Newberg, Oregon

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Newberg
Newberg, Oregon
City Hall
City Hall
Flag of Newberg
Flag
Motto(s): 
A Great Place to Grow!
Location in Oregon
Location in Oregon
Coordinates: 45°18′18″N 122°58′2″W / 45.30500°N 122.96722°W / 45.30500; -122.96722Coordinates: 45°18′18″N 122°58′2″W / 45.30500°N 122.96722°W / 45.30500; -122.96722
CountryUnited States
StateOregon
CountyYamhill
Incorporated1889
Government
 • MayorBob Andrews
Area
 • Total5.81 sq mi (15.05 km2)
 • Land5.81 sq mi (15.05 km2)
 • Water0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation
175 ft (53 m)
Population
 • Total22,068
 • Estimate 
(2013)[3]
22,508
 • Density3,798.3/sq mi (1,466.5/km2)
Time zoneUTC-8 (Pacific)
 • Summer (DST)UTC-7 (Pacific)
ZIP code
97132
Area code(s)503
FIPS code41-52100[4]
GNIS feature ID1166686[5]
WebsiteCity of Newberg

Newberg is a city in Yamhill County, Oregon, United States. Located in the Portland metropolitan area, the city is home to George Fox University. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 22,110 [6] making it the second most populous city in the county.

History[edit]

Ewing Young, after leading pioneering fur brigades in California, came to Portland in 1834 and settled on the west bank of the Willamette River near the mouth of Chehalem Creek, opposite of Champoeg.[7] Young's home is believed to be the first house built by European-Americans on that side of the river.[7] Later, Joseph Rogers settled near the Willamette River at what is now Newberg in 1848.[8][9] The community was known early on as Chehalem, and later as Roger's Landing for Rogers who founded the settlement, and who died in 1855.[8] In 1883, the community was platted.[8] Incorporated in 1889, a community tradition states that this town was named by its first postmaster, Sebastian Brutscher, for his former hometown of Neuberg in Germany One of the current streets, Brutscher Street, is named after Brutscher.

Newberg was one of the first communities in Oregon to hold Quaker services. It was incorporated as a city in 1889. The city's oldest surviving newspaper, The Newberg Graphic, was established Dec. 1, 1888. Friends Pacific Academy, renamed Pacific College in 1891 and then George Fox University in 1949, was founded by the Quakers in 1885. George Fox University is classified by U.S. News & World Report as a first-tier regional university and "Best Value" school.[10] The campus resides in the center of the city, surrounded by university-owned housing.

Herbert Hoover moved to the city in 1885,[11][12] to live with his uncle and aunt after the death of his parents and was one of the first students to attend his uncle's Pacific Academy [13] The home has been turned into the Hoover-Minthorn House museum.

The town was "dry", meaning no alcohol could be sold within the city limits, for a good part of its early history.

Geography[edit]

Newberg is located on Oregon Route 99W about 25 miles (40 km) southwest of Portland, Oregon. Springbook, once a separate community, is now considered part of Newberg.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 5.81 square miles (15.05 km2), all of it land.[1] It averages 176 feet (54 m) in elevation.

Climate[edit]

Climate data for Newberg, Oregon
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 46
(8)
51
(11)
56
(13)
61
(16)
67
(19)
73
(23)
79
(26)
80
(27)
75
(24)
64
(18)
52
(11)
46
(8)
63
(17)
Average low °F (°C) 34
(1)
35
(2)
37
(3)
40
(4)
45
(7)
51
(11)
54
(12)
54
(12)
50
(10)
43
(6)
39
(4)
35
(2)
43
(6)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 5.83
(148)
4.84
(123)
4.06
(103)
2.79
(71)
2.25
(57)
1.62
(41)
0.68
(17)
0.84
(21)
1.64
(42)
2.92
(74)
6.07
(154)
6.41
(163)
39.95
(1,015)
Source: The Weather Channel[14]

Demographics[edit]

Newberg Friends Church
Historical population
Census Pop.
1890514
190094583.9%
19102,260139.2%
19202,56613.5%
19302,95115.0%
19402,9600.3%
19503,94633.3%
19604,2046.5%
19706,50754.8%
198010,39459.7%
199013,08625.9%
200018,06438.0%
201022,06822.2%
Est. 201623,306[15]5.6%
Sources:[3][4][16][17][18]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 22,068 people, 7,736 households, and 5,398 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,798.3 inhabitants per square mile (1,466.5/km2). There were 8,265 housing units at an average density of 1,422.5 per square mile (549.2/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 85.9% White, 0.8% African American, 0.8% Native American, 2.2% Asian, 0.2% Pacific Islander, 7.0% from other races, and 3.1% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 13.5% of the population.

There were 7,736 households of which 37.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.1% were married couples living together, 12.0% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.7% had a male householder with no wife present, and 30.2% were non-families. 23.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.66 and the average family size was 3.12.

