Talk:Mission School

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Former good article nominee Mission School was a Social sciences and society good articles nominee, but did not meet the good article criteria at the time. There are suggestions below for improving the article. Once these issues have been addressed, the article can be renominated. Editors may also seek a reassessment of the decision if they believe there was a mistake.
Article milestones
Date Process Result
October 30, 2006 Good article nominee Not listed
Did You Know

Classification[edit]

certainly fails GA nomination. this is not even a B class article. lacks organizaation, headings and breadth. hasnt been related well to other historical movements of art in calif. only has one reference! Anlace 21:36, 29 October 2006 (UTC)

Well, I think your assessment is a bit harsh here. One reference? No, there are about 9 sources given altogether, though all but one are simple links and are not listed in bibliographic format. That can be fixed, of course. Lacks subheadings - true, but its a short article. Lacks organization? How so? Specifics? Related well to to other art movements in California? As I stated, it is related to the "Lowbrow art" movement centered in Los Angeles, but trying to related to things like, say, the Bay Area Figurative Movement would be a bit artificial.

If this were an article about a multi-decade international art movement like Surrealism, I'd agree the coverage wouldn't be adequate, but a small (albeit influential) regional movement like this one? I think the article is at least B-class in its coverage of this subject, but I'm hardly the most objective reviewer. Peter G Werner 03:17, 30 October 2006 (UTC)
Harsh is my job as the article's outside observer. In any case i have never seen a B class article this brief--let alone GA. It just has a long way to go. Set aside the reference issue for a moment (i was just looking more for monographs, not such heavy reliance on web references), let's concentrate on format and content. The article certainly needs subheadings to help the reader navigate. But most importantly the article lacks breadth:

(now im getting into writing the article for you):

  • needs discussion of roots of movement. Dont tell me it grew out of nowhere or on the streets. i can see influences of artists from the 1960s and even earlier (eg Mexican Muralists)
  • if it is so influential, whom or what did it influence?
  • venue: is it just on the streets or in the museums as well. If in the museums, who started the serious collecting and what did reviewers say of the work? In any private galleries?

That's just a start. there are probably many other areas of expansion and breadth available if the movement is as important as you think. Dont get me wrong. I support practically any article on art. I just want our standards to be meaningful for art articles. Regards. Anlace 04:20, 30 October 2006 (UTC)

Good suggestions, and even if the article isn't GA-worthy yet, I appreciate the suggestions on how to bring it up. However, when you mention "venue: is it just on the streets or in the museums as well. If in the museums, who started the serious collecting and what did reviewers say of the work? In any private galleries?" – Did you read the article? I have a list of a number of San Francisco galleries (to which I probably should add New York's Deitch Projects) and one museum that are closely associated with this movement, as well as the participation of several of these artists in two Venice and Whitney Biennials. As for "web sources", well, these included the Glen Helfand article, as well as the Stretcher.org articles, which happened to be primary references on the subject. Peter G Werner 06:22, 30 October 2006 (UTC)

Failing GA[edit]

Hi,

I agree with the above editor's comments that this article is not yet at GA standard.

Points to resolve before renominating:

  • The page needs to have a coherent structure using headings as specificed by MoS
  • References should be placed using Inline citations - not just web links - this has been done correctly for one reference in the article already.
  • In places the prose is not compelling. Consider: "Though this art movement is generally considered to have emerged in the early 1990s around a core group of artists who attended or were associated with San Francisco Art Institute during this time, the term "Mission School" was not coined until 2002, in a San Francisco Bay Guardian article by Glen Helfand". The "during this time" is very clumsy and the sentence itself is overly long.
  • Hard to determine the stability of an article that was only created 2 days ago!

However, the article is good on the NPOV front and it is a good start, but I'm afraid on this occasion that it just doesn't cut the GA criteria.

