Wikipedia:Today's featured article/requests

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Here the community can nominate articles to be selected as "Today's featured article" (TFA) on the main page. The TFA section aims to highlight the range of articles that have "featured article" status, from Art and architecture through to Warfare, and wherever possible it tries to avoid similar topics appearing too close together without good reason. Requests are not the only factor in scheduling the TFA (see Choosing Today's Featured Article); the final decision rests with the TFA coordinators (Crisco 1492 and Dank, who also select TFAs for dates where no suggestions are put forward). Please confine requests to this page, and remember that community endorsement on this page does not necessarily mean the article will appear on the requested date.

The rules for nominations are relatively simple:

  • The article must be a featured article.
  • The article must not have appeared as TFA before (see the list of possibilities here)
  • The request must be either for a specific date within the next 30 days that have not yet been scheduled (10 spaces), or a non-specific date (4 spaces). If a section is full, you can wait for a vacancy, or ask the coordinators for advice. The template {{@TFA}} can be used in a message to "ping" the coordinators through the notification system.

If you have an exceptional request that deviates from these instructions (for example, an article making a second appearance as TFA, or a "double-header"), please discuss the matter with the TFA coordinators in the first instance.

It can be helpful to add the article to the pending requests template up to 1 year before the requested date. This does not guarantee selection, but does help others see what nominations may be forthcoming. Requestors should still nominate the article here during the 30-day timeframe.

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Featured content:

Today's featured article (TFA):

Featured article tools:


How to post a new nomination:

I.
Create the nomination subpage.

In the box below, enter the full name of the article you are nominating (without using any brackets around the article's name) and click the button to create your nomination page.


II.
Write the nomination.

On that nomination page, fill out as many of the relevant parts of the pre-loaded {{TFAR nom}} template as you can, then save the page.

Your nomination should mention:

  • when the last similar article was, since this helps towards diversity on the main page (browsing Wikipedia:Today's featured article/recent TFAs will help you find out);
  • when the article was promoted to FA status (since older articles may need extra checks);
  • and (for date-specific nominations) the article's relevance for the requested date.

You're welcome to create your own TFA text as a summary of the lead section, or you can ask for assistance at WT:TFAR. We use one paragraph only, with no reference tags or alternative names; the only thing bolded is the first link to the article title. The length when previewed (including spaces) is usually between 1025 and 1175 characters. Add a suitable free-use image if available; fair use images are not allowed.

III.
Post at TFAR.

After you have created the nomination page, add it here under a level-3 heading for the preferred date (or under a free non-specific date header). To do this, add (replacing "ARTICLE TITLE" with the name of your nominated article):
===February 29===
{{Wikipedia:Today's featured article/requests/ARTICLE TITLE}}

Nominations are ordered by requested date below the summary chart. More than one article can be nominated for the same date.

It would also then be helpful to add the nomination to the summary chart, following the examples there. Please include the name of the article that you are nominating in your edit summary.

If you are not one of the article's primary editors, please then notify the primary editors of the TFA nomination; if primary editors are no longer active, please add a message to the article talk page.

Scheduling:

In the absence of exceptional circumstances, TFAs are scheduled in date order, not according to how long nominations have been open or how many supportive comments they have. So, for example, January 31 will not be scheduled until January 30 has been scheduled (by TFAR nomination or otherwise).


Summary chart[edit]

Currently accepting requests from December 26 to January 25.

Date Article Notes Supports Opposes
Nonspecific 1
Nonspecific 2 History of Norwich City F.C. 2 1
Nonspecific 3 Witchfinder General (film) 1 0
Nonspecific 4
January 5 Bradley Cooper birthday 1 0
January 10 Kalki Koechlin birthday 1 0
January 16 Night of January 16th play is titled after date 1 0
January 19 Hope Obama's last day in office 1 0

Tally may not be up to date. The nominator is included in the number of supporters.

Nonspecific date nominations[edit]

Nonspecific date 1[edit]

Nonspecific date 2[edit]

History of Norwich City F.C.[edit]

Celebration of victory in 2004

The history of Norwich City F.C. stretches back to 1902. After a brief period in amateur football, the club spent 15 years as a semi-professional team in the Southern League before admission to The Football League in 1920. For most of the next 50 years, Norwich City F.C. sat in Division Three (South), then the joint lowest tier of the football league, a period that was distinguished by "a thrilling giant-killing sequence which took them to the FA Cup semi-finals" in 1959. Shortly afterwards, the club won its first major trophy, the 1962 League Cup. Norwich finally reached the pinnacle of the league structure in 1972, with their first promotion to the top tier. Since then, Norwich City has acquired a reputation as a "yo-yo club", with 22 seasons in the top league and 15 in the second tier. During this period the club has achieved most of its greatest distinctions, claiming the League Cup in 1985, reaching two more FA Cup semi finals, 1989 and 1992, finishing fifth, fourth and third in the top division and beating Bayern Munich in the UEFA Cup. In the course of its history, Norwich City has survived a number of incidents that threatened its survival, including financial crises. (Full article...)

