hypersensitivity and altered motility patterns in FGIDs, postoperative ileus, food allergy and inflammatory bowel disease.
    ▸ Mast cells play a central pathophysiological role in IBS and possibly in functional dyspepsia, although not well defined.
    ▸ Increased mast cell activation is a common finding in the mucosa of patients with functional GI disorders. ...
    ▸ Treatment with mast cell stabilisers offers a reasonably safe and promising option for the management of those patients with IBS non-responding to conventional approaches, though future studies are warranted to evaluate efficacy and indications.
  3. ^ "Rome Foundation // Scoring Rome III Questionnaire using SAS".