Martin Hinks 11:58, 30 October 2006 (UTC)

Comments by CAMPSF[edit]

Aaron Noble was never considered part of "the 'Mission School' except for the article that appeared in Art In America. Wiki really needs to do a better job of its research before publishing!!! Likewise, Rigo23 was never considered a part of the Mission School except for the article by Glen Helfand. The best resource for defining THE MISSION SCHOOL is an essay that was written by Rene Pritikin for Amy Franchscini's book. Wiki should look into these before blindly publishing what you don't know. —Preceding unsigned comment added by CAMPSF (talkcontribs) 05:34, 23 February 2007

Egads! How to respond to these comments!
First, such commentary belongs here on the Talk pages, not in the middle of a Wikipedia article where you placed it. Second, when dealing with Wikipedia disputes it helps to maintain a civil tone, which you clearly are not doing here. Also, "Wiki" doesn't research anything – Wikipedia is writen by its editors – people like you and me – using published sources as a basis.
As for "blindly publishing what you don't know", I happend to have written most of this article and I stand by what I wrote. Wikipedia is supposed to be be derived from multiple, non-trivial, published, cited sources and that's what I've done here. Yes, I've drawn heavily on the Glen Helfand article (he counts both Rigo and Aaron Noble as "Mission School" artists, BTW). It just so happens that he was the first person to publish the term "Mission School", and the overwhelming consensus of subsequent literature is that the term "Mission School" is something he more or less defined, for better or worse. (I am aware of Renny Pritikin's article – you should note that I've linked to it under "References".)
I'll note that Wikipedia is based on published sources rather than original research. From your username, I take it you have some kind of connection with Clarion Alley Mural Project. I also gather you have some kind of beef with Glen Helfand. That's a valid opinion and I'm sure you have valid "insider" info on the "Mission School", but without reference to published sources, your opinion that Glen Helfand is wrong is just that – one person's unpublished opinion. Peter G Werner 07:41, 23 February 2007 (UTC)

Fair use rationale for Image:Kilgallengarage.jpg[edit]

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Image:Kilgallengarage.jpg is being used on this article. I notice the image page specifies that the image is being used under fair use but there is no explanation or rationale as to why its use in this Wikipedia article constitutes fair use. In addition to the boilerplate fair use template, you must also write out on the image description page a specific explanation or rationale for why using this image in each article is consistent with fair use.

Please go to the image description page and edit it to include a fair use rationale. Using one of the templates at Wikipedia:Fair use rationale guideline is an easy way to insure that your image is in compliance with Wikipedia policy, but remember that you must complete the template. Do not simply insert a blank template on an image page.

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BetacommandBot (talk) 17:21, 2 January 2008 (UTC)

Fair use rationale for Image:Mcgeegarage.jpg[edit]

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Image:Mcgeegarage.jpg is being used on this article. I notice the image page specifies that the image is being used under fair use but there is no explanation or rationale as to why its use in this Wikipedia article constitutes fair use. In addition to the boilerplate fair use template, you must also write out on the image description page a specific explanation or rationale for why using this image in each article is consistent with fair use.

Please go to the image description page and edit it to include a fair use rationale. Using one of the templates at Wikipedia:Fair use rationale guideline is an easy way to insure that your image is in compliance with Wikipedia policy, but remember that you must complete the template. Do not simply insert a blank template on an image page.

If there is other fair use media, consider checking that you have specified the fair use rationale on the other images used on this page. Note that any fair use images lacking such an explanation can be deleted one week after being tagged, as described on criteria for speedy deletion. If you have any questions please ask them at the Media copyright questions page. Thank you.

BetacommandBot (talk) 19:06, 2 January 2008 (UTC)

Fair use rationale for Image:Nerihorse.jpg[edit]

Nuvola apps important.svg

Image:Nerihorse.jpg is being used on this article. I notice the image page specifies that the image is being used under fair use but there is no explanation or rationale as to why its use in this Wikipedia article constitutes fair use. In addition to the boilerplate fair use template, you must also write out on the image description page a specific explanation or rationale for why using this image in each article is consistent with fair use.

