Lambertville, New Jersey

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Lambertville, New Jersey
City of Lambertville
Delaware and Raritan Canal in Lambertville
Delaware and Raritan Canal in Lambertville
Map of Lambertville in Hunterdon County. Inset: Location of Hunterdon County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Lambertville in Hunterdon County. Inset: Location of Hunterdon County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Lambertville, New Jersey Interactive map of Lambertville, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Lambertville, New Jersey
Interactive map of Lambertville, New Jersey
Lambertville is located in Hunterdon County, New Jersey
Lambertville
Lambertville
Location in Hunterdon County
Lambertville is located in New Jersey
Lambertville
Lambertville
Location in New Jersey
Lambertville is located in the United States
Lambertville
Lambertville
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 40°22′07″N 74°56′35″W / 40.368563°N 74.943049°W / 40.368563; -74.943049Coordinates: 40°22′07″N 74°56′35″W / 40.368563°N 74.943049°W / 40.368563; -74.943049[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Hunterdon
IncorporatedMarch 1, 1849
Named forJohn Lambert
Government
 • TypeFaulkner Act (small municipality)
 • BodyCity Council
 • MayorJulia Fahl (D, term ends December 31, 2021)[3][4]
 • AdministratorVacant
 • Municipal clerkCynthia L. Ege[5]
Area
 • Total1.23 sq mi (3.17 km2)
 • Land1.08 sq mi (2.81 km2)
 • Water0.14 sq mi (0.36 km2)  11.46%
Area rank482nd of 565 in state
21st of 26 in county[1]
Elevation82 ft (25 m)
Population
 • Total3,906
 • Estimate 
(2019)[11]
3,801
 • Rank416th of 566 in state
13th of 26 in county[12]
 • Density3,386.1/sq mi (1,307.4/km2)
 • Density rank193rd of 566 in state
2nd of 26 in county[12]
Time zoneUTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
Area code(s)609 exchanges: 397, 773[15]
FIPS code3401938610[1][16][17]
GNIS feature ID0885271[1][18]
Websitewww.lambertvillenj.org

Lambertville is a city in Hunterdon County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the city's population was 3,906,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 38 (+1.0%) from the 3,868 counted in the 2000 Census, which had declined by 59 (-1.5%) from the 3,927 counted in the 1990 Census.[19]

Lambertville is on the Delaware River in southwestern Hunterdon County. In the 18th century, the area was named after various operators of ferries across the river to Pennsylvania, ultimately becoming known as Coryell's Ferry, after its owner, Emanuel Coryell. Coryell's Ferry was the western terminus of the New Jersey portion of York Road (which became U.S. Route 202), connecting New York City and Philadelphia. The community was named Lambertville in 1810, when the post office was established, in honor of John Lambert, a resident who had served as United States senator and acting governor of New Jersey, and who was responsible for the opening of the post office.[20][21][22]

History[edit]

Originally settled by the Lenape (Delaware) Native Americans, a 150,000-acre (230 sq mi; 610 km2) area around Lambertville was acquired for 700 Pounds by the Council of West Jersey and divided into smaller plots. The earliest European settler in present-day Lambertville was John Holcome, who purchased a lot and built a stone home in 1724.[20]

Emanuel Coryell bought a property in the area in 1732. He received a charter to operate a ferry connecting what is now Lambertville and New Hope, and opened a tavern and inn to host travelers stopping halfway along the route between New York City and Philadelphia. The settlements on either side of the Delaware River were each called Coryell's Ferry. During the American Revolutionary War, George Washington and his colonial forces camped in the city.[20]

The Delaware River and the Delaware and Raritan Canal were instrumental in the early prosperity of Lambertville. In June 1834, the opening of the canal was celebrated with a barge ride from Trenton to Lambertville. The canal's completion was not without hardship. 4,000 Irish immigrants were hired to dig the canal with pick and shovel.[20] During the construction, an epidemic of cholera broke out in 1832 and dozens of men were buried along the banks of the canal and the Delaware.[23]