  • Most recent similar article(s): 16 October
  • Main editors: Dweller
  • Promoted: 2008
  • Reasons for nomination:
  • Support as nominator. Gerda Arendt (talk) 22:31, 5 November 2016 (UTC)
  • Support ...it's football season in UK...Cas Liber (talk · contribs) 00:32, 8 November 2016 (UTC)
  • Oppose. Has neither of you read the article before supporting? This was promoted back when the FA standards were very different, and hasn't been maintained for some years (the fact that it ends with discussion of the forthcoming 2015 season should surely be a clue), and is packed with unsourced statements and obvious omissions. (Which country is this team from, for instance? It's not reasonable to expect readers to have a clue where Norwich is. Who is their current manager, and when was he appointed? Why are there no notable players mentioned after 2006?) ‑ Iridescent 20:14, 10 November 2016 (UTC)
Oops, ok. fixing time....Cas Liber (talk · contribs) 19:43, 11 November 2016 (UTC)

I can take a look when I get a minute. We'll need to avoid/remove recentism, as that's often the most serious issue in these "History of" type articles. --Dweller (talk) Become old fashioned! 16:47, 14 November 2016 (UTC)

Unusually, I'd say the problem in this particular case is the opposite; aside from a bit of gloating about results over Ipswich, it has virtually no additions since you stopped working on it, so just kind of fizzles out somewhere around Gunn's sacking. (No mention of Ed Balls, for instance, who aside from the sainted Delia is probably the only person associated with NCFC 99.9% of readers have ever heard of.) ‑ Iridescent 17:49, 14 November 2016 (UTC)
I can fix that, but it is suffering from recentism. The last 16 years dominates the article. I'll get stuck in. --Dweller (talk) Become old fashioned! 14:17, 15 November 2016 (UTC)

Nonspecific date 3[edit]

Witchfinder General (film)[edit]

Previous nomination

This nomination predates the introduction in April 2014 of article-specific subpages for nominations and has been created from the edit history of Wikipedia:Today's featured article/requests.

This is the archived discussion of the TFAR nomination for the article below. Subsequent comments should be made on the appropriate discussion page (such as Wikipedia talk:Today's featured article/requests). Please do not modify this page unless you are renominating the article at TFAR. For renominations, please add {{collapse top|Previous nomination}} to the top of the discussion and {{collapse bottom}} at the bottom, then complete a new nomination underneath. To do this, see the instructions at {{TFAR nom/doc}}.

The result was: not scheduled by BencherliteTalk 16:23, 17 October 2013‎ (UTC)

Vincent Price

Witchfinder General is a 1968 British horror film directed by Michael Reeves and starring Vincent Price (pictured), Ian Ogilvy, and Hilary Dwyer. The screenplay was by Reeves and Tom Baker based on Ronald Bassett's novel of the same name. A low-budget film of under £100,000, the story details the heavily fictionalised murderous witch-hunting exploits of Matthew Hopkins, a 17th-century English lawyer who claimed to have been appointed as a "Witch Finder Generall" by Parliament during the English Civil War to root out sorcery and witchcraft. The film was retitled The Conqueror Worm in the United States in an attempt to link it with an earlier series of Edgar Allan Poe-related films starring Price. Reeves featured many scenes of intense torture and violence that were considered unusually sadistic at the time. Upon its theatrical release in 1968, the movie's gruesome content was met with disgust by several film critics in the UK. In the US, the film was shown virtually intact and was a box office success, but it was almost completely ignored by reviewers. The movie eventually developed into a cult film and it was named the 15th greatest horror film of all time. (Full article...)

