Harlington, London

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Harlington
Church of S. Peter & S. Paul, Harlington & war memorial, late August 2013.jpg
The Grade I Listed parish church is the oldest of the listed buildings in Harlington. The War Memorial was designed by C. O. Scott.
Harlington is located in Greater London
Harlington
Harlington
 Harlington shown within Greater London
OS grid reference TQ085775
   – Charing Cross 13.5 mi (21.7 km)  E
London borough Hillingdon
Ceremonial county Greater London
Region London
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town HAYES
Postcode district UB3
Dialling code 020
Police Metropolitan
Fire London
Ambulance London
EU Parliament London
UK Parliament Hayes and Harlington
London Assembly Ealing and Hillingdon
List of places
UK
England
London

Coordinates: 51°29′09″N 0°26′11″W / 51.4859°N 0.4364°W / 51.4859; -0.4364

Harlington is a district of the London Borough of Hillingdon, on the northern perimeter of London Heathrow Airport. It is centred 13.6 miles (21.9 km) west of Charing Cross. The district adjoins Hayes to the north and shares a railway station with the larger district, which is its post town, on the Great Western Main Line.

Etymology[edit]

The place-name Harlington is recorded in Anglo-Saxon as Hygereding tun: "Hygerǣd's people's farmstead".

History[edit]

Bolingbroke and Ossulston's demolished Dawley House, north-west of the station

The earliest surviving mention of Harlington appears to be in a 9th-century charter in which land at Botwell in Hayes was said to be bounded on the west by "Hygeredington" and "Lullinges" tree. The first of these must be Harlington; the second has not been identified. The boundary between Hayes and Harlington, which may thus have been defined by the date of this charter, was later marked by North Hyde Road and Dawley Road, but Dawley Road may not have followed the boundary before the 18th century.[1]

From 1930 to 1965 Harlington formed part of Hayes and Harlington Urban District. The urban district council's cemetery in Cherry Lane was opened in 1936. Harlington was in Middlesex, until the county was abolished in 1965.

See the entry for Hayes for more detailed local history.

Photograph of Dawley House and barns, Harlington, 1902. (Between the Great Western Railway and the canal). This was the remains of the house of Bolingbroke and Ossulston. It can be seen to the east or right of the mansion in the print.
Dawley House, Harlington, c. 1902. This was the remains of the house of Bolingbroke and Ossulston. It can be seen to the east or right of the mansion in the print.

Present day[edit]

Harlington Library is towards the north of the village/district. The village contains six public houses: Captain Morgans', The Great Western, The Pheasant, The Red Lion, The Wheatsheaf, and The White Hart. There are two churches, a baptist church and a Church of England church, St Peter & St Paul's.

Hellenic Imperial Airways has its United Kingdom offices in Axis House in Harlington.[2] Harlington Locomotive Society on the High Street of the village - operates a trestle railway around the site of an old orchard.Harlington is covered by a community radio station: 91.8 Hayes FM, which is licensed with the national authority.

Bridge (196) over the Grand Union and Junction Canal at Dawley, Harlington, 2014.
Northern end of the Parish: the Dawley Wall, from the inside, 2014.

Churches[edit]

The Woolpack, on the Dawley Road and by the canal, 2014.
Old building, Harlington, 2014.
S. Peter & S. Paul's church hall, 2014.
Great Western Railway and part of the former HMV & EMI factory at Harlington, looking east, 2014.
Close up, the Dawley Wall, 2014.

Transport[edit]

London is centred 13.6 miles (21.9 km) east. The area is served by a train station, coterminous with the larger Hayes to the north and by the following public transport.[4] Buses connect the village to Slough, Hounslow, Northolt, Feltham, Greenford, Kingston, Harrow Weald, Uxbridge, and Heathrow Airport.

In the late 1830s the main line of the Great Western Railway was built across the former Dawley Park (by then Dawley Wall Farm). However, Hayes & Harlington railway station (just outside the parish) was not opened until 1864. Before then there was a choice of the stations at West Drayton and Southall, or of the daily omnibus and weekly carrier to London.[5] The Grand Junction Canal also runs across the parish, also through the Dawley land, east to west: it was constructed circa 1794-1800.[6]

Cottage Hospital[edit]

The Harlington, Harmondsworth and Cranford Cottage Hospital, in Sipson Lane, opened in 1884 and closed in 1977. It is now home to a branch of the Sant Nirankari Satsang Bhawan.

Listed buildings[edit]

name type built use and main features
Church of St. Peter & St. Paul (Grade One Listed) Religious 12th century Christian faith centre.
Veysey's Farm Farm late 18th century Mixed agricultural/nature
Shackle's Barn Agricultural early 1800s Scouts headquarters
Barn at Manor Farm Agricultural Restored in the 1970s, used as offices, timber-framed
Small hospital (Sipson Lane) Social 1884 Hindu faith centre.
Dower House (High Street) House 16th century Timber framed building
Harlington Baptist Church Religious 1879 Christian faith centre.
Part of a Thomas Kitchin map of Middlesex showing Dawley and Harlington, c. 1770.
Tower of church of Saints Peter & Saint Paul, 2014, from the south.