Please go to the image description page and edit it to include a fair use rationale. Using one of the templates at Wikipedia:Fair use rationale guideline is an easy way to insure that your image is in compliance with Wikipedia policy, but remember that you must complete the template. Do not simply insert a blank template on an image page.

If there is other fair use media, consider checking that you have specified the fair use rationale on the other images used on this page. Note that any fair use images lacking such an explanation can be deleted one week after being tagged, as described on criteria for speedy deletion. If you have any questions please ask them at the Media copyright questions page. Thank you.

BetacommandBot (talk) 20:30, 2 January 2008 (UTC)

CAMP redirect is inappropriate and incorrect[edit]

Why is this article redirecting from the "Clarion Alley Mural Project"? The redirect should be removed. Cleshne (talk) 16:26, 5 August 2010 (UTC)

I don't see what was "inappropriate" about it in the least. There was no separate article on CAMP until you started one, so this article was a perfectly good place for it to redirect, since it at least had *some* information. CAMP started out as a project that largely involved so-called "Mission School" artists, though its probably expanded well beyond that by now. Peter G Werner (talk) 17:05, 5 August 2010 (UTC)

As another user commented above "Aaron Noble was never considered part of "the 'Mission School' except for the article that appeared in Art In America. Wiki really needs to do a better job of its research before publishing!!! Likewise, Rigo23 was never considered a part of the Mission School except for the article by Glen Helfand." I don't really mind the use of the term Mission School or the article, but I don't find it particularly meaningful or based in the reality of the diverse, vibrant, historical Mission District arts situation. I have noticed that various people have tried to add artists to this page, and the names have been removed. "Mission School" should not be the defining article for various projects - that is why I thought the re-direct was not appropriate.Cleshne (talk) 18:18, 5 August 2010 (UTC)

Blacklisted Links Found on the Main Page[edit]

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|User:Cyberbot II not sure how it was resolved, but the tag is back again as of November 13, 2014 - I removed the tag again today. Jooojay (talk) 21:35, 13 November 2014 (UTC)

Dan Plasma[edit]

A Dan Plasma red-link was listed as a Mission School artist in this article, while yes he does work in The Mission SF his style is quite different then the associated art movement. Today Dan Plasma was removed from the list, please add a reliable citation if you intend to add him back to the list. Thank you. 204.195.74.111 (talk) 07:10, 1 December 2014 (UTC)

Work to be done[edit]

Since this page has been adopted for the moment by the Intro to DH class at SFSU, let's figure out what needs to be done. From the points above:

  • needs discussion of roots of movement. Dont tell me it grew out of nowhere or on the streets. i can see influences of artists from the 1960s and even earlier (eg Mexican Muralists)
  • if it is so influential, whom or what did it influence?
  • venue: is it just on the streets or in the museums as well. If in the museums, who started the serious collecting and what did reviewers say of the work? In any private galleries?

And:

  • The page needs to have a coherent structure using headings as specificed by MoS
  • References should be placed using Inline citations - not just web links - this has been done correctly for one reference in the article already.
  • In places the prose is not compelling. Consider: "Though this art movement is generally considered to have emerged in the early 1990s around a core group of artists who attended or were associated with San Francisco Art Institute during this time, the term "Mission School" was not coined until 2002, in a San Francisco Bay Guardian article by Glen Helfand". The "during this time" is very clumsy and the sentence itself is overly long.

Do these critiques hold for the current page? Are additional edits needed?