I'm nominating this on behalf of Hal Raglan, with his consent, as an option for Halloween. This article was promoted to FA in 2006 and looks to be in good shape for an older FA. Unless my calcuations are off, this should receive at least 3 points: 1 for date connection (horror film on Halloween) and 2 points for age (promoted two or more years ago). Imzadi 1979  01:10, 3 October 2013 (UTC)

  • Comment POTD on 31 October will also be about a film (poster from the 1932 film The Mummy); this has been scheduled since June. I don't mind having both run at the same time, but the TFA delegate should be aware. — Crisco 1492 (talk) 07:01, 3 October 2013 (UTC)
  • Comment Checklinks found three dead links so I tagged two and fixed one. One of them is File:Cry of the Banshee.jpg, which was deleted at the beginning of the year, so the original source for this could be used instead. Edgepedia (talk) 19:17, 12 October 2013 (UTC)
  • Comment. Given it's a British film, the word "movie" should be removed from the blurb (and also the article). Espresso Addict (talk) 14:20, 13 October 2013 (UTC)

As this one hasn't so far got much in the way of comments on its date suitability, does anyone have any alternative suggestions for a 31st October TFA? We have a few bat articles, though we're lacking in ones with decent images; Malkin Tower has just passed FAC (but I doubt Eric Corbett will thank me for mentioning it here in this context); or we could run a non-Hallowe'en article for a change, either Sea or something else. Thoughts? BencherliteTalk 19:04, 14 October 2013 (UTC)

Malkin Tower was a joint effort with BigDom and Trappedinburnley, so I wouldn't stand in the way of it being featured on Halloween. I think it might be a reasonable choice in fact. Eric Corbett 19:19, 14 October 2013 (UTC)
(e/c) I'll ping them: @Trappedinburnley: and @BigDom:... Your thoughts? It would make a change from horror films (which we've had the last couple of years) and contrast with the POTD too. BencherliteTalk 19:24, 14 October 2013 (UTC)
Sounds good to me. BigDom (talk) 22:29, 14 October 2013 (UTC)
Me too. Anything I can do to improve its chances? --Trappedinburnley (talk) 17:39, 16 October 2013 (UTC)
<!
Vincent Price

Witchfinder General is a 1968 British horror film directed by Michael Reeves and starring Vincent Price (pictured), Ian Ogilvy, and Hilary Dwyer. The screenplay was by Reeves and Tom Baker based on Ronald Bassett's novel of the same name. A low-budget film of under £100,000, the story details the heavily fictionalised murderous witch-hunting exploits of Matthew Hopkins, a 17th-century English lawyer who claimed to have been appointed as a "Witch Finder Generall" by Parliament during the English Civil War to root out sorcery and witchcraft. The film was retitled The Conqueror Worm in the United States in an attempt to link it with an earlier series of Edgar Allan Poe-related films starring Price. Reeves featured many scenes of intense torture and violence that were considered unusually sadistic at the time. Upon its theatrical release in 1968, the movie's gruesome content was met with disgust by several film critics in the UK. In the US, the film was shown virtually intact and was a box office success, but it was almost completely ignored by reviewers. The movie eventually developed into a cult film and it was named the 15th greatest horror film of all time. (Full article...)

  • Most recent similar article(s): Star Trek: First Contact November 22, 2016
  • Main editors: Hal Raglan
  • Promoted: October 1, 2006
  • Reasons for nomination: Non specific date request. I'm nominating this as it looks in good shape and is (by nature of its age) a different topic from one commonly seen recently. Cas Liber (talk · contribs) 11:29, 22 November 2016 (UTC)
  • Wait - A 2006 promotion and while it is quite well written, I'm seeing sources such as Video Watchblog, DVD Maniacs and DVD Drive-In. Suggest a run through FAR before main page. Ceoil (talk) 15:03, 27 November 2016 (UTC)


Nonspecific date 4[edit]

Specific date nominations[edit]

January 5[edit]

Bradley Cooper[edit]

Bradley Cooper in 2009

Bradley Cooper (born January 5, 1975) is an American actor and producer. He is one of the highest-paid actors in the world, and has been nominated for several accolades, including four Academy Awards, two British Academy Film Awards and two Golden Globe Awards. Cooper enrolled in the MFA program at the Actors Studio, New York City, in 2000. His career began with a guest role in the television series Sex and the City in 1999. He first gained recognition as Will Tippin in the spy-action television show Alias. His breakthrough role came in 2009 with The Hangover, a successful comedy which spawned two sequels. In 2011, Cooper was named International Man of the Year by GQ and Sexiest Man Alive by People. He portrayed a struggling writer in Limitless, a rookie police officer in The Place Beyond the Pines, and played in the romantic comedy-drama Silver Linings Playbook, the black comedy crime film American Hustle, and the biopic American Sniper. In 2014, he portrayed Joseph Merrick in a Broadway revival of The Elephant Man, garnering a nomination for the Tony Award for Best Actor in a Play. Time magazine named him one of the 100 most influential people in the world in 2015. (Full article...)

