Talk:TAM Airlines Flight 3054

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Good article TAM Airlines Flight 3054 has been listed as one of the Engineering and technology good articles under the good article criteria. If you can improve it further, please do so. If it no longer meets these criteria, you can reassess it.
September 8, 2007 Good article nominee Listed

September 5 Edits[edit]

In addition to other changes, I should point out I added info on the FDR. I was careful to phrase in a way that says that the FDR "recorded" the TL's position as such, and that the spoilers did not deploy (but not saying that that's what caused the crash). I am looking, however, for a graph that's roaming around depicting the effect of spoilers in the braking run of an A320--showing how most of the braking action during the first few seconds of the landing run is almost exclusively a result of aerodynamic forces, and that only below 80 or so knots that the mechanical breaking (wheels) take over most of the braking.--Dali-Llama 01:25, 6 September 2007 (UTC)

Wrong term used[edit]

I believe the proper term to describe the deviation from the runway course sould be "veering left" and not "bearing left". — Preceding unsigned comment added by 192.100.180.20 (talk) 18:10, 15 May 2012 (UTC)

Good article nomination[edit]

This article reads quite well, but there are two problems:

  • The lead suggests that 6 people on the ground died, but the infobox summary suggests that the number was 12; please clarify.
  • These two references seem strange. What is the capitalised text at the end for? Please fix.
Marcos Chagas and Aloisio Milani (2007-07-17). Listas de nomes divulgada pela TAM ultrapassam previsão oficial de 176 passageiros (Portuguese). Agência Brasil. Retrieved on 2007-07-18. “71.JULIO CESAR REDECKER”
Marcos Chagas and Aloisio Milani (2007-07-17). Listas de nomes divulgada pela TAM ultrapassam previsão oficial de 176 passageiros (Portuguese). Agência Brasil. Retrieved on 2007-07-18. “106.PAULO ROGERIO AMORETTY SOUZA”

I'm putting this article on hold as the article is close to GA status, however the issues noted above must be dealt with before GA status can be awarded. I hope that this can be addressed within the seven days allowed by on hold, and wish you all the best with your editing... -- Johnfos 10:45, 7 September 2007 (UTC)

Hi Johnfos. Once again, thank you for the help. I fixed the first issue and I took a look at those two sources. The caps are the actual quotes from the source (IE: the source itself uses caps). If if you feel it should be changed to lowercase for this article, let me know.--Dali-Llama 12:33, 7 September 2007 (UTC)

Thanks for that... yes, I think lowercase would be better... Johnfos 08:44, 8 September 2007 (UTC)

Done. The Rambling Man 10:23, 8 September 2007 (UTC)

Many thanks... GA awarded... Johnfos 11:16, 8 September 2007 (UTC)

I'm not sure if flight chronology currently deserves its own section. Epbr123 10:29, 9 September 2007 (UTC)

No, it probably doesn't - it could easily be integrated into the Crash section. The Rambling Man 10:49, 9 September 2007 (UTC)
Or we could figure out what could be included to improve it.--Dali-Llama 15:34, 9 September 2007 (UTC)

You tube link removal.[edit]

1 link removed - CCTV footage - No indication from clip information or uploader profile that uploader has rights to footage concerned is conected to the production entity responsible for it. Sfan00 IMG (talk) 17:37, 20 November 2007 (UTC)

crash cause[edit]

I read the Crash section twice - I still don't understand why the plane crashed. 85.227.226.235 (talk) 23:04, 21 January 2008 (UTC)

The crash happened because the plane was not equipped with a braking parachute (drag chute). Nowadays aircraft manufacturers and airlines ignore this important safety feature in the name of weight reduction (i.e. profit allmighty), even though the drag chute is the only braking device to work independent of runway conditions and aircraft system conditions (even with total loss of hydraulics and electricity). Drag chute can also be used to exit a flat spin, it is designed to tear away at 300km/h airspeed but the moment moment helps orient the plane. The highly efficient drag chute of the Tu-104 saved the life of hundreds of people during landings during torrent rain/snowstorm and with poor soviet wheel-brakes. 87.97.110.223 (talk) 20:24, 15 December 2009 (UTC)
That's because the cause of the crash has not been fully investigated. The best we can do is provide a narrative based on the FDR data. But off-the-record, it seems pretty clear from reading the crash section: The plane landed with the computer recording one thrust lever in the "Climb" position, which upon the disconnection of the autothrottle on touchdown, meant that the right engine accelerated while the left engine entered reverse thrust. As one lever was in "Climb" the automatic spoilers did not deploy, and the plane did not slow down (as the wheel brakes are useless at that point). The open question is why the thrust lever was at that "Climb" position (or perhaps why did the computer record the thrust lever as being in that position). A secondary question, somewhat answered, is why the pilot chose to continue the landing as opposed to take off again, which can be attributed to pilots' general reluctance to reject a landing once a thrust reverser is deployed (in case it won't re-stow on throttle-up). Again, this is my explanation to you--the article for the meantime has to stick to a narration of facts.--Dali-Llama (talk) 00:38, 22 January 2008 (UTC)
While I thank you for trying to explain it to me, that doesn't solve the bigger problem: the article is inpenetrable to the average reader, and turning to the talk page should not be needed to understand the article. This is not a page on rocket science - there is no reason to not provide the text in plain english, such as "The current theory is that the crash was caused by one engine going forward, the other backwards" or similar. Please at least consider adding an intro to the cause section explaining "the cause of the crash has not been fully investigated. Here follows some technical gobbledygook in the meanwhile" or similar, as well as possibly having your "technobabble detector" undergo maintenance for the future! :-) 85.227.226.235 (talk) 15:44, 22 January 2008 (UTC)


