Union Pacific North Line

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Union Pacific North Line
Highland Park Metra train 070915.jpg
A southbound train departs Highland Park station
Overview
StatusOperational
OwnerUnion Pacific Railroad
LocaleChicago metropolitan area
Termini
Stations27 (1 under construction)
Service
TypeCommuter rail
SystemMetra
Operator(s)Union Pacific Railroad
Metra
Daily ridership41,000 (Avg. Weekday 2009)[1]
Ridership2,300,363 (2020)
Technical
Line length51.6 miles (83.0 km)[2]
Track gauge4 ft 8+12 in (1,435 mm)
Route map

text
text
Amtrak
Lake Front Depot
demolished
84.2
Milwaukee
(1966-1971)
83.0
Amtrak
82.5
78.2
Cudahy
closed
74.7
61.8
Racine
closed
51.6
Kenosha BSicon PCC.svg
KD Line
to Rockford
44.5
Winthrop Harbor
43.1
Camp Logan
closed
42.1
Zion
39.9
Dunes Park
closed
37.6
Asbestos
closed
35.9
Waukegan
34.0
33.7
North Chicago
CN Railway logo.svg
32.2
Great Lakes
30.2
Lake Bluff
28.3
Lake Forest
25.7
Fort Sheridan
24.5
Highwood
23.0
Highland Park
21.5
Ravinia
20.9
Ravinia Park
20.5
Braeside
19.2
Glencoe
17.7
Hubbard Woods
16.6
Winnetka
15.8
Indian Hill
15.2
Kenilworth
14.4
Wilmette
13.3
Evanston Central Street
12.7
Weber Subdivision
to Mayfair
Chicago Transit Authority Logo.svg
12.0
Evanston Davis Street Chicago Transit Authority Logo.svg
11.5
11.0
Evanston Main Street Chicago Transit Authority Logo.svg
10.3
Calvary
closed
Chicago Transit Authority Logo.svg
Chicago Transit Authority Logo.svg
Yellow
9.4
Rogers Park
8.4
Kenmore
closed
Peterson Ridge
under construction
7.8
Rose Hill
closed
7.1
Summerdale
closed
6.5
Ravenswood Chicago Transit Authority Logo.svg
Chicago Transit Authority Logo.svg
6.2
5.5
Northcenter
closed
Chicago Transit Authority Logo.svg
4.6
3.5
Deering
closed
Chicago River (north branch)
UP-NW
to Harvard
or McHenry
2.8
Clybourn
UP-W to Elburn
Wells Street Station
(1855–1911)
MD-N NCS MD-W Amtrak
Chicago Transit Authority Logo.svg
Green Pink
0.0
Ogilvie Chicago Transit Authority Logo.svg

The Union Pacific North Line (UP-N) is a Metra line in the Chicago metropolitan area. It runs between Ogilvie Transportation Center and Kenosha, Wisconsin; however, most trains terminate in Waukegan, Illinois. Although Metra owns the rolling stock, the trains are operated and dispatched by the Union Pacific Railroad. This line was previously operated by the Chicago & North Western Railway before its merger with the Union Pacific Railroad, and was called the Chicago and North Western Milwaukee Division and then the Chicago & North Western/North Line before the C&NW was absorbed by Union Pacific in April 1995. It is the only Metra line that travels outside Illinois.

Metra does not refer to its lines by particular colors, but the timetable accents for the Union Pacific North line are dark "Flambeau Green," a nod to the C&NW's Flambeau 400 passenger train.[3])

On certain weekday trains, a private club car (#553, Deerpath,) runs exclusively on the Union Pacific North Line. It is now the only private commuter car in service in the United States.

The current timetable as of December 5, 2022 shows 35 trains in each direction on weekdays. Of these, six inbound trains originate from Kenosha, 17 from Waukegan, six from Highland Park, and six from Winnetka. Seven outbound trains terminate at Winnetka, five at Highland Park, 17 at Waukegan, and six at Kenosha.

13 trains operate in each direction on Saturdays. Of these, five inbound trains originate from Kenosha and eight from Waukegan. Six outbound trains terminate at Waukegan and seven at Kenosha.

Nine trains operate in each direction on Sundays. Of these, three inbound trains originate from Kenosha and six from Waukegan. Six outbound trains terminate at Waukegan and three at Kenosha.

During the summer concert season, on weekends, an extra outbound train RAV1 makes all stops to Evanston Central Street, then runs express to Ravinia Park during events, with a train returning to Chicago after the concert.

