Hawthornden Prize

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The Hawthornden Prize is a British literary award that was established in 1919 by Alice Warrender[1], having been born at Hawthornden.[2] Authors under the age of 41[3] are awarded on the quality of their "imaginative literature" which can be written in either poetry or prose.[4] The Hawthornden Committee awards the Prize annually for a work published in the previous twelve months. There have been several gap years without a recipient (1945–57, 1959, 1966, 1971–73, and 1984–87).[5]

Unlike other major literary awards, the Hawthornden does not solicit submissions. It is also universal in its coverage of the literary, welcoming fiction, travel writing, artistic and historical works.[6]

The Hawthornden Prize, along with the James Tait Black Memorial Prizes, are Britain's oldest literary awards.[7] Monetarily, it is modest: it offered £100 in 1936, in 1995 was worth £2000 and by 2017 had increased to £15,000.[8][9][10] It is administered by the Hawthornden Trust set up by Warrender,[11] and sponsored by the private trust of Drue Heinz.[2]

Awards[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Hawthornden Prize". The Glasgow Herald. 1 June 1961. p. 23. Retrieved 29 August 2010.
  2. ^ a b https://www.theguardian.com/books/2017/jul/14/graham-swift-mothering-sunday-fiction-secretive-award-hawthornden-prize-drue-heinz
  3. ^ "Literary London – Woman Donor – Hawthornden Prize". The Sydney Morning Herald. 14 June 1934.
  4. ^ "Hawthornden Prize". The Gazette. 4 August 1944. p. 7. Retrieved 29 August 2010.
  5. ^ Moseley, Merritt. "The Hawthornden Prize". University of North Carolina. Archived from the original on 9 April 2011. Retrieved 16 May 2010.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Kevin Myers (26 May 2002). "This Constant Stream of English Life". The Telegraph. Retrieved 26 August 2013.
  7. ^ Brian W. Shaffer (2008). A Companion to the British and Irish Novel 1945 - 2000. John Wiley & Sons. p. 164. ISBN 978-1-4051-5616-5. Retrieved 26 August 2013.
  8. ^ "Waugh's 'Campion' and Campion Hall". Catholic Herald. 26 June 1936. Retrieved 26 August 2013.
  9. ^ Merriam-Webster's Encyclopedia of Literature. Merriam-Webster. January 1995. p. 523. ISBN 978-0-87779-042-6. Retrieved 26 August 2013.
  10. ^ The Guardian. 14 July 2017 https://www.theguardian.com/books/2017/jul/14/graham-swift-mothering-sunday-fiction-secretive-award-hawthornden-prize-drue-heinz. Retrieved 14 July 2017. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  11. ^ "Miss A H Warrender Trust for Hawthornden Prize". Office of the Scottish Charity Regulator. Retrieved 26 August 2013.
  12. ^ "Penned in the Margins | John McCullough wins the 2020 Hawthornden Prize for Literature". Retrieved 24 July 2020.
  13. ^ "Sue Prideaux wins the 2019 Hawthornden Prize for Literature". 11 July 2019.
  14. ^ Jenny Uglow wins the Hawthornden Prize for Literature 2018, Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  15. ^ [1] (German)
  16. ^ "Tessa Hadley wins Hawthornden Prize 2016 | the Bookseller".
  17. ^ "Colm Tóibín scoops Hawthornden Literature Prize". RTÉ News. 23 July 2015.
  18. ^ "About Posts Archive". Archived from the original on 8 August 2014. Retrieved 25 July 2014.
  19. ^ "Past event: Poetry reading and conversation, with Jamie McKendrick" Archived 27 October 2014 at the Wayback Machine, Oxford Brookes University.
  20. ^ "Award winning poet Jamie McKendrick among 'Creative Minds' to come to Birmingham", University of Birmingham, 17 October 2013.
  21. ^ "Award: The Hawthornden Prize for Literature". The Times. 19 July 2012. Retrieved 26 August 2013.

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