Talk:Stroopwafel

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WikiProject Netherlands (Rated Start-class)
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edit·history·watch·refresh Stock post message.svg To-do list for Stroopwafel:

  • Make an audio recording of the singular form "stroopwafel".
  • Start the lead with the singular form.
  • Add sourced information about the size(s) of stroopwafels.
  • Add information about sales and export.

Comments[edit]

That certainly looks like a delicious stroopwafel to me :) Tim! (talk) 18:20, 18 January 2006 (UTC)

I agree. —Daniel (‽) 13:47, 16 August 2006 (UTC)
We should delete that picture on the grounds of making us all damn hungry ;-; —♦♦ SʘʘTHING(Я) 06:23, 27 August 2006 (UTC)
Noo! —Daniel (‽) 22:21, 27 August 2006 (UTC)
You might want to join m:ASA ;-) notafish }<';> 19:09, 15 November 2006 (UTC)

Page name: syrup waffle vs. stroopwafel[edit]

The word stroopwafel is pure Dutch and there is no indication that it ever will be a loanword in English. User:Effeietsanders wrote: According to google, the word stroopwafel is used more often in english context as "syrup waffle". To use a Google count as an authority on the English language is seriously flawed (how many of these sites are made by Dutchmen for example?). No matter how actively it is promoted by the Dutch name, the word "syrup waffle" is the correct translation and refers to the same product, and should therefore be used, even if it is not used as often. -- P199 18:11, 16 July 2007 (UTC)

Well, Syrup Waffle doesn't really cover the whole, and my dictionary even tells me that it should be treacle wafer. That I mentioned google was just to show that syrup waffle was not that much used as was implied by pointing to WP:UE. The people I heard speaking about Stroopwafels were speaking about Stroopwafels and not syrup waffles. Syrup waffles is just a translation of both parts of the word Stroopwafel seperately, and it doesnt necessarily mean that the combination also gives the same combination in English. (It could for instance very well mean a Flemish Waffle with syrup on it as well) ("treacle wafer" gives btw only 58 hits on google, implying that the word is barely used, although I understand that it is no waterproof evidence, it shows my point) When the cookie is sold as "stroopwafel" on various websites, and yes, mainly set up by dutch maybe, and both names suggested are barely used, why would it be logical that one of those "forced" translations, of which as far as i know "syrup waffle" was only made up to explain (describe) what the word stroopwafel means, would be used? effeietsanders 20:11, 16 July 2007 (UTC)
The name stroopwafel is a descriptive name, so the English translation is not "forced". Also, you are overlooking the fact that WP is global and the product described in the article is sold here as SYRUP WAFFLE!!! Since I live in an English-speaking country, I think I can offer a better perspective on this... -- P199 17:20, 17 July 2007 (UTC)
I've seen them being sold under the name "caramel waffle" as well, which is a less literal and more accurate translation. Starbucks and Stroopwafels (a less serious article)Ruud 18:07, 17 July 2007 (UTC)
Well, if you start yelling to others, sure, have fun with your civilty, and enjoy discussion yourself. effeietsanders 18:10, 18 July 2007 (UTC)
I'm from the UK and I've only ever heard "Stroopwafel". Quendus 19:34, 28 July 2007 (UTC)
I'm a dutchie and live in Australia, Melbourne, they are called Coffee Toppers in some coffee houses, for example Gloria Jeans (still not the same as the ones I used to get in Netherland) [1]

Number links[edit]

I don't think bits such as "1784", "20th century" and especially the number "100" should be linked... At all! Isablue (talk) 12:50, 24 February 2009 (UTC)

Audio file[edit]

In the recording of the word "stroopwafels" the woman is saying "troopwafels" is stead of "stroopwafels" Jus1tin (talk) 23:17, 25 April 2009 (UTC) In the recording of the word "stroopwafels" the woman pronounces 'stroopwafels' correctly! — Preceding unsigned comment added by 86.80.71.160 (talk) 09:16, 21 July 2011 (UTC)

Image requested[edit]

Googling "how to eat stroopwafels" and clicking on "images" gets dozens of nice pictures of stroopwafels perched above hot coffee mugs. Can somebody locate a suitable rights-released picture like these, upload it, and add it to the article? Reify-tech (talk) 14:50, 23 March 2014 (UTC)

