Provinces of Ethiopia

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The 13 provinces after Bale split from Hararghe in 1960
The 30 regions of the People's Democratic Republic of Ethiopia period, 1987-1991
Map of the provinces of Ethiopia in 1935. Derived from Perham, Margery (1969). The Government of Ethiopia.

Ethiopia was divided into provinces, further subdivided into awrajjas or districts, until they were replaced by regions (kililoch) and chartered cities in 1992.

Provinces[edit]

Ethiopia was divided into 12 provinces (taklai ghizat) by Imperial Ethiopian Government Decree No. 1 of 1942 and later amendments.[1] The 12 provinces were:

Bale was created as a 13th province when it was split off from Hararghe in 1960. Eritrea was annexed by Ethiopia and made a 14th province in 1962.[1]

When the Derg took power in 1974 they relabeled the provinces as regions (kifle hager).[2] By 1981 Addis Ababa had become a separate administrative division from Shewa, and Aseb was split off from Eritrea in 1981, making 16 administrative divisions in total.[3]

Under the 1987 Constitution of Ethiopia, the military rule of the Derg evolved into the civilian government of the People's Democratic Republic of Ethiopia, and chapter 8 of the Constitution determined that the state would be subdivided into "autonomous regions" and "administrative regions". Chapter 9 gave to the National Shengo (the legislature) the power to establish the regions.[4] The Shengo established the regions in Proclamation No. 14 of 1987, on 18 September. There were thirty regions, consisting of five autonomous regions, and twenty-five administrative regions. The five autonomous regions were:[5]

The twenty-five administrative regions were:[6]

Older provinces, which are frequently used to indicate location within Ethiopia, include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Bereket Habte Selassie (1966). "Constitutional development in Ethiopia". Journal of African Law. 10 (2): 79. JSTOR 744683. 
  2. ^ Ofcansky, Thomas P.; Berry, LaVerle, eds. (1993). Country profile: Ethiopia (PDF). Federal Research Division, Library of Congress. p. 222. 
  3. ^ Ofcansky, Thomas P.; Berry, LaVerle, eds. (1993). Country profile: Ethiopia (PDF). Federal Research Division, Library of Congress. p. 334. 
  4. ^ "The Constitution of the People's Democratic Republic of Ethiopia". Review of Socialist Law. 14 (1): 181–208. 1988. doi:10.1163/187529888X00095. 
  5. ^ Ofcansky, Thomas P.; Berry, LaVerle, eds. (1993). Country profile: Ethiopia (PDF). Federal Research Division, Library of Congress. p. 223. 
  6. ^ Ofcansky, Thomas P.; Berry, LaVerle, eds. (1993). Country profile: Ethiopia (PDF). Federal Research Division, Library of Congress. p. xxiii.