Should we split editing into two groups - - substantive (matters of content) and form (formatting, style, etc.)? — Preceding unsigned comment added by Profhanley (talkcontribs) 17:59, 27 April 2016 (UTC)

Dig Hum Class suggestions[edit]

Carlos Santana, lead singer and front man for the band known as "Santana," is an alumni of the Mission School in San Francisco. The Huffington Post explored his relationship with the school in October of 2011. The article reads: "In the past, Mission High School has been among the lowest-scoring schools in the state. But Santana visited to congratulate students on their recent success: Last year, 84 percent of nearly 200 seniors were accepted to college. While the school still struggles with academic performance, Santana urged students to keep up the good work and get involved in their passions. “Turn off MTV,” he said. “Get into real life. Participate” (Wilkey, 2011). This is the link to the original article, which includes a video of a Santana performance while he was at the school: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/10/25/carlos-santana-visits-mission-high_n_1030868.html. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Jussch!ll!n (talkcontribs) 18:40, 3 May 2016 (UTC)


I found an article A Neighborhood Thing (http://ww2.kqed.org/arts/2015/04/03/a-neighborhood-thing-the-mission-art-scene-in-the-90s-2/) that talks about the movements and how the term is a little problematic. It also has a video attached that talks with some of the artists about the movement and some of the history leading up to it. I think it could help flesh out the characteristics and criticism sections a bit to help expand it. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Hb1994 (talkcontribs) 15:17, 28 April 2016 (UTC)

- I also found a couple of helpful articles that include a lot of images as well which may be helpful, both for looking at specific artists of the movement and for use throughout the page. http://hyperallergic.com/137016/a-san-francisco-school-with-an-artistic-mission/ & http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/25/arts/design/5-artists-in-energy-that-is-all-around-mission-school.html?_r=0 The NY Times one focusses on 5 artists, so if we were doing sections on notable people or something similar that could be useful.Georgiarts (talk) 18:18, 28 April 2016 (UTC)

Yeshibear (talk) 23:18, 29 April 2016 (UTC) I found a essay, through the ProQuest platform, entitled "All on different trips: San Francisco's Mission School and the dot-com years" by Jacqueline Ann von Treskow (Works Cited: J. A. (2012). All on different trips: San francisco's mission school and the dot-com years (Order No. 1514190). Available from ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Full Text: The Humanities and Social Sciences Collection. (1027919807). Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/1027919807?accountid=13802). Her thesis conveys her research on the "tidal wave of redevelopment and gentrification as a result of the city's dot-com boom, Mission School artists and other cultural producers in the neighborhood were initiating and participating in a succession of grassroots, alternative exhibition spaces, publications, act of creative resistance, and community-making endeavors aimed at cultivating a culture based on an ethos of resourcefulness, collectivity, and self-support" (V). http://search.proquest.com.jpllnet.sfsu.edu/docview/1027919807/previewPDF/5646A25267164790PQ/3?accountid=13802 Yeshibear (talk) 23:18, 29 April 2016 (UTC)

I found that there was an exhibition called "Energy that is All Around/Mission School" at New York University's Grey Art Gallery. It was only on display from April 15 to July 12 of 2014, but it was the first museum in the East Coast to display works of art from the Mission School Art Movement. "ENERGY THAT IS ALL AROUND featured paintings, drawings, sculptures, and installations (including a number of the artists’ classic “cluster” pieces) alongside more recent works created especially for this exhibition. Also included is an extensive selection of ephemera, such as sketches, letters, journals, scrapbooks, and cut-outs." Local venues that exhibited the works of Johanson, Kilgallen, McCarthy, McGee, and Neri were the "Four Walls, The Lab, New Langton Arts, the Luggage Store, and Adobe Books." And in 2010, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SF MoMA) praised or gave a nod to the movement with a "wall text" statement claiming: that the Mission school was “the most significant art movement to emerge out of San Francisco in the late twentieth century.”

Additionally in the article, from Juxtapoz Magazine shared with readers the artist's influences for the movement was of "lowbrow visual culture—such as cartoons, signage, and folk art. All were very involved in making and promoting graffiti, and each had one or more tag names. Although each developed a distinct artistic style and philosophy, they shared a penchant for the radical and the political. They all took inspiration from Bay Area Figuration, the Beats, Funk art, and Punk."[1] Jenfong826 (talk) 04:25, 19 May 2016 (UTC)

  1. ^ http://www.juxtapoz.com/news/energy-that-is-all-around-the-mission-school-grey-art-gallery-nyu/