Lakeland (electoral district)

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Lakeland
Alberta electoral district
Lakeland 2013 Riding.png
Lakeland in relation to other Alberta federal electoral districts as of the 2013 Representation Order.
Federal electoral district
LegislatureHouse of Commons
MP
 
 
 
Shannon Stubbs
Conservative
District created2013
First contested2015
Last contested2019
District webpageprofile, map
Demographics
Population (2016)[1]108,451
Electors (2019)78,525
Area (km²)[2]31,877
Pop. density (per km²)3.4
Census divisionsDivision No. 10, Division No. 12, Division No. 13
Census subdivisionsAthabasca, Bonnyville, Bonnyville No. 87, Lloydminster, St. Paul, St. Paul No. 19, Smoky Lake, Vegreville, Vermilion, Vermilion River

Lakeland is a federal electoral district in Alberta, Canada, that was represented in the House of Commons of Canada from 1997 to 2004, and again since 2015. Its name is derived from the area's topography (and the former Lakeland County). The district's largest communities are Bonnyville, St. Paul, and the Alberta part of Lloydminster.

History[edit]

The district was created in 1996 from the Beaver River and Vegreville ridings. It was abolished in 2003, with parts transferred to Vegreville—Wainwright and Westlock—St. Paul. A small part was transferred to Athabasca.

The riding was re-created in 2013 from these same districts (Athabasca having been renamed to Fort McMurray—Athabasca) with a new set of boundaries, no longer including the northerly communities of Lac La Biche and Cold Lake, but extending further west to the towns of Athabasca and Waskatenau. It is largely a successor to Vegreville—Wainwright.

Demographics[edit]

Its 2016 population was 108,451, a 3.7% increase from 2011.[3]

Members of Parliament[edit]

This riding has elected the following members of the House of Commons of Canada:

Parliament Years Member Party
Lakeland
Riding created from Beaver River and Vegreville
36th  1997–2000[nb 1]     Leon Benoit Reform
 2000–2000     Alliance
37th  2000–2003[nb 2]
 2003–2004     Conservative
Riding dissolved into Athabasca,
Vegreville—Wainwright, and Westlock—St. Paul
Riding re-created from Fort McMurray—Athabasca,
Vegreville—Wainwright, and Westlock—St. Paul
42nd  2015–2019     Shannon Stubbs Conservative
43rd  2019–present

In addition, Senator Martha Bielish designated "Lakeland" as her Senate division, representing the area as a Progressive Conservative from 1979 to 1990. She was Alberta's first female Senator.[4]

Election results[edit]

2015–present[edit]

Graph of election results in Lakeland (since 2011 (redistributed), minor parties that never got 2% of the vote or didn't run consistently are omitted)
2019 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Conservative Shannon Stubbs 48,314 83.9 +11.09
New Democratic Jeffrey Swanson 3,728 6.5 -3.56
Liberal Mark Watson 2,565 4.5 -9.19
People's Alain Houle 1,468 2.5 -
Green Kira Brunner 1,105 1.9 -0.44
Libertarian Robert McFadzean 251 0.4 -0.7
Veterans Coalition Roberta Marie Graham 147 0.3 -
Total valid votes/Expense limit 57,578 100.0
Total rejected ballots 198
Turnout 57,776 73.6
Eligible voters 78,525
Conservative hold Swing +7.33
Source: Elections Canada[5][6]
2015 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Conservative Shannon Stubbs 39,882 72.81 -6.19 $96,950.81
Liberal Garry Parenteau 7,500 13.69 +8.59 $5,761.06
New Democratic Duane Zaraska 5,513 10.06 -1.16 $8,006.40
Green Danielle Montgomery 1,283 2.34 -1.88
Libertarian Robert George McFadzean 601 1.10 $1,653.97
Total valid votes/Expense limit 54,779 100.00   $242,495.35
Total rejected ballots 155 0.28
Turnout 54,934 69.24
Eligible voters 79,334
Conservative notional hold Swing -7.39
Source: Elections Canada[7][8]
2011 federal election redistributed results[9]
Party Vote %
  Conservative 32,529 78.99
  New Democratic 4,621 11.22
  Liberal 2,100 5.10
  Green 1,740 4.23
  Others 191 0.46

1997–2004[edit]

2000 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Alliance Leon Benoit 29,348 65.45 +6.17 $46,423
Liberal Wayne Kowalski 9,050 20.18 +2.54 $40,607
Progressive Conservative Paul Pelletier 4,373 9.75 –8.06 $4,991
New Democratic Raymond Stone 2,069 4.61 +0.18 $3,570
Total valid votes 44,840 100.0  
Total rejected ballots 132 0.29
Turnout 44,972 63.65
Alliance hold Swing +1.82
1997 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % Expenditures
Reform Leon Benoit 23,214 59.28 $46,821
Progressive Conservative Les Parsons 6,976 17.81 $29,332
Liberal Hansa Thaleshvar 6,911 17.64 $27,199
New Democratic John Williams 1,737 4.43 $992
Independent Valerie Doreen Morrow 321 0.81 $5,106
Total valid votes 39,159 100.0  
Total rejected ballots 97 0.25
Turnout 39,256 56.61

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The Reform Party merged with the Canadian Alliance on 27 March 2000.
  2. ^ The Canadian Alliance merged with the Progressive Conservatives to form the Conservative Party on 8 December 2003.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Statistics Canada: 2016
  2. ^ Statistics Canada: 2011
  3. ^ Statistics Canada (July 1, 2016). "Census Profile, 2016 Census: Lakeland".
  4. ^ "200 Remarkable Alberta Women".[permanent dead link]
  5. ^ "List of confirmed candidates". Elections Canada. Retrieved October 4, 2019.
  6. ^ "Election Night Results". Elections Canada. Retrieved November 6, 2019.
  7. ^ "October 19, 2015 Election Results — Lakeland (Validated results)". Elections Canada. 22 October 2015. Retrieved 4 November 2015.
  8. ^ Elections Canada – Preliminary Election Expenses Limits for Candidates Archived 2015-08-15 at the Wayback Machine
  9. ^ Pundits' Guide to Canadian Elections

External links[edit]