Woodstown, New Jersey

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Woodstown, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Woodstown
Woodstown highlighted in Salem County. Inset map: Salem County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Woodstown highlighted in Salem County. Inset map: Salem County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Woodstown, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Woodstown, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°39′01″N 75°19′34″W / 39.650178°N 75.326233°W / 39.650178; -75.326233Coordinates: 39°39′01″N 75°19′34″W / 39.650178°N 75.326233°W / 39.650178; -75.326233[1][2]
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Salem
Incorporated July 26, 1882
Government[5]
 • Type Borough
 • Body Borough Council
 • Mayor Donald Dietrich (term ends December 31, 2015)[3]
 • Clerk Cynthia Dalessio[4]
Area[1]
 • Total 1.625 sq mi (4.209 km2)
 • Land 1.585 sq mi (4.104 km2)
 • Water 0.040 sq mi (0.105 km2)  2.49%
Area rank 438th of 566 in state
13th of 15 in county[1]
Elevation[6] 49 ft (15 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 3,505
 • Estimate (2014)[10] 3,454
 • Rank 431st of 566 in state
7th of 15 in county[11]
 • Density 2,211.8/sq mi (854.0/km2)
 • Density rank 273rd of 566 in state
2nd of 15 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08098[12][13]
Area code(s) 856 exchange: 769[14]
FIPS code 3403382720[1][15][16]
GNIS feature ID 0885452[1][17]
Website www.historicwoodstown.org

Woodstown is a borough in Salem County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 3,505,[7][8][9] reflecting an increase of 369 (+11.8%) from the 3,136 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 18 (-0.6%) from the 3,154 counted in the 1990 Census.[18]

Woodstown was established on July 26, 1882, from portions of Pilesgrove Township based on the results of a referendum held that same day. The borough's incorporation was confirmed on March 3, 1925.[19]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 1.625 square miles (4.209 km2), including 1.585 square miles (4.104 km2) of land and 0.040 square miles (0.105 km2) of water (2.49%).[1][2]

The Borough of Woodstown is an independent municipality completely surrounded by Pilesgrove Township.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 490
1890 1,516 209.4%
1900 1,371 −9.6%
1910 1,613 17.7%
1920 1,589 −1.5%
1930 1,832 15.3%
1940 2,027 10.6%
1950 2,345 15.7%
1960 2,942 25.5%
1970 3,137 6.6%
1980 3,250 3.6%
1990 3,154 −3.0%
2000 3,136 −0.6%
2010 3,505 11.8%
Est. 2014 3,454 [20] −1.5%
Population sources:
1890-2000[21] 1890-1920[22]
1890-1910[23] 1910-1930[24]
1900-1990[25] 2000[26][27] 2010[7][8][9]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 3,505 people, 1,444 households, and 938.6 families residing in the borough. The population density was 2,211.8 per square mile (854.0/km2). There were 1,529 housing units at an average density of 964.9 per square mile (372.5/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 82.25% (2,883) White, 11.44% (401) Black or African American, 0.51% (18) Native American, 1.17% (41) Asian, 0.03% (1) Pacific Islander, 1.28% (45) from other races, and 3.31% (116) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 5.56% (195) of the population.[7]

There were 1,444 households, of which 31.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.7% were married couples living together, 15.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.0% were non-families. 29.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 12.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.41 and the average family size was 2.99.[7]

In the borough, 25.2% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.2% from 18 to 24, 25.4% from 25 to 44, 27.8% from 45 to 64, and 14.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39.0 years. For every 100 females there were 90.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.5 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $62,958 (with a margin of error of +/- $8,239) and the median family income was $74,479 (+/- $7,727). Males had a median income of $64,688 (+/- $16,960) versus $40,781 (+/- $8,241) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $31,074 (+/- $3,576). About 3.4% of families and 8.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.0% of those under age 18 and 8.5% of those age 65 or over.[28]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 3,136 people, 1,304 households, and 839 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,975.6 people per square mile (761.5/km2). There were 1,389 housing units at an average density of 875.0 per square mile (337.3/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 85.04% White, 12.91% African American, 0.19% Native American, 0.73% Asian, 0.26% from other races, and 0.86% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.56% of the population.[26][27]

There were 1,304 households out of which 30.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.5% were married couples living together, 11.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.6% were non-families. 30.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.38 and the average family size was 3.00.[26][27]

