New York City Department of Citywide Administrative Services

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Department of Citywide Administrative Services
Department overview
Jurisdiction New York City
Headquarters One Centre Street,
17th Floor South
New York, NY 10007[1]
Department executive
  • Lisette Camilo[2], Commissioner of Citywide Administrative Services
Key document
Website www.nyc.gov/dcas

The New York City Department of Citywide Administrative Services (DCAS) is the department of the government of New York City that manages, leases, and purchases city real property; operates, manages, and repairs courthouses and other city-owned public buildings; administers an energy conservation program; purchases supplies, materials and equipment for use by city agencies; is responsible for citywide fleet management including operation and maintenance of a motor vehicle pool; and supports government recruitment.[3][4] It also publishes The City Record, the official journal of New York City.[5] Its regulations are compiled in title 55 of the New York City Rules.

DCAS Law Enforcement[edit]

The New York City Department of Citywide Administrative Services has a law enforcement branch to protect DCAS facilities and personnel. DCAS officers are Special Officers of New York City, under New York State Criminal Procedure law, chapter subdivision 27, §2.10,[6] which gives them limited powers of New York State peace officers.

History[edit]

The New York City Department of Citywide Administrative Services was created in 1996 when Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani merged the Department of General Services and the Department of Personnel.[7] The Department of Citywide Administrative Services Law Enforcement special Officers was started in 1996 with approximately 10 special officers assigned to various DCAS facilities.

Commissioners[edit]

Chapter 35, section 810 of the New York City Charter states "There shall be a department of citywide administrative services, the head of which shall be the commissioner of citywide administrative services."[3]

Name Dates in Office Mayoral Administration Notes and References
William J. Diamond August 10, 1996 – December 31, 2001 Rudolph W. Giuliani [7]
Martha K. Hirst January 1, 2002 – by January 2011 Michael R. Bloomberg [8]
Edna Wells Handy by January 2011 – by January 2014 Michael R. Bloomberg [9]
Stacey Cumberbatch January 24, 2014 – by January 2016 Bill De Blasio [10]
Lisette Camilo January 5, 2016 – current Bill De Blasio [11]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://nyc.gov/html/dcas/html/contact/contact.shtml
  2. ^ http://nyc.gov/html/dcas/html/agencyinfo/commissionerspage.shtml
  3. ^ a b "New York City Charter" (PDF). nyc.gov. City of New York. Retrieved 8 October 2016. 
  4. ^ "New York City Department of Citywide Administrative Services". New York City Department of Citywide Administrative Services. Retrieved 2010-02-28. 
  5. ^ "About DCAS - The City Record". New York City Department of Citywide Administrative Services. Retrieved 13 June 2014. 
  6. ^ "New York Criminal Procedure Law § 2.10. Persons designated as peace officers". findlaw.com. Thomson Reuters Westlaw. Retrieved 9 October 2016. 
  7. ^ a b "Giuliani Appoints Three Commissioners". New York Times. August 11, 1996. Retrieved 8 October 2016. 
  8. ^ Cooper, Michael (December 28, 2001). "Bloomberg Appoints Five To Be City Commissioners". New York Times. Retrieved 8 October 2016. 
  9. ^ Otterman, Sharon (February 2, 2011). "City Workers Face Penalty After Storm". New York Times. p. A18. Retrieved 8 October 2016. 
  10. ^ Taylor, Kate (January 25, 2014). "New Commissioner Has Ties to 'Sherlock,' via Barbados". New York Times. p. A12. Retrieved 8 October 2016. 
  11. ^ Goodman, J. David (January 6, 2016). "De Blasio Names Herminia Palacio as Deputy Mayor for Health and Human Services". New York Times. p. A21. Retrieved 8 October 2016. 

External links[edit]