Twickenham Park

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Twickenham Park House

Twickenham Park is an estate in Twickenham in South West London.

History[edit]

New Park of Richmond, now called Twickenham Park, passed to Edward Bacon in 1574 and to the English philosopher, Francis Bacon, in 1593.[1] In 1608 the property passed to Lucy Russell, Countess of Bedford.[1] In 1618 she gave it to a relative, Sir William Harrington, Member of Parliament for Hertford. Harrington sold it to Mary Home, Countess of Home in 1621.[1]

The property was acquired from the Countess of Home by Sir Thomas Nott, a Royalist Army officer, in 1640.[2] Nott remained there until 1659 when he sold it to a Mr Henry Murray.[1] In 1668 Murray sold it to John Berkeley, 1st Baron Berkeley of Stratton, another Royalist Army officer, who died in 1678.[3]

In 1685 the Berkeley family sold the property to Robert Brudenell, 2nd Earl of Cardigan.[1] The property was then bought by Sir Thomas Vernon, Member of Parliament for Whitchurch, in 1698[4] and by the Algernon Coote, 6th Earl of Mountrath in 1743.[1]

In 1766 the property passed to the Harriet Pelham-Holles, Duchess of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, who set about mixed farming in the park,[5] and in 1788 it passed to Lord Frederick Cavendish, a British Army officer.[6]

Following Cavendish's death in October 1803 the house passed to Sir William Abdy, 7th Baronet.[7] Abdy sold the house at auction to Francis Gosling who in turn demolished it in 1809.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "Twickenham, The Environs of London: volume 3: County of Middlesex". 1795. p. 558-604. Retrieved 22 June 2014. 
  2. ^ "Sir Thomas Nott". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Retrieved 22 June 2014. 
  3. ^ "John Berkeley, 1st Baron Berkeley of Stratton". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Retrieved 22 June 2014. 
  4. ^ "Sir Thomas Vernon of Twickenham Park". History of Parliament. Retrieved 22 June 2014. 
  5. ^ "Twickenham Park: A Brief History". Twickenham Park. Retrieved 22 June 2014. 
  6. ^ "Lord Frederick Cavendish". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Retrieved 22 June 2014. 
  7. ^ a b "Obituary: Lord Frederick Cavendish". The Leeds Intelligencer. 31 October 1803. Retrieved 22 June 2014. 

Coordinates: 51°27′28″N 0°19′50″W / 51.45769°N 0.33069°W / 51.45769; -0.33069