Calgary Heritage

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Calgary Heritage
Alberta electoral district
Canada 2013 48007 Calgary Heritage.svg
Boundaries of Calgary Heritage as of the 2013 Representation Order
Federal electoral district
LegislatureHouse of Commons
MP
 
 
 
Bob Benzen
Conservative
District created2013
First contested2015
Last contested2019
District webpageprofile, map
Demographics
Population (2011)[1]108,320
Electors (2019)81,736
Area (km²)[1]70
Pop. density (per km²)1,547.4
Census divisionsDivision No. 6
Census subdivisionsCalgary

Calgary Heritage is a federal electoral district in Alberta, Canada, that has been represented in the House of Commons of Canada since 2015.

Calgary Heritage was created by the 2012 federal electoral boundaries redistribution and was legally defined in the 2013 representation order. It came into effect upon the calling of the 2015 Canadian federal election, which was held that 19 October. It is essentially a reconfigured version of Calgary Southwest, the former riding of Stephen Harper, who served as the Prime Minister of Canada from 2006 until his party was defeated in 2015. Territory from the former Calgary Southwest comprises 99% of the new riding, while territory from Calgary Southeast makes up 1%.[2]

While Calgary as a whole has long been considered heartland for the Conservative Party of Canada and its antecedents, Calgary Heritage is located in a particularly conservative area of Calgary. Its predecessor, Calgary Southwest, frequently gave Conservative candidates some of the highest margins in the nation. Had it existed under its current boundaries in 2011, Harper would have won over 74 percent of the vote.

While Harper was handily re-elected to this riding in the 2015 election, his Conservatives lost their bid for a fresh mandate.[3] Harper resigned as prime minister on November 4, 2015, shortly before the new prime minister Justin Trudeau's inauguration. Harper resigned as MP for Calgary Heritage on August 26, 2016.[4] A by-election to fill the seat was held on April 3, 2017; Bob Benzen retained it for the Conservatives.

Geography[edit]

The riding is located in the southwestern corner of Calgary. It contains the neighbourhoods of Bayview, Braeside, Bridlewood, Canyon Meadows, Cedarbrae, Chinook Park, Eagle Ridge, Evergreen, Haysboro, Kelvin Grove, Kingsland, Lakeview, North Glenmore Park (south of Glenmore Trail), Oakridge, Palliser, Pump Hill, Shawnee Slopes, Southwood, Woodbine and Woodlands.

Demographics[edit]

According to the Canada 2011 Census[5][6]

Ethnic groups: 75.9% White, 5.8% Filipino, 4.7% Chinese, 3.1% South Asian, 2.4% Aboriginal, 2.2% Latin American, 2.1% Black
Languages: 74.9% English, 3.7% Chinese, 3.0% Tagalog, 2.3% Spanish, 1.9% Russian, 1.8% French, 1.1% German
Religions: 61.6% Christian (26.1% Catholic, 7.7% United Church, 4.8% Anglican, 2.9% Christian Orthodox, 2.5% Lutheran, 1.5% Presbyterian, 1.5% Baptist, 1.3% Pentecostal, 12.6% Other Christian), 2.5% Muslim, 2.4% Jewish, 1.2% Hindu, 31.4% None.
Median income: $39,383 (2010)
Average income: $57,511 (2010)

Riding associations[edit]

Riding associations are the local branches of political parties:

Party Association Name CEO HQ Address
Conservative Calgary Heritage Conservative Association Barb Zabrowski 2525 Woodview Drive SW
Green Calgary Heritage Federal Green Party Association Kelly J. Christie 491 Queen Charlotte Road SE
Liberal Calgary Heritage Federal Liberal Association Eric Peters 1301-8880 Horton Road SW
New Democratic Calgary Heritage Federal NDP Riding Association Roger Moreau 648 Parkvalley Road SE

Members of Parliament[edit]

This riding has elected the following members of the House of Commons of Canada:

Parliament Years Member Party
Calgary Heritage
Riding created from Calgary Southeast and Calgary Southwest
42nd  2015–2016     Stephen Harper Conservative
 2017–2019 Bob Benzen
43rd  2019–present