Former listed buildings in the parish[edit]

name type built demolished (exact or between dates) use
Dawley Manor Farm House 17th century 1962 M4 motorway and part of St Peter's Way
Shackle's House House early 1800s 1960-1970 Pembury Court (street)
Harlington rectory House Victorian 1970 Homes and the new church hall
Old Church Hall Church hall early 1900s 1970 Was in rectory grounds. Houses.
Bletchmore House House 1970-1980 Bletchmore Close
Woodlands Farmhouse House 1960-1965 178-182 High Street
Poplar House House 18th century 1970-1975 Felbridge Court (apartments)

Manor Farm was demolished between 1930 and 1940 and pre-dated the possibility of statutory listing. It is the site of shops in Manor Parade and adjoining residential roads.

Nearest places[edit]

Notable people[edit]

Dawley Court, Goulds Green, Middlesex in 1893, when it belonged to W. Fane De Salis. (Just to the west of Corwell Lane).
Lady De Tabley is buried alongside her eldest daughter in the SS Peter & Paul graveyard.
  • Politician and philosopher, Henry St John, 1st Viscount Bolingbroke (1678 – 1751),[12] of Dawley House. Alexander Pope describes his friend Bolingbroke, the noble farmer who had engaged a painter for £200 to give the correct agricultural air to his country hall by ornamenting it with trophies of spades, rakes, and prongs.[13] Bolingbroke bought Dawley for £22,000 in 1724, moved there in 1725. With help from Charles Bridgeman he worked on the 400 acres of park and 20 acres of garden, making a ferme ornée, while James Gibbs beautified the house.[14] He sold it in 1737, or 1738, for £26,0000 to Edward Stephenson (1691-1768), MP for Sudbury 1734-1741, and for two days Governor of Fort William, 1728,[15] who passed it on again soon after 1748;[9]
  • Dame Lettice Poyntz (died circa 1610), aka Laetitia FitzGerald, niece of the fair Geraldine and sister of Gerald FitzGerald, 14th Earl of Kildare, first wife Sir Ambrose Coppinger, of Dawley, (c.1546-1604), MP for Ludgershall in 1586. She married secondly John Morice, MP, (1568-1618), aka Sir John Poyntz. She left £100 to the village, eighty pounds of which was later used to purchase six acres of land the income from which was to support good causes in the parish;,[16][17]
  • Founder of Tattersalls, Richard Tattersall (1724-1795), c. 1779 began a stud farm at Dawley (aka Dawley House) which was called Dawley Wall Farm.[18] In the 1830s this was described as '13 miles from London, 3 from Uxbridge, 1 from Hayes and 2 from Cranford Bridge'.[19] Coincidentally, in 1779 Tattersall bought for £2500, for the purpose of breeding, 2nd Lord Bolingbroke's unbeaten Highflyer. Operations at Dawley were continued after his death by various other Tattersalls including his son George I (1792–1853), and perhaps grandson George II (1817-1849).[20] The thoroughbred stallion Glencoe (1831–1857) stood at stud there in 1835. Middleton the 1825 Derby winner was there in 1832.[21] Influential sire Sir Hercules was sent there in 1833, and The Colonel in c. 1837.[19]
  • Sports impresario Simon Clegg was born in Harlington;
  • Former professional footballer and football manager Paul Goddard was born in Harlington;
  • Rev. Count Henry Jerome de Salis, DD, FRS, third son of the Jerome, 2nd Count de Salis, was appointed by his parents Game keeper of and for their said manor of Dally otherwise Dawley, near Hayes, Middlesex, from 13 June 1775;[23] His mother, the Hon. Mary Fane, later Madame de Salis, and then Countess de Salis (died 1785), had lived for a while in central Harlington in c. 1770, and then his parents seem to have purchased the Dawley Wall estate (now approximately Stockley Park and more), including Dawley House or its remains, from the heirs of Lord Uxbridge in 1772. Henry Jerome, his daughter, wife, parents, one brother, and nephew were all buried in the family vault in Harlington's churchyard.[24] Peter de Salis (1738-1807) acquired the site of Dawley House in 1797. In 1841 members of the de Salis family (Peter Fane de Salis (1799-1870) and his step-mother and half-brothers) owned together 533 acres in the parish. Most of this lay in the north, in or near the former park, but it also included Dawley Manor Farm, in the High Street,[17] The Gramophone Company (then Electric and Musical Industries Ltd.) acquired the site of Dawley House from Cecil Fane de Salis for an extension to their works across the road in 1929;[9]
  • John Kyte, (died 1537), Rector of Harlington until 1510, and then Bishop of Carlisle from 1520;[17]
  • Rev. Dr. Joseph Trapp, (1679–1747), rector of Harlington, 1733-1748, (also an academic, poet and pamphleteer);[25]
  • Both Chelsea (1970s until July 2005) and Queens Park Rangers (from 2005-) football clubs have used the Imperial College Sports Ground, (aka Harlington Sports Ground), just west of the village in Sipson Lane.