History[edit]

The route followed by the UP North Line was constructed in 1854 by the Chicago & Milwaukee Railroad.[4] Passenger service between Chicago and Waukegan began on January 4, 1855. Initially, a single train operated each day, departing from a terminal in Chicago at Water St. and Kinzie St. at 8:30 am and returning from Waukegan at 3:30 pm.[5][6] The president of the railroad, former Chicago mayor Walter S. Gurnee, speculated on land in Lake County spurring the development of railway suburbs along the line.[7] The railroad merged with the Green Bay, Milwaukee & Chicago Railroad in 1863, and was acquired by the Chicago and North Western Railway in 1866.[6][8] Commuter rail services along the line started operating into the new Chicago and North Western Terminal (now Ogilvie Transportation Center) in 1911. In 1966, the Chicago and North Western closed the Lake Front Depot and began operating into the new Milwaukee Union Station. This service would ultimately prove to be relatively short lived as the Chicago and North Western ended operations between Chicago and Milwaukee in 1971 and the line was truncated to Kenosha.

The North line became part of Metra when the agency was formed in 1984. The trains continued to be operated by the Chicago and North Western Railway under contract until that railroad was bought by Union Pacific in 1995. UP now operates passenger services along the line for Metra. Under a longstanding agreement that UP inherited from the C&NW, Metra owns the vehicles and the stations along the line, but Union Pacific employs the crew who actually operate the trains, and they also control the right-of-way along the route.

All stations on the line except for Ravinia Park are open daily. Ravinia Park is only open during the Ravinia Festival in the summer months.

Ridership[edit]

Between 2014 and 2019, annual ridership declined by 8.3% from 9,328,441 passengers to 8,552,117 passengers.[9][10] Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, ridership dropped to 2,300,363 passengers in 2020.[11]

1,000,000
2,000,000
3,000,000
4,000,000
5,000,000
6,000,000
7,000,000
8,000,000
9,000,000
10,000,000
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
2021

Route[edit]

The service shares the Union Pacific Railroad's Harvard Subdivision with the Union Pacific Northwest Line from Ogilvie Transportation Center in downtown Chicago to a junction just before Clybourn station. From Clybourn, the North Line splits from the Northwest Line and traverses the Kenosha Subdivision north to Kenosha, Wisconsin. The Kenosha Subdivision continues to St. Francis, Wisconsin and a junction with the Union Pacific's Milwaukee Subdivision.[12] No passenger trains operate north of Kenosha.

The Green Bay Trail parallels the Union Pacific North Line, using the former right of way of the North Shore Line for over 51.9 miles (83.5 km) from the Chicago Loop to Kenosha, Wisconsin.

Stations[edit]