The basic idea of the crash explanation is "The left engine was left at idle, since it could not reverse thrust. Also, it was set to climb, but idle. The pilots assumed the other engines would reverse thrust, but with one engine set to climb, there reverse thrust did not automatically occur. When the pilots increased thrust from other engines , aiming to increase reverse thrust, they increased speed , and differential thrust occured because the left engine was left at idle. Different thrust is a form of steering. With the plane increasing speed above suitable landing speeds, the wheels ,flaps and rudder steering and braking systems became ineffective. The steering caused by differential thrust steered the airplane off the runway, and a severe crash occurred as it ran into airport related buildings. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 202.92.33.42 (talk) 01:57, 1 August 2011 (UTC)

Anynobody's models for the Gol 1907 and TAM 3054 planes[edit]

Here are Anynobody's models for the planes: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Image:Anypreview.png WhisperToMe (talk) 06:55, 5 February 2008 (UTC)

Hydroplaned?[edit]

Did Flight 3054 hydroplane? The article mentions no runway grooves had been added, and this accident looks just like Lufthansa Flight 2904. Same type plane, also on a wet runway. Anynobody 04:17, 17 February 2008 (UTC)

As always, the final report has not been released so no conclusions can be made with 100% of certainty, but it's reasonable to say that hydroplaning was not the cause for the accident, and if anything, a minor contributing factor. The plane never slowed down to a point where the wheelbrakes would have been effective on either dry or wet runways.--Dali-Llama (talk) 14:28, 17 February 2008 (UTC)

I agree that in and of itself hydroplaning would be a minor factor, however one of the things that went wrong on the Lufthansa flight was a quirk in the A320's conditions for deploying the spoilers. The computer would deploy them if a certain amount of weight was detected by compression of shock absorbers within each main gear strut, which caused one of the struts not to register correctly when the wheels it was attached to were hydroplaning. In that case, had the spoilers deployed I doubt the outcome would've been a crash. I guess my question is more did Airbus remove that prerequisite from preventing deploying the spoilers. We'll have to wait for the report I suppose. Anynobody 05:56, 18 February 2008 (UTC)

Generally the sensor requiring the weight of the aircraft to be on the wheels, aptly called the "Weight on Wheels" sensor, needs to be triggered for automatic spoiler deployment. Because of the risk of automatic spoiler deployment if the throttles are idled while the plane is in the air during descent, it's incredibly unlikely that the "prerequisite" would be removed. I'm not familiar with Airbuses too much, but in most Boeing widebodies, thrust reversers are used until 80 knots, along with braking, and then stowed after 80 kts as they don't do any more good afterwards. I would imagine that in this case the failure to deploy the thrust reversers for whatever reason was a lot more influential than the lack of spoiler deployment. But, I suppose that's completely speculation on my part. -Shortspecialbus (talk) 05:54, 8 March 2008 (UTC)

Official investigation report[edit]

The Official Report into the accident has been released. It is in Portuguese only. Mjroots (talk) 06:40, 1 November 2009 (UTC)

Archives of BEA releases[edit]

WhisperToMe (talk) 01:49, 2 May 2013 (UTC)

External links modified[edit]

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Cheers.—cyberbot IITalk to my owner:Online 07:16, 21 January 2016 (UTC)

I hope, that I am allowed to ask the following question.[edit]

In Mayday S11E01, Deadly Reputation a.k.a. Reputation's disaster, they mentioned, that the old way of reverse-throttling, which is: first working reverse thrust to full rev, then malfunctioning one to ilde, is more efficient tham pulling both thrust leavers to the back. What does cause that? They did not explain that in mayday. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 87.165.105.227 (talk) 19:56, 22 July 2016 (UTC)

I hope, that I am allowed to ask the following question.[edit]

In Mayday S11E01, Deadly Reputation a.k.a. Reputation's disaster, they mentioned, that the old way of reverse-throttling, which is: first working reverse thrust to full rev, then malfunctioning one to ilde, is more efficient tham pulling both thrust leavers to the back. What does cause that? They did not explain that in mayday. --87.165.105.227 (talk) 19:56, 22 July 2016 (UTC)ß (written on OTG+Bluetooth OTG keyboard]].

I hope, that I am allowed to ask the following question.[edit]

In Mayday S11E01, Deadly Reputation a.k.a. Reputation's disaster, they mentioned, that the old way of reverse-throttling, which is: first working reverse thrust to full rev, then malfunctioning one to ilde, is more efficient tham pulling both thrust leavers to the back. What does cause that? They did not explain that in mayday. --87.165.127.176 (talk) 17:25, 9 August 2016 (UTC)ß (written on OTG+Bluetooth OTG keyboard]].

Is this true?[edit]

On the Finnish/Suomi page and when I translate it, it said that there was two French nationals, and one each from Argentina, Portugal, and Peru. Is that true or is it a unreliable source? 73.87.74.115 (talk) 13:15, 11 August 2017 (UTC)

External links modified (January 2018)[edit]

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