January 10[edit]

Kalki Koechlin[edit]

Kalki Koechlin in 2016

Kalki Koechlin (born 10 January 1984) is an Indian actress and screenwriter of French descent, who predominantly works in Bollywood. Drawn to theatre at a young age, Koechlin studied at the University of London, and worked simultaneously with a local theatre company. After returning to India, she made her screen debut in the romantic drama Dev.D in 2009, earning the Filmfare Award for Best Supporting Actress. She co-wrote the screenplay for the crime thriller That Girl in Yellow Boots (2011), in which she also played the lead role. She performed in independent films, including the thriller Shaitan (2011) and the coming-of-age drama Margarita with a Straw (2014). She has appeared in documentary films including Freedom Matters (2016), aiming at spreading awareness on human trafficking, and Living Shakespeare (2016), a BBC production where she drew parallels between Ophelia and Indian women. Koechlin has written, produced, and acted in several stage plays in India. She made her directorial debut on stage with the tragicomedy Living Room (2015). She is also an activist and promotes various causes ranging from health and education to women's empowerment and gender equality. (Full article...)

  • Support: It would be best to see it as TFA on 10 January 2017, her birthday. Kailash29792 (talk) 11:17, 22 November 2016 (UTC)

January 16[edit]

Night of January 16th[edit]

Flyer for the Broadway production of Night of January 16th

Night of January 16th is a play by Russian-American author Ayn Rand, inspired by the death of the "Match King", Ivar Kreuger. Set in a courtroom during a murder trial, an unusual feature of the play is that members of the audience are chosen to play the jury. The court hears the case of Karen Andre, a former secretary and lover of businessman Bjorn Faulkner, of whose murder she is accused. The jury must rely on character testimony to decide whether Andre is guilty. The play's ending depends on the verdict. Rand wanted to dramatize a conflict between individualism and conformity, with the jury's verdict revealing which viewpoint they preferred. The play was first produced in 1934 in Los Angeles under the title Woman on Trial. Producer Al Woods took it to Broadway for the 1935–36 season and re-titled it Night of January 16th. It became a hit, running for seven months. The story has been adapted as a movie, as well as for television and radio. Rand had many disputes with Woods over script changes, so in 1968 she re-edited the script for publication as the "definitive" version. (Full article...)

  • Most recent similar article(s): Last non-musical play I could find as TFA was The Author's Farce in 2011. Most recent for a stage production of any kind (a light opera) was May 30.
  • Main editors: RL0919
  • Promoted: November 20, 2016
  • Reasons for nomination: Date of January 16 in the title. This would be my first TFA.
  • Support as nominator. RL0919 (talk) 23:02, 6 December 2016 (UTC)

January 19[edit]

Hope (painting)[edit]

Hope (second version)

Hope is an 1886 Symbolist oil painting by the English artist George Frederic Watts. Radically different from previous treatments of the subject, it shows a lone blindfolded female figure sitting on a globe, playing a lyre which has only a single string remaining. Watts intentionally used symbolism not traditionally associated with hope to make the painting's meaning ambiguous. As reproductions began to circulate in large quantities worldwide, it became a widely popular image. Theodore Roosevelt displayed a copy at his Sagamore Hill home in New York, and a 1922 film was based on the painting. By this time Hope was coming to seem outdated and sentimental, and Watts was rapidly falling out of fashion, but despite the decline in Watts's popularity Hope remained influential. Martin Luther King Jr. based an influential 1959 sermon on the theme of the painting, as did Jeremiah Wright in 1990. Among the congregation for the latter was the young Barack Obama, who took "The Audacity of Hope" as the theme of his 2004 Democratic National Convention keynote address, and as the title of his 2006 book; he based his successful 2008 presidential campaign around the theme of "Hope". (Full article...)

  • Most recent similar article(s): Vincent van Gogh (December 16) as last visual arts TFA, Migration of the Serbs (December 2) as last painting TFA. While all three are late 19th-century topics, there's virtually no similarity other than the medium of paint, as one would be hard-pressed to come up with three less similar artists.
  • Main editors: Iridescent
  • Promoted: October 22, 2016
  • Reasons for nomination: To mark Obama's last day in office, without running an explicitly political article over what's going to be an unusually sensitive inauguration and transition. This painting, rather than the abstract philosophical concept, is explicitly what Obama was referring to in both the 2004 Audacity of Hope speech that originally made him famous, and his book of the same name. The blurb intentionally gives stronger than might be expected weight to American politics, as its connection to US politics is what makes this day relevant.
  • Support as nominator.  ‑ Iridescent 21:07, 6 December 2016 (UTC)