Talk:Ariwara no Narihira

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Other Narihira poems discussed by Keene that might be cited in the article later[edit]

Poem 622:

Japanese text[1] Romanized Japanese[2] English translation[2]
秋の野に
ささわけし朝の
袖よりも
あはでこし夜ぞ
ひちまさりける
aki no no ni
sasa wakeshi asa no
sode yori mo
awade koshi yo zo
hichi masarikeru
My sleeves are wetter
On a night spent without meeting
Than when one morning
I made my way through fields of
Autumnal growths of bamboo.

Poem 970:

Japanese text[3] Romanized Japanese[4] English translation[4]
わすれては
夢かとぞ思ふ
おもひきや
雪ふみわけて
君を見むとは
wasurete wa
yume ka to zo omou
omoiki ya
yuki fumiwakete
kimi wo min to wa
If perchance I forget
I wonder, "Was it a dream?"
Could I have supposed
I would make m way through snow
To see my lord in such a place?

Poem 133:

Japanese text[5] Romanized Japanese[6] English translation[6]
ぬれつつぞ
しひて折りつる
年の内に
春はいくかも
あらじとおもへば
nuretsutsu zo
shiite oritsuru
toshi no uchi ni
haru wa ikuka mo
araji to omoeba
Even if I got wet,
I was resolved to pick them,
Remembering that
Hardly any days of spring
Were still remaining this year.

Poem 617:

Japanese text[7] Romanized Japanese[8] English translation[8]
つれづれの
ながめにまさる
涙河
そでのみぬれて
逢ふよしもなし
tsurezure no
nagame ni masaru
namidagawa
sode nomi nurete
au yoshi mo nashi
Lost in idle brooding.
That swells with the long rains
A river of tears
That soaks only my sleeves:
There is no way to meet you.

Poem 618:

Japanese text[7] Romanized Japanese[9] English translation[9]
あさみこそ
袖はひつらめ
涙河
身さへ流ると
きかばたのまむ
asami koso
sode wa hizurame
namidagawa
mi sae nagaru to
kikaba tanoman
How shallow must be
A river of tears that soaks
No more than your sleeves;
If I hear that you yourself
Are adrift, I'll believe you.

Poem 410:

Japanese text[10] Romanized Japanese[9] English translation[9]
からころも
きつつなれにし
つましあれば
はるばるきぬる
旅をしぞ思ふ
karagoromo
kitsutsu narenishi
tsuma shi areba
harubaru kinuru
tabi wo shi zo omou
Because my dear wife
Is familiar as the skirt
Of a well-worn robe,
I feel as if I have come
A long distance on my way.

Poem 411:

Japanese text[11] Romanized Japanese[12] English translation[12]
名にしおはば
いざこととはむ
都鳥
わが思ふ人は
有りやなしやと
na ni shi owaba
iza koto towan
miyakodori
wa ga omou hito wa
ari ya nashi ya to
If you are faithful
To your name, I would ask you,
Bird of the city,
Is the woman I think of
Alive, or is she no more?

Poem 645:

Japanese text[13] Romanized Japanese[14] English translation[14]
君やこし
我やゆきけむ
思ほえず
夢かうつつか
ねてかさめてか
kimi ya koshi
ware ya yukiken
omōezu
yume ka utsutsu ka
nete ka samete ka
Did you come to me,
Or did I go to you?
I have no idea
A dream or reality?
Was I asleep or awake?

Poem 646:

Japanese text[15] Romanized Japanese[14] English translation[14]
かきくらす
心のやみに
迷ひにき
夢うつつとは
世人さだめよ
kakikurazu
kokoro no yami ni
mayoiniki
yume utsutsu to wa
yohito sadame yo
In the utter dark
Of a mind that obscures all
I have long wondered.
A dream or reality?
Let other people decide.

Narihira in setsuwa literature[edit]

Narihira was a recurring figure in later tale (setsuwa) literature,[citation needed] such as in tales 35 and 36 of Book 24 of the Konjaku Monogatarishū.[16]

GA Review[edit]

This review is transcluded from Talk:Ariwara no Narihira/GA1. The edit link for this section can be used to add comments to the review.

Reviewer: Sainsf (talk · contribs) 06:12, 24 June 2016 (UTC)

Will review. Sainsf (talk · contribs) 06:12, 24 June 2016 (UTC)

General
  • No copyvio/dablink/external link issues
  • Duplinks: I can see many, use this tool to fix them
    • Done—there are still a couple left, but they're redirects that could be turned into full articles. Curly Turkey 🍁 ¡gobble! 21:30, 24 June 2016 (UTC)
Lead
  • The lead should be a good 2 to 3 paras long for an article of this length covering all major points in the article
  • Say AD/BC in 825–880
    • Is that really necessary? There are no BC dates in recorded Japanese history. Curly Turkey 🍁 ¡gobble! 21:30, 24 June 2016 (UTC)
      • Whoops, didn't know that. But articles should generally mention AD/BC at first mention. May be someone who does not know of this, like me, will get confused. Sainsf (talk · contribs) 06:20, 25 June 2016 (UTC)
        • WP:ERA says, "In general, do not use CE or AD unless required to avoid ambiguity". Regardless, as the dates increase rather than decrease, any confusion would be temporary, I would imagine. Curly Turkey 🍁 ¡gobble! 11:15, 26 June 2016 (UTC)
Birth and ancestry
  • Begin the article with the full name of the person
  • Say AD/BC in the first line
Romantic affairs
  • You should add the names of one or a few of each of these parties of speculators you mention in the 2nd para. Presently "it has been" sounds vague on this.
    • Given the specualtion took place over many cneturies, that would be difficult. The sources used in the article don't name them, and hunting them down in mediaeval texts may constitute OR or SYNTH.
Poetry
  • Combined, poems attributed to Narihira in court anthologies total eighty-seven "87" would make this less wordy.
  • according to Rodd and Henkenius Who are they?
    • Literary scholars and translators. I've now qualified them. Curly Turkey 🍁 ¡gobble! 21:30, 24 June 2016 (UTC)

Thanks for the changes. The prose is excellent, I await you response to one last comment. Sainsf (talk · contribs) 06:20, 25 June 2016 (UTC)

Thanks for the clarification. I am happy to promote this. Sainsf (talk · contribs) 13:05, 26 June 2016 (UTC)
    • ^ Katagiri 2009 : 255-256.
    • ^ a b Keene 1999 : 225.
    • ^ Katagiri 2009 : 380.
    • ^ a b Keene 1999 : 227.
    • ^ Katagiri 2009 : 84.
    • ^ a b Keene 1999 : 228.
    • ^ a b Katagiri 2009 : 254.
    • ^ a b Keene 1999 : 229-230.
    • ^ a b c d Keene 1999 : 230.
    • ^ Katagiri 2009 : 184.
    • ^ Katagiri 2009 : 185.
    • ^ a b Keene 1999 : 231.
    • ^ Katagiri 2009 : 264.
    • ^ a b c d Keene 1999 : 232.
    • ^ Katagiri 2009 : 264-265.
    • ^ Mabuchi et al. 2001 : 605.