Lambertville was originally incorporated as a town by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 1, 1849, from portions of West Amwell Township. It was reincorporated as a city on March 26, 1872.[24]

In the 19th century, due to its proximity to the canal and the Belvidere Delaware Railroad, Lambertville became a factory town. The range of products extended from underwear to rubber bands. After the introduction of motorized vehicles made the canal obsolete, the factories began shutting down. Some lasted into the 1970s. The railroad continued to serve as a vital freight carrier until the mid-1970s. Later, the Black River and Western Railroad acquired the line into town and operated short-distance local freight trains and scenic tourist passenger excursion trains into the late 1990s.[25]

Starting in the early 1980s, with pioneers including the Jonsdottir art gallery, Hamilton Grill and the Lambertville Station eatery (a hotel soon followed), the city began to attract artists and other creative types. These days, much of the town's 18th- and 19th-century flavor remains, including many restored houses. The town has become a tourist destination, with many shops, galleries, restaurants, and B&Bs. The canal path offers cyclists, joggers and walkers a level place to exercise and enjoy views of the canal and Delaware River in all seasons.[26]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city had an area of 1.23 square miles (3.17 km2), including 1.08 square miles (2.81 km2) of land and 0.14 square miles (0.36 km2) of water (11.46%).[1][2]

The city borders the municipalities Delaware Township and West Amwell Township in Hunterdon County and New Hope and Solebury Township across the Delaware River in Bucks County, Pennsylvania.[27][28][29]

Lock on the feeder canal for the Delaware and Raritan Canal in Lambertville

The Delaware and Raritan Canal flows through the western half of Lambertville, parallel to the Delaware River. Sections of the Delaware and Raritan Canal State Park are also in the city, with trails and bridges.

Climate[edit]

Lambertville's climate is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally cold winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Lambertville has a humid continental climate, abbreviated "Dfa" on climate maps.[30]

Climate data for Lambertville, NJ
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 40
(4)
43
(6)
52
(11)
64
(18)
74
(23)
83
(28)
87
(31)
86
(30)
79
(26)
67
(19)
56
(13)
45
(7)
64.666
(18.15)
Average low °F (°C) 18
(−8)
20
(−7)
27
(−3)
37
(3)
46
(8)
56
(13)
61
(16)
59
(15)
52
(11)
40
(4)
31
(−1)
23
(−5)
39.166
(3.98)
Source: [31]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18501,417
18602,69990.5%
18703,84242.3%
18804,1838.9%
18904,142−1.0%
19004,63712.0%
19104,6570.4%
19204,6600.1%
19304,518−3.0%
19404,447−1.6%
19504,4770.7%
19604,269−4.6%
19704,3592.1%
19804,044−7.2%
19903,927−2.9%
20003,868−1.5%
20103,9061.0%
2019 (est.)3,801[11][32]−2.7%
Population sources: 1850-1920[33]
1850-1870[34] 1850[35] 1870[36]
1880-1890[37] 1890-1910[38]
1910-1930[39] 1930-1990[40]
2000[41][42] 2010[8][9][10]

2010 Census[edit]

The 2010 United States census counted 3,906 people, 1,958 households, and 897 families in the city. The population density was 3,386.1 per square mile (1,307.4/km2). There were 2,075 housing units at an average density of 1,798.8 per square mile (694.5/km2). The racial makeup was 91.30% (3,566) White, 1.95% (76) Black or African American, 0.20% (8) Native American, 1.31% (51) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 4.12% (161) from other races, and 1.13% (44) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 9.75% (381) of the population.[8]

Of the 1,958 households, 15.3% had children under the age of 18; 36.0% were married couples living together; 6.8% had a female householder with no husband present and 54.2% were non-families. Of all households, 41.4% were made up of individuals and 14.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 1.98 and the average family size was 2.72.[8]

