SegaSoft

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SegaSoft
SegaSoft logo.png
Type of business Joint venture
Founded 1995; 23 years ago (1995)
Headquarters Redwood City, California, United States
Area served Worldwide
Owner
Founder(s) Sega Enterprise
CSK Corporation
Key people Isao Okawa
Michael Latham
Industry video game industry
Products video game publishing
Services Content delivery
Current status Inactive

SegaSoft, originally headquartered in Redwood City, California and later San Francisco, was a joint venture by Sega and CSK (Sega's majority stockholder at the time[1]), created in 1995 to develop and publish games for the PC and Sega Saturn,[2][3] primarily in the North American market.

In 1996, SegaSoft announced that they would be publishing games for all viable platforms, not just Saturn and PC.[4] This, however, never came to fruition and SegaSoft mainly focused on the PC.

SegaSoft disbanded in 2000 and many of the staff members were merged into Sega.com, a new company established to handle Sega's online presence in the United States.

SegaSoft was responsible for, among other things, the Heat.net multiplayer game system and publishing the last few titles made by Rocket Science Games.

Published games[edit]

Incomplete

Cancelled games[edit]

Heat.net[edit]

Unreal Tournament's game page and a private chat window

Heat.net, stylized HEAT.NET, was an online PC gaming system produced by SegaSoft. Heat.net hosted both Sega-published first- and second-party games, as well as popular third-party games of the era, such as Quake II and Baldur's Gate. Each supported game had its own chat lobby and game creation options. In addition, players could add friends and chat privately with them.

Heat.net was based on a licensed version of the MPlayer Internet multiplayer gaming system which was later bought by GameSpy. It branded itself as a peaceful alternative to real-world violence with advertising slogans such as "Total peace through cyberviolence" and "Kill pixels not people."

It featured a currency system where the player earned "degrees" through playing games, trivia contests (both game-related and general), viewing ads, or other actions. Degrees could be spent, but only by premium members, at Heat.net's online store, the Black Market[14], which had computer games and related merchandise. On May 6, 1999, SEGA announced it had partnered with Chips & Bits' online game superstore which allowed players a vast selection of games, hardware and even magazine subscriptions.[15]

The degree system was highly flawed and non-active players could leave their PCs logged into servers and earn degrees. Rooms were established for idle players to sit and earn degrees. Heat.net established "parking police" to discover these servers but players discovered other ways to falsely earn points.

Heat.net had a loyalty program, in which members, known as "Foot Soldiers", received shirts and Heat.net dog tags.

Heat.net was also the home a collegiate gaming league called HeatCIGL (College Internet Game League). Students from 1,100 registered schools would play Quake II or Unreal Tournament in teams representing their colleges, with play-offs at the end of the season. The championship team received $5,000. The league also gave away a $5,000 "Excellence in Gaming" College Scholarship. [16]

In September 2000, it was announced that Heat.net and HeatCIGL would be shutting down on October 31, 2000.

In June 2008, CNET hailed Heat.net as one of the greatest defunct websites in history.[17]

Partial list of games supported on Heat.Net[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Sega to Publish Games on PlayStation". Next Generation. No. 19. Imagine Media. July 1996. pp. 14–15. 
  2. ^ "Sega's Bold Leap to PC". Electronic Gaming Monthly. No. 78. Sendai Publishing. January 1996. p. 22. 
  3. ^ "Trailing Sony, Sega Restructures". GamePro. No. 89. IDG. February 1996. p. 16. 
  4. ^ "Sega Soft Plans PlayStation Titles". GamePro. No. 95. IDG. August 1996. p. 16. 
  5. ^ "Alien Race". Sega Soft. Archived from the original on February 3, 1999. Retrieved 16 March 2016. 
  6. ^ a b c "Virtual Makeover". Virtual Makeover. Archived from the original on February 8, 1999. Retrieved 16 March 2016. 
  7. ^ "Da Bomb". SegaSoft. Archived from the original on February 3, 1999. Retrieved 16 March 2016. 
  8. ^ "SegaSoft Goes Golfing". Gamespot. 
  9. ^ "Puzzle Castle". Adventure Legends. Retrieved 4 January 2017. 
  10. ^ "G.I. Ant (SegaSoft) [PC – Cancelled]". Unseen 64. Retrieved 4 January 2017. 
  11. ^ a b "SegaSoft Preps for E3". Gamespot. Retrieved 4 January 2017. 
  12. ^ "Interactive Movies Are Back!". Sega Saturn Magazine. No. 10. Emap International Limited. August 1996. p. 10. 
  13. ^ "Skies [PC Dreamcast – Cancelled]". Unseen 64. Retrieved 4 January 2017. 
  14. ^ "HEAT.NET Celebrates First Anniversary With 12-Hour Online Bash". SegaSoft. Archived from the original on 11 December 2000. Retrieved 29 December 2017. 
  15. ^ "Teen Gamers Can Now Purchase Online Without Credit Cards: HEAT.NET Frequent Player Points are as Good as Cash at Partner sites". SegaSoft. Archived from the original on 11 December 2000. Retrieved 29 December 2017. 
  16. ^ "GAME YOUR WAY THROUGH COLLEGE! HEATCIGL KICKS OFF SCHOOL YEAR WITH MORE CASH, CONTENT AND PRIZES THAN EVER BEFORE". SegaSoft. Archived from the original on 7 December 2000. Retrieved 29 December 2017. 
  17. ^ "The greatest defunct Web sites and dotcom disasters". CNET. 2008-06-05. Archived from the original on 2008-06-07. Retrieved 2008-06-05. 
  18. ^ "10six". 10six. Archived from the original on February 25, 1999. Retrieved 16 March 2016. 
  19. ^ "Web Illustration, Heat.net Trophy for Age of Empires II". RODWIN. Retrieved 30 December 2017. 
  20. ^ "Army Men™ II Storms Its Way Onto HEAT.NET". SegaSoft. Archived from the original on 11 December 2000. Retrieved 29 December 2017. 
  21. ^ "ANGELIC POWERS BATTLE HELL'S DEMONS ON HEAT.NET". SegaSoft. Archived from the original on 11 December 2000. Retrieved 29 December 2017. 
  22. ^ "HEAT.NET Strengthens Relationship With 3DO - Features Four Highly-Anticipated Games For 1999". SegaSoft. Archived from the original on 11 December 2000. Retrieved 29 December 2017. 
  23. ^ "SegaSoftTM Brings Seven Red-Hot New Titles to HEATTM". SegaSoft. Archived from the original on 11 December 2000. Retrieved 29 December 2017. 

External links[edit]