Election results[edit]

Graph of election results in Calgary Heritage (minor parties that never got 2% of the vote or didn't run consistently are omitted)
2019 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Conservative Bob Benzen 40,817 70.7 -0.79
Liberal Scott Forsyth 8,057 14.0 -7.71
New Democratic Holly Heffernan 5,278 9.1 +6.21
Green Allie Tulick 2,027 3.5 +1.72
People's Stephanie Hoeppner 1,123 1.9 -
Independent Hunter Mills 228 0.4 -
Christian Heritage Larry R. Heather 185 0.3 -1.11
Total valid votes/Expense limit 57,715 100.0
Total rejected ballots 260
Turnout 57,975 70.9
Eligible voters 81,736
Conservative hold Swing +3.46
Source: Elections Canada[7][8]


Canadian federal by-election, April 3, 2017
Resignation of Stephen Harper
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Bob Benzen 19,389 71.49 +7.72
Liberal Scott Forsyth 5,889 21.71 −4.26
New Democratic Khalis Ahmed 784 2.89 −4.39
Green Taryn Knorren 484 1.78 −0.35
Christian Heritage Jeff Willerton 383 1.41
Libertarian Darcy Gerow 113 0.42
National Advancement Stephen J. Garvey 79 0.29
Total valid votes/Expense limit 27,121 100.0   –  
Total rejected ballots -
Turnout
Eligible voters 81,036
Conservative hold Swing +4.70


2015 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Conservative Stephen Harper 37,263 63.77 –10.65 $105,821.13
Liberal Brendan Miles 15,172 25.97 +18.50 $46,125.76
New Democratic Matt Masters 4,255 7.28 –4.84 $38,181.16
Green Kelly Christie 1,246 2.13 –3.37 $7,044.83
Libertarian Steven Paolasini 246 0.42 $170.00
Independent Larry R. Heather 114 0.20 $16.50
Independent Korry Zepik 73 0.12 $1,098.48
Independent Nicolas Duchastel de Montrouge 61 0.10 $277.12
Total valid votes/Expense limit 58,430 100.00   $215,236.37
Total rejected ballots 228 0.39
Turnout 58,658 73.13
Eligible voters 80,213
Conservative hold Swing –14.58
Source: Elections Canada[9][10]
2011 federal election redistributed results[11]
Party Vote %
  Conservative 34,761 74.38
  New Democratic 5,663 12.12
  Liberal 3,485 7.46
  Green 2,568 5.50
  Others 255 0.55

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Statistics Canada: 2011
  2. ^ Report – Alberta
  3. ^ http://www.macleans.ca/politics/ottawa/when-does-justin-trudeau-become-prime-minister/
  4. ^ Levitz, Stephanie (August 26, 2016). "Stephen Harper leaves politics, gives up House of Commons seat". CBC News. Retrieved August 26, 2016.
  5. ^ http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/nhs-enm/2011/dp-pd/prof/details/page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo1=FED2013&Code1=48007&Data=Count&SearchText=Calgary%20Heritage&SearchType=Begins&SearchPR=01&A1=All&B1=All&Custom=&TABID=1
  6. ^ http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/nhs-enm/2011/dp-pd/prof/details/page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo1=FED2013&Code1=48007&Data=Count&SearchText=Calgary%20Heritage&SearchType=Begins&SearchPR=01&A1=All&B1=All&Custom=&TABID=1#tabs2
  7. ^ "List of confirmed candidates". Elections Canada. Retrieved October 4, 2019.
  8. ^ "Election Night Results". Elections Canada. Retrieved November 8, 2019.
  9. ^ "October 19, 2015 Election Results — Calgary Heritage (Validated results)". Elections Canada. 20 October 2015. Retrieved 4 November 2015.
  10. ^ Elections Canada – Preliminary Election Expenses Limits for Candidates Archived 2016-03-04 at the Wayback Machine
  11. ^ Pundits' Guide to Canadian Elections