13.7% of the population were under the age of 18, 5.9% from 18 to 24, 26.9% from 25 to 44, 36.1% from 45 to 64, and 17.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 47.3 years. For every 100 females, the population had 95.8 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 93.6 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $71,532 (with a margin of error of +/- $7,040) and the median family income was $100,952 (+/- $14,554). Males had a median income of $57,596 (+/- $17,671) versus $53,869 (+/- $30,408) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $47,684 (+/- $6,399). About 2.3% of families and 6.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.8% of those under age 18 and 5.1% of those age 65 or over.[43]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 3,868 people, 1,860 households, and 939 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,408.6 people per square mile (1,321.6/km2). There were 1,961 housing units at an average density of 1,728.1 per square mile (670.0/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 94.65% White, 1.94% African American, 0.34% Native American, 1.06% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 0.90% from other races, and 1.06% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.10% of the population.[41][42]

There were 1,860 households, out of which 18.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 40.3% were married couples living together, 7.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 49.5% were non-families. 38.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. 3.7% have unmarried partners. The average household size was 2.06 and the average family size was 2.82.[41][42]

In the city the population was spread out, with 15.4% under the age of 18, 6.1% from 18 to 24, 32.4% from 25 to 44, 30.9% from 45 to 64, and 15.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43 years. For every 100 females, there were 94.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.2 males.[41][42]

The median income for a household in the city was $52,647, and the median income for a family was $80,669. Males had a median income of $47,313 versus $40,369 for females. The per capita income for the city was $36,267. About 4.5% of families and 5.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.5% of those under age 18 and 12.3% of those age 65 or over.[41][42]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Lambertville City Hall, which was constructed in 1871 and has been preserved by the New Jersey Historic Trust[44]

Lambertville is the only city in Hunterdon County, and describes itself as one of the smallest cities in the United States.[3] It is governed within the Faulkner Act (formally known as the Optional Municipal charter Law) under the Small Municipality form of government (Plan C), which is available only for municipalities with a population of under 12,000, and was implemented in Lambertville by direct petition as of January 1, 1983.[45] This form of government is used by 18 municipalities (of the 565) statewide and is available to municipalities with fewer than 12,000 residents at the time of adoption.[46] The government comprises the mayor and the four-member city council, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis in the November general elections. The mayor is elected directly by the voters to a three-year term of office. Council members serve a term of three years, which are staggered so that two seats come up for election in two years in a three-year cycle, with the mayoral election in the third year.[6]

The mayor exercises executive power; presides over the council with voice and vote, but has no veto power; appoints council committees; appoints the municipal clerk, attorney, tax assessor, tax collector and treasurer, all with council confirmation. The council exercises legislative power and approves the mayor's appointees.

As of 2020, Lambertville's mayor is Democrat Julia Fahl, whose term of office ends December 31, 2021. Members of the city council are president Elizabeth "Beth" Asaro (D, 2020), Wardell M. Sanders Jr. (D, 2022), Julia Taylor (D, 2022) and Madeline Urbish.[3][47][48][49][50][51][52] In December 2019, the council selected Urbish to fill the seat expiring in December 2020 that Elaine Warner had held until she resigned earlier that month.[53]

In November 2018, the city council appointed Julia Taylor to fill the seat expiring in December 2019 that became vacant following the resignation the previous month of Steven M. Stegman, who left office to focus on family issues.[54][55]

In the 2020 City Council primary elections, incumbents Asaro and Urbish lost to challengers Stegman and Benedetta Lambert (D). Stegman and Lambert won the general election on November 3rd and were sworn in at the City's annual reorganization meeting on January 5, 2021.[56]

On July 29, 2020, Fahl fired Business Administrator Alex Torpey while Torpey was engaged in an employment separation negotiation with the City Council [3]. Torpey subsequently filed suit against the City, alleging the termination violated N.J.S.A. 40A:9-138 "Administrator; removal from office", and alleged numerous workplace hostility, sexual harassment, and ethics violations by Fahl under the New Jersey Conscientious Employee Act and New Jersey Law Against Discrimination.[57][58] As of January 22, 2021, the matter is being heard in Superior Court of New Jersey Chancery Division: Hunterdon County.

