Jørn Andersen

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Jørn Andersen
SVA00 - Jørn Andersen 6422a.jpg
Andersen as Austria Salzburg manager during an Austrian Football First League match against Wiener Neustadt in October 2015
Personal information
Date of birth (1963-02-03) 3 February 1963 (age 54)
Place of birth Fredrikstad, Norway
Playing position Striker
Club information
Current team
North Korea (manager)
Youth career
1975–1982 Østsiden IL
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1982–1984 Fredrikstad FK 64 (25)
1985 Vålerenga IF 22 (23)
1985–1988 1. FC Nürnberg 78 (28)
1988–1990 Eintracht Frankfurt 54 (20)
1990–1991 Fortuna Düsseldorf 42 (5)
1991–1994 Eintracht Frankfurt 44 (13)
1994–1995 Hamburger SV 18 (1)
1995 Dynamo Dresden 7 (0)
1995–1997 FC Zürich 53 (2)
1997–1999 FC Lugano 43 (2)
1999–2001 FC Locarno 29 (0)
Total 454 (119)
National team
1985–1990 Norway 27 (5)
Teams managed
2001–2003 FC Luzern U21
2003–2004 Rot-Weiß Oberhausen
2005–2006 Borussia Mönchengladbach (assistant)
2007 Skoda Xanthi
2007–2008 Kickers Offenbach
2008–2009 Mainz 05
2010–2011 Larissa
2011–2012 Karlsruher SC
2015 Austria Salzburg
2016– North Korea
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.

Jørn Andersen (born 3 February 1963), sometimes written as Jörn, is a Norwegian football manager and former player. He is the current manager of North Korea's national football team.

Club career[edit]

Norway[edit]

Born in Fredrikstad, Jørn Andersen's career started at local team Østsiden where he remained until 1982. Subsequently, he moved to Fredrikstad and netted seven goals in 43 Norwegian Premier League appearances. The striker was transferred to Vålerenga ahead of the 1985 season. Andersen was able to score 23 goals in just 22 matches for the Oslo side.

Germany[edit]

In 1985, 1. FC Nürnberg signed the Norwegian. In 78 matches Andersen scored 28 goals before he moved to Eintracht Frankfurt. In 1990 Andersen became the first foreign player to be top goalscorer in a season with 18 goals in the Bundesliga.[1] In 1990–91 Andersen played for Fortuna Düsseldorf and returned to the Frankfurt side. After that spell he joined Hamburger SV (1994–95) and Dynamo Dresden to play in the Bundesliga.[2]

Switzerland[edit]

From Dresden, Andersen headed to Switzerland and FC Zürich in 1995, but was not successful as he scored only twice in 33 appearances. After the 1997–98 season he left FC Lugano to join FC Locarno.

International career[edit]

He made his debut for Norway in 1985 and earned 27 caps, scoring five goals.[3] His last international match was a European Championship qualifying match against Hungary in October 1990, coming on as a substitute for Jahn Ivar Jakobsen.

Managing career[edit]

Andersen became youth manager of FC Luzern and returned to Germany again to manage the then-second tier team Rot-Weiß Oberhausen from 2003 until 2004. After that spell he assisted Horst Köppel at Borussia Mönchengladbach.

In May 2007, he signed to Greek top-flight team Skoda Xanthi to manage them from 2007–08 on, but in June 2007 the contract was dissolved for private reasons.

Andersen as Karlsruher SC manager during a press conference in December 2011

In late 2007, he signed for 2. Bundesliga strugglers Kickers Offenbach, but was unable to save them from relegation.

On 20 May 2008, he signed a two-year deal with 2. Bundesliga outfit Mainz 05, and under his reign the team achieved promotion to the Bundesliga. Despite the team's success, Andersen was fired on 3 August 2009.

Mid December 2010, he was named manager of the Greek Super League team Larissa.[4] After on 24 days in office, where the team lost three league matches and was knocked out of the cup competition, without scoring a single goal, he was let go.[5]

Six months later, Andersen returned to Germany take charge of second division side Karlsruher SC.[6]

Andersen became manager of Austria Salzburg on 2 January 2015.[7]

After leaving Austria Salzburg in December 2015, Andersen was appointed as manager of North Korea in May 2016.[8] It had marked for the first time that a foreign manager was appointed as North Korea coach since 1991.

Personal life[edit]

He is the son of handball player Bjørg Andersen.[9]

Andersen became a German citizen in 1993. His son Niklas currently plays for lower-tier club SSVg Velbert. Andersen is married and lives in Bad Reichenhall in Bavaria, Germany.[10]

Managerial statistics[edit]

As of 12 November 2016[11][12]
Team From To Record
G W D L Win %
FC Luzern U21 2001 2003
Rot-Weiß Oberhausen 1 July 2003 28 October 2004 46 18 10 18 039.13
Skoda Xanthi 3 May 2007 10 June 2007 1 0 0 1 000.00
Kickers Offenbach 6 November 2007 30 June 2008 22 5 9 8 022.73
Mainz 05 1 July 2008 3 August 2009 40 22 9 9 055.00
Larissa 17 December 2010 9 January 2011 4 0 0 4 000.00
Karlsruher SC 6 November 2011 26 March 2012 13 2 2 9 015.38
Austria Salzburg 2 January 2015 2 December 2015 35 16 9 10 045.71
North Korea 11 May 2016 Present 8 6 1 1 075.00
Total 168 68 40 60 040.48

Honours[edit]

Individual

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ballesteros, Frank; Arnhold, Matthias (21 April 2011). "(West) Germany - Top Scorers". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 5 February 2011. 
  2. ^ Arnhold, Matthias (21 April 2011). "Jørn Andersen - Matches and Goals in Bundesliga". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 5 February 2011. 
  3. ^ "Norway – Record International Players". RSSSF. Archived from the original on 4 May 2013. Retrieved 17 January 2010. 
  4. ^ "Jørn Andersen fikk trenerjobb i Hellas" (in Norwegian). aftenposten.no. 21 December 2010. Retrieved 21 December 2010. 
  5. ^ "Jörn Andersen nach 24 Tagen entlassen" (in German). spiegel.de. 9 January 2010. Retrieved 1 July 2011. 
  6. ^ "Andersen übernimmt den KSC" [Andersen takes over KSC] (in German). DFL. 6 November 2011. Retrieved 6 November 2011. 
  7. ^ "Däne Andersen übernimmt Austria Salzburg" (in German). Österreich. 2 January 2015. Retrieved 6 January 2015. 
  8. ^ "NRK: Jørn Andersen ny landslagstrener for Nord-Korea". vg.no (in Norwegian). VG. 11 May 2016. Retrieved 11 May 2016. 
  9. ^ Henriksen, Petter (ed.). "Jørn Andersen". Store norske leksikon (in Norwegian). Oslo: Kunnskapsforlaget. Retrieved 21 December 2010. 
  10. ^ OVB24 GmbH (publisher) (15 July 2014). "Fußball-Camp mit Jörn Andersen". rosenheim24.de (in German). Retrieved 21 December 2015. 
  11. ^ "Jörn Andersen" (in German). kicker.de. Retrieved 2 May 2014. 
  12. ^ "Korea DPR – National teams". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved 24 September 2016. 

External links[edit]