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Today's featured article

This star symbolizes the featured content on Wikipedia.

At the top of the Main Page, a summarized lead section from one of Wikipedia's featured articles is displayed as "Today's featured article" (TFA). The current month's queue can be found here. TFAs are scheduled by the TFA coordinators, Crisco 1492 (Chris), Dank (Dan), Jimfbleak, and Mike Christie. Community discussion of suggestions takes place at the TFA requests page.

If you notice an error in a future TFA summary, you're welcome to fix it yourself, but if the mistake is in today's or tomorrow's summary, you can leave a message at WP:ERRORS to ask an administrator to fix it. The summaries are formatted as a single paragraph of around 1,150 characters (including spaces), with no reference tags or alternative names. Only the link to the specified featured article is bolded, and this must be the first link. The summary should be preceded by an appropriate image when available; fair use images are not allowed.

The editnotice template for Today's Featured Article is {{TFA-editnotice}}. It is automatically applied by {{Editnotices/Namespace/Main}} when the article's title matches the contents of {{TFA title}}. To contact the TFA coordinators, please leave a message on the TFA talk page, or type "{{@TFA}}" in a signed comment on any talk page.

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Today's featured article

The Oran fatwa was an Islamic legal opinion issued in 1504 to address the forced conversion to Christianity of Muslims in the Crown of Castile in Iberia in 1500–1502. The fatwa sets out detailed relaxations of the sharia (Islamic law) requirements, allowing the Muslims to conform outwardly to Christianity and perform acts that are ordinarily forbidden in Islamic law, when necessary to survive. It includes relaxed instructions to fulfill the ritual prayers, charity and purification, and recommendations for how to handle obligations that violated Islamic law, such as worshipping as Christians, performing blasphemy, and consuming pork and wine. The fatwa enjoyed wide currency in Spain among Muslims and Moriscos – Muslims nominally converted to Christianity and their descendants – from the time of the first forced conversions up to the expulsion of the Moriscos (1609–1614). The author of the fatwa was Ahmad ibn Abi Jum'ah, a North African Islamic law scholar (mufti) of the Maliki school. (Full article...)

Tomorrow's featured article

Fortepiano by J. A. Stein, Augsburg

The Piano Concerto No. 24 in C minor, K. 491, is a concerto by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart for keyboard (period fortepiano pictured) and orchestra. He composed it in the winter of 1785–86 and completed it on 24 March 1786. He played the solo part in the premiere in early April that year at the Burgtheater in Vienna. The work is one of only two minor-key piano concertos by Mozart, the other being No. 20 in D Minor. It features the largest array of instruments of any Mozart concerto: strings, woodwinds including oboes and clarinets, horns, trumpets and timpani. The concerto consists of three movements. The first, Allegro, is in sonata form and is longer than the opening movement of every concerto that Mozart had previously written. The second movement, Larghetto, features a strikingly simple principal theme, and the final Allegretto presents a theme followed by eight variations. The work is one of Mozart's most advanced compositions in the concerto genre. Early admirers included Ludwig van Beethoven and Johannes Brahms. The musicologist Arthur Hutchings considered it to be Mozart's greatest piano concerto. (Full article...)