Critical commentary about the lawsuit from the community on social media resulted in the City banning public comments on its official Facebook page.[59][60][61]

On January 14, 2021, Fahl announced she will not seek reelection.[62]

On January 19, 2021, the Borough of Flemington canceled the service agreement to share Business Administrators with Lambertville. [63]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Lambertville is in the 7th Congressional District[64] and the 15th state legislative district.[9][65][66] Before the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 census, it was in the 23rd state legislative district[67] and the 12th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the 2012 elections.[67]

For the 117th United States Congress. New Jersey's Seventh Congressional District is represented by Tom Malinowski (D, Rocky Hill).[68] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2027)[69] and Bob Menendez (North Bergen, term ends 2025).[70][71]

For the 2020–2021 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 15th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Shirley Turner (D, Lawrence Township, Mercer County) and in the General Assembly by Verlina Reynolds-Jackson (D, Trenton) and Anthony Verrelli (D, Hopewell Township, Mercer County, New Jersey).[72][73]

Hunterdon County is governed by a five-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, who serve three-year terms of office at-large on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats up for election each year on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. At an annual reorganization meeting held each January, the freeholders select one member to serve as the board's Director and another to serve as Deputy Director.[74] As of 2015, Hunterdon County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director John King (R; Raritan Township, 2015),[75] Freeholder Deputy Director Suzanne Lagay (R; Holland Township, 2016),[76] J. Matthew Holt (R; Clinton Town, 2015),[77] John E. Lanza (R; Flemington, 2016)[78] and Robert G. Walton (R; Hampton, 2017).[79][80] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Mary H. Melfi (R; Flemington, 2017),[81] Sheriff Fredrick W. Brown (R; Alexandria Township, 2016)[82] and Surrogate Susan J. Hoffman (R; Kingwood Township, 2018).[83][84][85]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were 3,053 registered voters in Lambertville, of whom 1,395 (45.7%) were registered Democrats, 569 (18.6%) were registered Republicans and 1,087 (35.6%) were unaffiliated. Two voters were registered to other parties.[86]

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 71.8% of the vote (1,684), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney's 26.7% (627), and other candidates' 1.5% (35), among the 2,361 ballots cast by the city's 3,296 registered voters (15 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 71.6%.[87][88] In the 2008 presidential election, Obama received 71.1% of the vote (1,744), ahead of Republican John McCain's 26.8% (658) and other candidates' 1.4% (35), among the 2,453 ballots cast by the city's 3,099 registered voters, for a turnout of 79.2%.[89] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 68.1% of the vote (1,495), outpolling Republican George W. Bush's 30.8% (677) and other candidates' 0.5% (15), among the 2,195 ballots cast by the city's 2,738 registered voters, for a turnout of 80.2%.[90]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Democrat Barbara Buono received 54.7% of the vote (798), ahead of Republican Chris Christie's 43.4% (633), and other candidates' 2.0% (29), among the 1,501 ballots cast by the city's 3,231 registered voters (41 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 46.5%.[91][92] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 59.5% of the vote (1,068), ahead of Christie's 31.2% (560), Independent Chris Daggett's 6.6% (118) and other candidates' 0.7% (12), among the 1,795 ballots cast by the city's 3,036 registered voters, yielding a 59.1% turnout.[93]

Transportation[edit]

US 202 in Lambertville

As of May 2010, Lambertville had 16.67 miles (26.83 km) of roadways, of which 12.77 miles (20.55 km) were maintained by the municipality, 0.70 miles (1.13 km) by Hunterdon County, 3.09 miles (4.97 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 0.11 miles (0.18 km) by the Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission.[94]

U.S. Route 202 is the most prominent highway to pass through Lambertville.[95] Other major roads that pass through include Route 29,[96] Route 165[97] and CR 518.[98][99]

No interstates pass through, but there are several nearby, such as Interstate 78 in Franklin Township and Interstate 295 in Hopewell Township.

The Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission operates the toll-free New Hope-Lambertville Toll Supported Bridge that connects PA 179 in New Hope, Pennsylvania, with NJ 179. Constructed in 1904 as the third bridge on the site, the bridge stretches 1,053 feet (321 m) across the Delaware River. The original bridge, designed by Lewis Wernwag, was constructed in 1814 and destroyed in 1841. A second bridge completed in 1842 was destroyed by flooding in 1903.[100]

Education[edit]

The South Hunterdon Regional School District serves students in pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade from Lambertville, Stockton and West Amwell Township.[101] Each of the three municipalities had their own school through sixth grade, until the Stockton school was closed after the 2017-18 school year;[102] public school students in seventh through twelfth grades attend a shared high school in Lambertville.[103] As of the 2018–19 school year, the district, comprised of three schools, had an enrollment of 925 students and 108.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 8.6:1.[104] Schools in the district (with 2018–19 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[105]) are Lambertville Public School[106] with 225 students in grades PreK-6, West Amwell School[107] with 224 students in grades K-6 and South Hunterdon Regional High School[108] with 458 students in grades 7-12.[109][110]

In a special election held in September 2013, voters from Lambertville, Stockton and West Amwell Township passed referenda to dissolve the South Hunterdon Regional High School District and to combine the three existing school districts from each municipality (Lambertville City School District, Stockton Borough School District and West Amwell Township School District), with majorities in each community passing both ballot items. A single combined regional PreK-12 district was created, with property taxes levied under a formula in which 57% is based on property values and 43% on the number of students. The executive county superintendent appointed an interim board of education for the new regional district, which was responsible for implementing the merger.[111]

Prior to the creation of the South Hunterdon district, students had attended Lambertville High School, which was constructed in 1854 and abandoned in the 1950s, and has since been the subject of various legends described in Weird NJ.[112]

Eighth grade students from all of Hunterdon County are eligible to apply to attend the high school programs offered by the Hunterdon County Vocational School District, a county-wide vocational school district that offers career and technical education at its campuses in Raritan Township and at programs sited at local high schools, with no tuition charged to students for attendance.[113]

Community[edit]

Annually, in April or May, the city celebrates the return of the shad, a fish popular in the area. The festival includes vendors' booths and others of the like focusing on the area arts community.[114]

Dining[edit]

Lambertville is known for an array of dining opportunities, ranging from casual family owned to eclectic and upscale options. There are over 40 reviewed and rated restaurants in the area, including Marhaba Middle Eastern Restaurant, Full Moon, D'Floret, Hamilton's Grill Room, Bell's Tavern, Anton's at the Swan and Brian's.

Historic sites[edit]

