List of Seattle Mariners seasons

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The Seattle Mariners have played in Safeco Field since July 15, 1999.

The Seattle Mariners have completed 39 seasons of professional baseball in the West division of Major League Baseball (MLB)'s American League (AL) since they began play in 1977. From 1977 until June 27, 1999, the Mariners played in Seattle's Kingdome. Since July 15, 1999, the Mariners have played at Safeco Field.[1] Their name reflects their home city's coastal and marine culture.

An expansion team created as a result of a breach of contract lawsuit involving the Seattle Pilots' 1969 departure after just one year in Seattle,[2] the Mariners finished each of their first 14 seasons with a losing record. However, after Seattle won its division and a playoff berth for the first time in 1995, they have enjoyed sporadic success, making the playoffs three more times but never advancing beyond the American League Championship Series (ALCS).

For complete team history, see History of the Seattle Mariners.

Table Key[edit]

ALDS
American League Division Series
ALCS
American League Championship Series
MVP
Most Valuable Player Award
CYA
Cy Young Award
ROY
Rookie of the Year Award
MOY
Manager of the Year Award
CB POY
Comeback Player of the Year Award
WS MVP
World Series Most Valuable Player Award

Regular season results[edit]

World Series champions AL champions Division champions Wild card berth (1995–present)
MLB
season
Team
season
Level League Division Regular season Post-season Awards
Finish[a] Wins[b] Losses Win% GB[c]
1977 1977 MLB AL West 6th 64 98 .395 38
1978 1978 MLB AL West 7th 56 104 .350 35
1979 1979 MLB AL West 6th 67 95 .414 21
1980 1980[d] MLB AL West 7th 59 103 .364 38
1981[e] 1981[d] MLB AL West 6th 44 65 .404 20
1982 1982 MLB AL West 4th 76 86 .469 17
1983 1983 MLB AL West 7th 60 102 .370 39
1984 1984 MLB AL West 5th 74 88 .457 10 Alvin Davis (ROY)[3]
1985 1985 MLB AL West 6th 74 88 .457 17
1986 1986 MLB AL West 7th 67 95 .414 25
1987 1987 MLB AL West 4th 78 84 .481 7
1988 1988 MLB AL West 7th 68 93 .422 35
1989 1989 MLB AL West 6th 73 89 .451 26
1990 1990 MLB AL West 5th 77 85 .475 26
1991 1991 MLB AL West 5th 83 79 .512 12
1992 1992 MLB AL West 7th 64 98 .395 32
1993 1993 MLB AL West 4th 82 80 .506 12
1994 1994 MLB AL West 3rd 49 63 .438 2 Playoffs cancelled[f]
1995 1995 MLB AL West 1st 79 66 .545 Won ALDS (Yankees) 3–2
Lost ALCS (Indians) 4–2[4]
Randy Johnson (CYA)[3]
Lou Piniella (MOY)[3]
1996 1996 MLB AL West 2nd 85 76 .528
1997 1997 MLB AL West 1st 90 72 .556 Lost ALDS (Orioles) 3–1[5] Ken Griffey, Jr. (MVP)[3]
1998 1998 MLB AL West 3rd 76 85 .472 11½
1999 1999 MLB AL West 3rd 79 83 .488 16
2000 2000 MLB AL West 2nd 91 71 .562 ½ Won ALDS (White Sox) 3–0
Lost ALCS (Yankees) 4–2[6]
Kazuhiro Sasaki (ROY)[3]
2001 2001 MLB AL West 1st 116[g] 46 .716 Won ALDS (Indians) 3–2
Lost ALCS (Yankees) 4–1[7]
Ichiro Suzuki (MVP, ROY)[3]
Lou Piniella (MOY)[3]
2002 2002 MLB AL West 3rd 93 69 .574 10
2003 2003 MLB AL West 2nd 93 69 .574 3
2004 2004 MLB AL West 4th 63 99 .389 29
2005 2005 MLB AL West 4th 69 93 .426 26
2006 2006 MLB AL West 4th 78 84 .481 15
2007 2007 MLB AL West 2nd 88 74 .543 6
2008 2008 MLB AL West 4th 61 101 .377 39
2009 2009 MLB AL West 3rd 85 77 .525 12
2010 2010 MLB AL West 4th 61 101 .377 29 Félix Hernández (CYA)[8]
2011 2011 MLB AL West 4th 67 95 .414 29
2012 2012 MLB AL West 4th 75 87 .463 19
2013 2013 MLB AL West 4th 71 91 .438 25
2014 2014 MLB AL West 3rd 87 75 .537 11 Chris Young (CB POY)
2015 2015 MLB AL West 4th 76 86 .469 12
2016 2016 MLB AL West 84 74 .532
Totals Wins Losses Win%
2822 3209 .468 All-time regular season record (1977–2014)
15 19 .441 All-time postseason record
2837 3228 .468 All-time regular and postseason record