@Reify-tech: Just a suggestion, but I think you're fully capable to satisfy your request all by your lonesome without forcing someone else to do your legwork trying to find a rights-released image. Or, novel idea...create such an image yourself? Quite frankly an article with five already-satisfactory illustrative images is not in an urgent need for an additional image just so it satisfies your quirky personal image preference. So, if you'd like to see a sixth image added, nothing is stopping you from making that happen. Indeed, you can be the change you want in the world. --ColonelHenry (talk) 15:13, 23 March 2014 (UTC)
@ColonelHenry: I don't do photos on Wikipedia; I do lots of textual editing and writing. I did do some basic searching on Wikimedia Commons, but didn't find anything suitable. The image requested was just a way of offering suggestions to Wikipedians who may be more knowledgable and interested in finding or making photos. If you're not inclined to contribute in this manner, just ignore the request. Reify-tech (talk) 19:16, 24 March 2014 (UTC)
More problematic is the sourcing. While I know it is SOMETIMES eaten by warming it over a cup, but this is not at all as widespread as some people think. First of all, since this is a Dutch cookie the tradition should be Dutch so you should Google in Dutch. If you look at this Dutch search you only find a few pictures. [2]
Looking at the texts none of these Dutch text claim that warming them over coffee is traditional (but does warm them thus softening the syrup). Perhaps because exported waffles tend to be stale this is necessary, but the fresh ones bought from an artisanal baker and eaten the same day should not be treated like that.
None of the provided English language texts are reliable sources. In fact they seem to be blogs or commercial sites (and one of them is even citing theNibble.com which is presented as a source itself and thus not adding any additional information). If you want to make a claim about the traditional way of eating one of our countries cookies make sure you have good sources. Arnoutf (talk) 15:22, 23 March 2014 (UTC)
You have the advantage of me, since I don't know the Dutch language. It appears that the beverage-warming ritual may be promoted much more in the English language as compared to the country of origin, which gave me a skewed view of the subject. As marketed in the US by Daelmans (a Netherlands-based exporter of stroopwafels), the packaging recommends eating at room temperature, after warming over a hot beverage, or microwave heating. The beverage-warming ritual is even illustrated in a 3-part diagram on the back of the box. This strikes me as similar to the way that Boston baked beans are marketed elsewhere as a favorite dish of Bostonians, while in Boston one has to make a special effort to find this dish.
I do think that this beverage-warming ritual is still notable and deserves mention, though the fact that it is widely-described in English, and not so much in Dutch is also notable and should be mentioned. Reify-tech (talk) 19:16, 24 March 2014 (UTC)
Perhaps you could be bold and look for some sources for it and add it right after you find a camera and take that picture you expect others to take for you.--ColonelHenry (talk) 19:20, 24 March 2014 (UTC)
No problem even if you would say that "outside the Netherlands stroopwafels are sometimes marketed with a warming ritual etc." that would already be fine and a commercial cite (primary source) would be an ok reference for a cautious claim like that. Arnoutf (talk) 19:39, 24 March 2014 (UTC)
PS If you ever have the opportunity to visit the Netherlands - I would recommend to go to a weekly market in a medium size market (almost any will do) and buy a supersize stroopwafel (at about 1 Euro / 1.5 US dollar) see it getting baked and eat immediately still warm as snack in the street and you will realize that warming rituals are not needed for the fresh stuff (see some images for the idea [3]).
Older or most supermarket/store stroopwafels tend to very tough though and warming those is a good idea. Arnoutf (talk) 19:46, 24 March 2014 (UTC)

Stroopwafelsdag[edit]

In The Netherlands, the special Stroopwafel day is on October 15. 15 was supposed to be easy to remember because it's the number of letters in "Stroopwafelsdag". — Preceding unsigned comment added by Bertin v (talkcontribs) 12:49, 17 February 2015 (UTC)

You're welcome to add it to the article, if you can cite a WP:RS for this. Reify-tech (talk) 16:32, 17 February 2015 (UTC)

Looking forward to that reliable source indeed. Arnoutf (talk) 18:33, 17 February 2015 (UTC)

renamed???[edit]

This article was recently renamed from the given named "Stroopwafel" to "Dutch waffle" which is more of a description than a given name. I have three serious problems with the way this was done.