State County Zone Location Station Connections and notes
WI Milwaukee
  Milwaukee Milwaukee Closed April 30, 1971
National Avenue Closed between 1943 and 1956
Cudahy Cudahy Depot Closed between 1956 and 1961
South Milwaukee South Milwaukee Closed between 1956 and 1961
Racine
Racine Racine Depot Closed April 30, 1971
Kenosha J Kenosha Kenosha Bus interchange Kenosha Area Transit: 1, 4
Kenosha Streetcar Kenosha Streetcar
IL Lake I Winthrop Harbor Winthrop Harbor
Zion Camp Logan Closed after October 28, 1956, served Camp Logan
Zion Bus interchange Pace: 571 Zion
  Beach Park Dunes Park Closed after October 28, 1956
Waukegan Asbestos Closed after October 28, 1956
H Waukegan Bus interchange Pace: 561 Castlecrest via McAree, 562 Gurnee via Sunset, 563 GLNS, 564 Jackson/14th, 565 Grand, 568 Belvidere, 571 Zion, 572 Washington
G North Chicago Abbott's Platform Closed 1986[13]
North Chicago Bus interchange Pace: 563 GLNS, 564 Jackson/14th
Great Lakes Bus interchange Pace: 563 GLNS
Lake Bluff Lake Bluff
F Lake Forest Lake Forest
Highwood Fort Sheridan Bus interchange Pace: 472 Highland Park–Highwood
E Highwood Bus interchange Pace: 472 Highland Park–Highwood
Highland Park Highland Park Bus interchange Pace: 213 Green Bay Road, 471 Highland Park–Northbrook Court, 472 Highland Park–Highwood
Ravinia
Ravinia Park Seasonal
Braeside
Cook D Glencoe Glencoe Bus interchange Pace: 213 Green Bay Road
Winnetka Hubbard Woods Bus interchange Pace: 213 Green Bay Road
Winnetka Bus interchange Pace: 213 Green Bay Road, 423 Linden CTA–The Glen–Harlem CTA
Indian Hill Bus interchange Pace: 213 Green Bay Road
Kenilworth Kenilworth Bus interchange Pace: 213 Green Bay Road
C Wilmette Wilmette Bus interchange Pace: 213 Green Bay Road, 421 Wilmette Avenue, 422 Linden CTA–Glenview–Northbrook Court
Evanston Evanston Central Street Bus interchange CTA Bus: 201 Central/Ridge, 206 Evanston Circulator
Bus interchange Pace: 213 Green Bay Road
Evanston Davis Street Chicago Transit Authority Logo.svg Chicago "L": Purple (at Davis)
Bus interchange CTA Bus: 93 California/Dodge, 201 Central/Ridge, 206 Evanston Circulator
Bus interchange Pace: 208 Golf Road, 213 Green Bay Road, 250 Dempster Street
Dempster Street Closed December 1, 1958
Evanston Main Street Chicago Transit Authority Logo.svg Chicago "L": Purple (at Main)
Bus interchange CTA Bus: 206 Evanston Circulator
Bus interchange Pace: 213 Green Bay Road
Calvary Closed December 1, 1958
B Chicago Rogers Park Bus interchange CTA Bus: 22 Clark, 96 Lunt
Kenmore Closed December 1, 1958[14]
Peterson Ridge Under construction
Rose Hill Closed December 1, 1958[14]
Summerdale Closed December 1, 1958[14]
Ravenswood Chicago Transit Authority Logo.svg Chicago "L": Brown (at Damen)
Bus interchange CTA Bus: 81 Lawrence
  Ravenswood–Wilson Closed December 1, 1958
Northcenter Closed December 1, 1958
Belmont Avenue Closed December 1, 1958
Deering Closed after June 13, 1943
A Clybourn Metra Metra:  Union Pacific Northwest
Bus interchange CTA Bus: 9 Ashland, X9 Ashland Express, 73 Armitage
Ogilvie
Transportation Center
Metra Metra:  Union Pacific Northwest,  Union Pacific West
Chicago Transit Authority Logo.svg Chicago "L": Green Pink (at Clinton)
Bus interchange CTA Bus: J14, 19, 56, 60, 120, 124, 125, 126, 128, 130, 157, 192


References[edit]

  1. ^ "Ridership Reports – System Facts". Metra. Archived from the original on January 2, 2010. Retrieved April 6, 2010.
  2. ^ Metra Railfan Tips – Union Pacific/North Line Archived September 12, 2005, at the Wayback Machine
  3. ^ "Did you know?" (PDF). On the Bi-Level: 3. June 2009. Archived from the original (PDF) on January 2, 2010.
  4. ^ "Gurnee History". Village of Gurnee. Retrieved September 16, 2007.
  5. ^ Mason, Blanche (1919). "Historical Sketch of Highland Park". Highland Park Public Library. Retrieved December 3, 2007.
  6. ^ a b Giles, H. H. (1879). "Wisconsin Railroads". The History of Racine and Kenosha Counties, Wisconsin. Chicago: Western Historical Company. pp. 173–185.
  7. ^ Ebner, Michael H. "Lake County, IL". Encyclopedia of Chicago. Retrieved September 21, 2007.
  8. ^ "Chicago & North Western – A Capsule History". Chicago & North Western Historical Society. Retrieved September 16, 2007.
  9. ^ "RIDERSHIP TRENDS ANNUAL REPORT 2018" (PDF). Metra. p. 4. Retrieved May 12, 2019.
  10. ^ "RIDERSHIP TRENDS ANNUAL REPORT 2019" (PDF). Metra. Retrieved February 27, 2021.
  11. ^ "RIDERSHIP TRENDS ANNUAL REPORT 2020" (PDF). Retrieved April 4, 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  12. ^ "Illinois State Rail Plan" (PDF). Illinois Department of Transportation. 2012. pp. 4–28.
  13. ^ Ridership Trends - Annual Report 2017 (PDF) (Report). Metra Division of Strategic Capital Planning. February 2018. p. 32. Retrieved December 2, 2018.
  14. ^ a b c "Chicago & North Western Railroad: History of Milwaukee line". Edgewater Historical Society. Retrieved August 10, 2018.

External links[edit]

Route map:

KML is from Wikidata