Sources[edit]

Shackle's Barn, Harlington, Middlesex, from the west, October 2014.
View of Harlington from within the Dawley Wall, looking south, June 2015.
  • Harlington and Harmondsworth, by Philip Sherwood, Tempus, Stroud, 2002;
  • The History of Dawley (Middlesex), by B.T. White, Hayes and Harlington Local History Society, 2001;
  • Victorian Harlington, Hayes and Harlington Local History Society, 1985;
  • De Salis Family : English Branch, by Rachel E. Fane De Salis, Higgs & Co., Henley-on-Thames, UK, 1934.
  • Eight Hundred Years of Harlington Parish Church in the County of Middlesex, Herbert Wilson, MA, Rector, Uxbridge, 1909.
  • An Historical Account of Those Parishes in the County of Middlesex, Which Are Not Described in the Environs of London, by the Rev. Daniel Lysons, London, 1800, page 125-135.

References[edit]

Harlington's church and garage, from the south-east, 2014.
Church of St. Jerome, Dawley, (west Hayes), consecrated 1934, designed by Harold Gibbons, (in June 2015). This on the very north-eastern edge of the parish, but serves much of Dawley and thus Harlington.
Wheat field beside the M4, once part of Dawley Manor Farm, at Harlington. July 2015. Looking to the south-east.
  1. ^ Susan Reynolds (ed.), A History of the County of Middlesex, vol. 3 (1962)
  2. ^ "Contact Us." Hellenic Imperial Airways. Retrieved on 10 May 2011. "London / United Kingdom Hellenic Imperial Airways Axis House 242 Bath Road Harlington UB3 5AY"
  3. ^ Eight Hundred Years of Harlington Parish Church in the County of Middlesex, Herbert Wilson, MA, Rector, Uxbridge, 1909.
  4. ^ Grid Reference Finder distance tools
  5. ^ A History of the County of Middlesex: Volume 3, Shepperton, Staines, Stanwell, Sunbury, Teddington, Heston and Isleworth, Twickenham, Cowley, Cranford, West Drayton, Greenford, Hanwell, Harefield and Harlington, Victoria County History, London, 1962.
  6. ^ A History of the County of Middlesex: Volume 3,, Victoria County History, London, 1962.
  7. ^ The History of Parliament: the House of Commons 1558-1603, edited by P.W. Hasler, 1981.
  8. ^ The History of Parliament: the House of Commons 1604-1629, ed. Andrew Thrush and John P. Ferris, 2010.
  9. ^ a b c d e f g A History of the County of Middlesex: Volume 3, Victoria County History (VCH), London, 1962.
  10. ^ A History of the County of Middlesex: Volume 3, (Shepperton, Staines, Stanwell, Sunbury, Teddington, Heston and Isleworth, Twickenham, Cowley, Cranford, West Drayton, Greenford, Hanwell, Harefield and Harlington). Victoria County History (VCH), London, 1962.
  11. ^ The History of Parliament: the House of Commons 1660-1690, ed. B.D. Henning, 1983.
  12. ^ The History of Parliament: the House of Commons 1690-1715, ed. D. Hayton, E. Cruickshanks, S. Handley, 2002.
  13. ^ Alexander Pope, by Leslie Stephen, 1880.
  14. ^ The Alexander Pope Encyclopedia, by Pat Rogers, Greenwood Publishing Group, 2004.
  15. ^ The History of Parliament: the House of Commons 1715-1754, edited by Rodney Sedgwick, 1970.
  16. ^ The History of Parliament: the House of Commons 1558-1603, ed. P.W. Hasler, 1981
  17. ^ a b c d An Historical Account of Those Parishes in the County of Middlesex, Which Are Not Described in the Environs of London, by the Rev. Daniel Lysons, London, 1800, page 125-135.
  18. ^ He now started a stud farm at Dawley in Middlesex, which, together with his reputation for integrity, became the cornerstone of his large fortune., Thomas Seccombe, DNB, 1898.
  19. ^ a b The Racing Calendar for the year 1833, by Edward & Charles Weatherby, London, 1834, page 561.
  20. ^ O.D.N.B.
  21. ^ The Racing Calendar for the year 1832, by Edward & Charles Weatherby, London, 1833, page 559.
  22. ^ The World of William Byrd: Musicians, Merchants and Magnates, by Mr John Harley, Ashgate, 2010, pages 122, 123 & 218.
  23. ^ Fane De Salis MSS.
  24. ^ Just outside the parish of Harlington at Goulds Green there was a house which the De Salis renamed Dawley Court, and lived there from 1835 until 1929 when it was sold and then demolished.
  25. ^ the clergy database