(1) The evidence that Dutch waffle (as name) is synonymous AND more common than stroopwafel is flimsy at best.The argumentation given was that "Dutch waffle" is the more common name (google search does not support that outright by the way [4]) Even worse, the source given to support this claim [5] explicitly names the waffle "Stroopwafel" (see the quote below and note that the Dutch waffle in the company name may refer to a range of different waffles and it does not become clear that it refers to stroopwafels).

Kling has some experience going the opposite direction. His company, "Eat Dutch Waffles," has brought the Dutch delicacy known as "stroopwafel" — a hot waffle cookie filled with syrup — into 1,000 American stores and bakeries.
He guessed around a half of Dutch people know what doughnuts are, but most have only tried low-quality versions on offer in grocery stores.
"A stroopwafel tastes very different when it's fresh, and it's the same for a doughnut," he said. Europeans "won't really have any basis for value comparison: they don't know what makes a good doughnut."

(2) This move was done by @Loginnigol without any attempt to even look for consensus, this together with the flimsy argumentation and evidence makes the move overly hasty.

(3) The move was done very sloppily and lazily @Loginnigol only changed the name of the article which at not other place than the title refer to the pastry as Dutch waffle. This has created internal inconsistencies. No post move cleanup was done. Together this makes the move not a very good idea in my opinion Arnoutf (talk) 07:43, 16 August 2015 (UTC)

PS note that a google.com search using "dutch waffle" gives a lot of references to articles named stroopwafel and only 2 to that use the term "dutch waffle" as such. One is about a completely different pastry [6] and a rather explicit sexual definition that has nothing to do with the pastry [7]. I am now even mystified where @Loginnigol became so certain Dutch waffle is the common name, as it appears that (if anything) the name stroopwafel is much much more common. Unless strong evidence is provided about the common use as Dutch waffle very soon I will request the move to be undone. Arnoutf (talk) 07:56, 16 August 2015 (UTC)
I disagree with this move as well. Stroopwafel is the most common term, I have never heard of "Dutch waffle". Please undo it. CodeCat (talk) 12:19, 16 August 2015 (UTC)
  • Article should not have been moved without any discussion. Agree with undoing the move.--☾Loriendrew☽ (ring-ring) 12:44, 16 August 2015 (UTC)
  • In the UK, I've seen them sold as "stroopwafels", "toffee waffles" or just "waffles". I don't remember seeing "Dutch waffles". "Stroopwafel" seems the clearest and least ambiguous name to me, and it's the name I use myself. -- Dr Greg  talk  13:32, 16 August 2015 (UTC)

Requested move 18 August 2015[edit]

The following is a closed discussion of a requested move. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on the talk page. Editors desiring to contest the closing decision should consider a move review. No further edits should be made to this section.

The result of the move request was: moved. Unanimous agreement. Jenks24 (talk) 06:12, 26 August 2015 (UTC)



Dutch waffleStroopwafel – Request to move back to original title, not possible without admin intervention due to double redirects. Loginnigol moved this page from the name Stroopwafel to the current Dutch waffle on August 16 because that would be the more common name. This was done without any discussion. Furthermore, the source given by Loginnigol in the edit summary gives no evidence of Dutch waffle being the common name, in fact it support the original name (stroopwafel)[8] . In addition, a google search on Dutch waffle also supports the original name (stroopwafel) as more common [9]. I opened a discussion here and posted a message on Loginnigol's talk page to ask to clarify the move here. Loginnigol has not responded but has made several edits since I posted the message. Within a day after the move there have been 4 editors (including myself) that have unanimously voiced on talk:Dutch waffle that it should be moved back to the original stroopwafel. Arnoutf (talk) 18:01, 18 August 2015 (UTC)


The above discussion is preserved as an archive of a requested move. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on this talk page or in a move review. No further edits should be made to this section.

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United Airlines[edit]

As of December 2015, United Airlines started serving stroopwafels on some of their flights - see http://newsroom.united.com/2015-12-09-Free-Snacks-are-Back-United-Airlines-to-Introduce-New-Signature-Snacks . This has likely introduced them to many who would not otherwise have heard of them. Is this a significant enough fact to be worth mentioning in the article, or would that be considered spam? Winged Cat (talk) 03:26, 16 June 2017 (UTC)

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