Lambertville has several properties listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The James W. Marshall House was added in 1970. The Delaware and Raritan Canal, which flows through the city, was added as a historic district in 1973. The Lambertville House was added in 1978. Nearly the entire city was listed as the Lambertville Historic District in 1983. The Kalmia Club was added in 2012.[115]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Lambertville include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f 2019 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 1, 2020.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990 , United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ a b c Mayor and Council Members, Borough of Lambertville. Accessed May 6, 2020. "Lambertville is the only city in Hunterdon County, and one of the smallest cities in the United States. It is governed within the Faulkner Act (formally known as the Optional Municipal Charter Law) under the Small Municipality form of government (Plan C), which is available only for municipalities with a population of under 12,000, and was implemented in Lambertville by direct petition as of January 1, 1983. The government consists of a Mayor and a four-member City Council, with all positions elected at-large in partisan elections."
  4. ^ 2020 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed February 1, 2020.
  5. ^ City Clerk, City of Lambertville. Accessed May 5, 2020.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 103.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: City of Lambertville, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 7, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Lambertville city, Hunterdon County, New Jersey Archived February 12, 2020, at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 18, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Sorted by 2011-2020 Legislative District, New Jersey Department of State. Accessed February 1, 2020.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Lambertville city Archived July 23, 2014, at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed March 18, 2012.
  11. ^ a b Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Minor Civil Divisions in New Jersey: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2019, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2020.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey Archived February 12, 2020, at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Lambertville, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed March 18, 2012.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed December 17, 2013.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Lambertville, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed December 17, 2013.
  16. ^ a b U.S. Census website , United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  17. ^ Geographic codes for New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed September 1, 2019.
  18. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  19. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  20. ^ a b c d History, Lambertville Historical Society. Accessed November 20, 2019. "Their descendant, John Lambert, served in the United States Senate during Thomas Jefferson’s administration. He persuaded the Postal Service to open an office at Coryell’s Ferry. His nephew, Captain John Lambert, was appointed postmaster and his inn was designated as the post office. Having procured a post office for Coryell’s Ferry, the Lamberts renamed the village Lambert’s Ville in 1810."
  21. ^ Hutchinson, Viola L. The Origin of New Jersey Place Names, New Jersey Public Library Commission, May 1945. Accessed September 2, 2015.
  22. ^ Gannett, Henry. The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States, p. 180. United States Government Printing Office, 1905. Accessed September 2, 2015.
  23. ^ "Honoring the Irish Who Built the D&R Canal DEP Commissioner Campbell and Senator Codey Dedicate an Irish Immigrant Memorial", New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, press release dated March 17, 2003. Accessed November 20, 2019. "Department of Environmental Protection's (DEP) Commissioner Bradley M. Campbell today joined Democratic Senate President Richard J. Codey to dedicate a memorial honoring the hardships and triumphs of the people who built the Delaware & Raritan Canal, many of whom were Irish immigrants.... Many of the canal workers died during the cholera epidemic of 1832, and were buried in unmarked graves along the canal."
  24. ^ "The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606–1968", John P. Snyder, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 156.
  25. ^ History of the Black River & Western Railroad, Black River and Western Railroad. Accessed November 29, 2015.
  26. ^ Lawlor, Julia. "If You're Thinking of Living In/Lambertville, N.J.; Not-So-Urban Renewal for a River Town", The New York Times, May 14, 2000. Accessed December 25, 2017. "She found all three in Lambertville, an old New Jersey river town of 4,300 tucked into the southwest corner of Hunterdon County that has undergone a striking rebirth in the last 20 years.... A former mill town that covers just over a square mile, Lambertville is full of Victorian and Federal-style brick row houses and brownstones, many with ornate woodwork, high ceilings and other period details still intact. In the last 15 years it has also become a weekend tourist stop for New Yorkers and Philadelphians who are drawn by block after block of antique shops, art galleries, restaurants and B & B's."
  27. ^ Areas touching Lambertville, MapIt. Accessed February 25, 2020.
  28. ^ Map of County Municipalities, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed November 15, 2019.
  29. ^ New Jersey Municipal Boundaries, New Jersey Department of Transportation. Accessed November 15, 2019.
  30. ^ Climate Summary for Lambertville, New Jersey, Weatherbase.
  31. ^ Lambertville, NJ (08530), Weather.com. Accessed September 15, 2016.
  32. ^ Census Estimates for New Jersey April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2019, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2020.
  33. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed July 13, 2013.
  34. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 268, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed July 13, 2013. "The town of Lambertville contained in 1850, 1,417 inhabitants; in 1860, 2,699; and in 1870, 3,842. It was incorporated as a town April 13, 1868."
  35. ^ Debow, James Dunwoody Brownson. The Seventh Census of the United States: 1850, p. 137. R. Armstrong, 1853. Accessed July 13, 2013.
  36. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 259. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed July 13, 2013.
  37. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 98. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed November 15, 2012.
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