The median age in the city was 32.8 years. 25.2% of residents were under the age of 18; 13.8% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 27.1% were from 25 to 44; 21.9% were from 45 to 64; and 12% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 48.6% male and 51.4% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 18,064 people, 6,099 households, and 4,348 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,599.4 people per square mile (1,389.4/km²). There were 6,435 housing units at an average density of 1,282.2 per square mile (494.9/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 90.49% White, 0.35% African American, 0.64% Native American, 1.04% Asian, 0.17% Pacific Islander, 5.06% from other races, and 2.24% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 10.52% of the population.

There were 6,099 households out of which 40.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.5% were married couples living together, 11.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.7% were non-families. 21.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.76 and the average family size was 3.20.

In the city, the population was spread out with 27.7% under the age of 18, 15.0% from 18 to 24, 29.8% from 25 to 44, 16.9% from 45 to 64, and 10.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 30 years. For every 100 females, there were 93.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.8 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $44,206.00, and the median income for a family was $51,084. Males had a median income of $34,099 versus $23,571 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,873. About 4.3% of families and 6.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.0% of those under age 18 and 6.1% of those age 65 or over.

Economy[edit]

George Fox University campus

As of 2002, dental equipment manufacturer A-dec was the city's largest employer with 832 employees, and George Fox University was second with 400.[19] The next largest employers were SP Newsprint Co., Suntron Corp., and Providence Newberg Medical Center.[19] Upon opening in September 2009,[20] The Allison Inn and Spa, a 77-room destination hotel, spa, and restaurant employs approximately 200 full-time workers. A Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation inpatient addiction treatment center is located in the city.[21]

Museums and other points of interest[edit]

Education[edit]

Newberg is served by the Newberg School District, which has six elementary schools, two middle schools, and two high schools, Newberg High School and Catalyst Alternative High School. The town also has two private Christian schools (Veritas School and C. S. Lewis Academy). The city also is home to George Fox University, and a new campus of Portland Community College opened in fall 2011.

Media[edit]

Transportation[edit]

Road[edit]

OR 99W.svg
OR 99W (formerly US 99W) is a major north-south route which follows an east-west alignment through Newberg. It connects with Portland to the northeast, Dundee and McMinnville to the southwest, and the western Willamette Valley to the south. In combination with OR 18, this is the main route for traffic between Portland and the central Oregon Coast.
OR 219.svg
OR 219 is a north-south route connecting with St. Paul and Woodburn to the south, and Scholls and Hillsboro to the north.
OR 240.svg
OR 240 is an east-west route connecting with OR 47 in the town of Yamhill.

Air[edit]

Rail[edit]

Converted Russell traction engine of the Pacific Brick Face Co. in 1907

Newberg is served by the Portland & Western Railroad which offers freight service as needed. The railroad was originally part of the Southern Pacific Railroad and was built in the 1870s. Newberg has not had regular passenger railroad service since the 1930s; however there have been several studies to consider bringing commuter rail service to the Portland metropolitan area.

Notable people[edit]

Sister cities[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2012-01-24. Retrieved 2012-12-21.
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-12-21.
  3. ^ a b "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2014-10-03.
  4. ^ a b c "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  6. ^ [1]
  7. ^ a b Hussey, John A. (1967). Champoeg: Place of Transition, A Disputed History. Oregon Historical Society.
  8. ^ a b c Klooster, Karl (February 14, 2009). "Back in time: Yamhill Valley - 1859". News-Register. Archived from the original on 14 July 2011. Retrieved 2 February 2010.
  9. ^ Lewis A. McArthur (1991). Oregon Place Names, 6th edition. Portland, Oregon: Oregon Historical Society. ISBN 978-0-87595-237-6.
  10. ^ "'About George Fox University: Quick Facts'". georgefox.edu. Retrieved 2012-08-14.
  11. ^ newbergoregon.gov/newberg/history
  12. ^ Walch, Timothy. “Hoover, Herbert Clark.” The World Book Encyclopedia, 2015th ed., vol. 9, World Book, Inc., a Scott Fetzer Company, 2015, p. 326.
  13. ^ [2]
  14. ^ "Monthly Averages for Newberg, OR". Weather.com. Retrieved March 24, 2018.
  15. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  16. ^ "Population-Oregon" (PDF). 15th Census of the United States. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 27 November 2013.
  17. ^ "Number of Inhabitants: Oregon" (PDF). 18th Census of the United States. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013.
  18. ^ "Pennsylvania: Population and Housing Unit Counts" (PDF). U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013.
  19. ^ a b "Newberg Community Profile". Oregon Economic & Community Development Department. Archived from the original on 2007-08-17. Retrieved 2009-05-08.
  20. ^ http://www.foodandwine.com/articles/trendsetting-travel-best-travel-values-around-the-americas
  21. ^ "Springbrook Campus". Hazelden. Retrieved January 16, 2015.

External links[edit]

Media related to Newberg, Oregon at Wikimedia Commons