See also[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  • a The Finish column lists regular season results and excludes postseason play.
  • b The Wins and Losses columns list regular season results and exclude any postseason play. Regular and postseason records are combined only at the bottom of the list.
  • c The GB column lists "Games behind" from the team that finished in first place that season. It is determined by finding the difference in wins plus the difference in losses divided by two. Half-game increments are possible because games can be cancelled (most often due to rain).
  • d In both the 1980 and 1981 seasons, the Mariners played one game which ended in a tie not reflected in the above table. On June 2, 1980, in Detroit, the Mariners were tied with the Tigers 3–3 after 13 innings; the game was suspended due to rain and never replayed because neither team was in playoff contention.[9] On April 29, 1981, the Mariners played an 8 inning game with the Minnesota Twins that was called due to rain with the score tied at 7; it was also never replayed.[10] In 2007, the Major League Baseball Rules Committee announced that tied games would no longer be replayed from the start but instead suspended and resumed.[11]
  • e The 1981 Major League Baseball strike caused the season to be split into two halves.[12]
  • f The 1994–95 Major League Baseball strike, which started on August 12, led to the cancellation of the playoffs and World Series.[13] As a result of the abbreviated season, MLB did not officially award division championships.[14] Although they spent the entire shortened season with a losing record, the Mariners held first place in their division before ten games until as late as May 25, when three of the four AL West teams were tied.[15]
  • g The team's 116 wins tied a major-league record initially held by the 1906 Chicago Cubs.[16] However, the Mariners played ten more games than the 1906 Cubs.

References[edit]

General
Specific
  1. ^ "Safeco Field". MLB.com. Retrieved August 11, 2009. 
  2. ^ Arnold, Kirby (2007). Tales from the Seattle Mariners. Champaign, Illinois: Sports Publishing LLC. p. 5. ISBN 1-58261-831-3. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g "Mariners Awards". Mariners.com. Retrieved 2009-08-13. 
  4. ^ "1995 Seattle Mariners". Baseball-Reference. Retrieved 2009-08-11. 
  5. ^ "1997 League Division Series – BAL vs. SEA". Baseball-Reference. Retrieved 2009-08-12. 
  6. ^ "2000 Seattle Mariners". Baseball-Reference. Retrieved 2009-08-12. 
  7. ^ "2001 Seattle Mariners". Baseball-Reference. Retrieved 2009-08-12. 
  8. ^ Greg Johns (18 November 2010). "Felix is King of AL pitchers, taking Cy Young". MLB.com. Retrieved 18 November 2010. 
  9. ^ "Retrosheet Boxscore: Detroit Tigers 3, Seattle Mariners 3". Retrosheet. Retrosheet, Inc. Retrieved 2009-08-12. 
  10. ^ "Retrosheet Boxscore: Minnesota Twins 7, Seattle Mariners 7". Retrosheet. Retrosheet, Inc. Retrieved 2009-08-12. 
  11. ^ Bodley, Hal (February 18, 2007). "Ties in baseball called out by rules committee". USA Today. Retrieved 2009-08-12. 
  12. ^ Kaplan, Jim (August 10, 1981). "Let The Games Begin". Sports Illustrated. Time, Inc. Retrieved 2009-08-12. 
  13. ^ "Strike looms large over All-Star Game". CNN Sports Illustrated. Associated Press. 2002-07-07. Retrieved 2009-08-11. 
  14. ^ Newhan, Ross (1994-10-06). "A Season Without Titles Baseball: Players will be honored, but there will be no divisional champions because of the shortened schedule". Los Angeles Times. p. C3. 
  15. ^ "Standings on Wednesday, May 25, 1994". Baseball-Reference. Retrieved 2009-08-11. 
  16. ^ .Chass, Murray (October 23, 2001). "ON BASEBALL; Playoff Fade Turns Mariners Into a Footnote". The New York Times. p. S2. Retrieved 2009-08-13.