In the borough the population was spread out with 24.7% under the age of 18, 6.9% from 18 to 24, 29.6% from 25 to 44, 22.3% from 45 to 64, and 16.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 87.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 83.8 males.[26][27]

The median income for a household in the borough was $44,533, and the median income for a family was $56,328. Males had a median income of $42,175 versus $31,169 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $24,182. About 3.5% of families and 5.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.0% of those under age 18 and 4.3% of those age 65 or over.[26][27]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Woodstown is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[5] The Borough form of government used by Woodstown, the most common system used in the state, is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor can veto ordinances subject to an override by a two-thirds majority vote of the council. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.[29][30]

As of 2015, the Mayor of the Borough of Woodstown is Republican Don Dietrich, whose term of office ends December 31, 2015. Members of the Woodstown Borough Council (with party affiliation, term-end year and committee assignments listed in parentheses) are Council President David Layton (R, 2016; Utilities, Streets and Roads), John F. Hall (D, 2017; General Government / Finance), Joe Hiles (D, 2016; Finance and General Government), Glenn Merkle (R, 2015; Health, Recreation and Open Space / Public Safety), Ed Segrest (R, 2017; Public Safety, Health, Recreation and Open Space) and Debra Tierno (R, 2015; Streets / Roads and Utilities).[31][32][33][34][35][36][37][38][39][40]

In March 2015, the Borough Council selected Debbie Tierno from among three candidates nominated by the Republican municipal committee to fill the vacant seat of Fran Grenier who had resigned the previous month.[41]

Matt Perry was selected by the Borough Council in December 2013 from among three candidates offered by the Republican municipal committee to fill the vacant seat of Veronica Soultz who resigned from office the previous month after moving out of the borough.[42][43]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

US Route 40 goes through Woodstown.

Woodstown is located in the 2nd Congressional District[44] and is part of New Jersey's 3rd state legislative district.[8][45][46]

New Jersey's Second Congressional District is represented by Frank LoBiondo (R, Ventnor City).[47] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark, term ends 2021)[48] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus, 2019).[49][50]

For the 2014–2015 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 3rd Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Stephen M. Sweeney (D, West Deptford Township) and in the General Assembly by John J. Burzichelli (D, Paulsboro) and Adam Taliaferro (D, Woolwich Township).[51] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[52] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[53]

Salem County is governed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders who are elected at-large to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either two or three seats coming up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects a Director and a Deputy Director from among its members. As of 2014, Salem County's Freeholders (with party, residence, term-end year and committee chairmanship listed in parentheses) are Director Julie A. Acton (R, Pennsville Township, 2016; Administration), Deputy Director Dale A. Cross (R, Pennsville Township, 2014; Public Safety), Bruce L. Bobbitt (D, Pilesgrove Township, 2014; Public Services), Ben Laury (R, Elmer, 2015; Public Works) Beth E. Timberman (D, Woodstown, 2015; Social Services), Robert J. Vanderslice (R, Pennsville Township, 2014; Health and Human Services) Lee R. Ware (D, Elsinboro Township, 2016; Transportation, Agriculture and Cultural Affairs).[54][55] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Gilda T. Gill (2014),[56] Sheriff Charles M. Miller (2015)[57] and Surrogate Nicki A. Burke (2015).[58][59]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 2,340 registered voters in Woodstown, of which 664 (28.4% vs. 30.6% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 573 (24.5% vs. 21.0%) were registered as Republicans and 1,099 (47.0% vs. 48.4%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 4 voters registered to other parties.[60] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 66.8% (vs. 64.6% in Salem County) were registered to vote, including 89.2% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 84.4% countywide).[60][61]

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 51.7% of the vote (886 cast), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 46.2% (792 votes), and other candidates with 2.1% (36 votes), among the 1,728 ballots cast by the borough's 2,497 registered voters (14 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 69.2%.[62][63] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 936 votes (52.3% vs. 50.4% countywide), ahead of Republican John McCain with 821 votes (45.8% vs. 46.6%) and other candidates with 19 votes (1.1% vs. 1.6%), among the 1,791 ballots cast by the borough's 2,340 registered voters, for a turnout of 76.5% (vs. 71.8% in Salem County).[64] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 818 votes (50.8% vs. 52.5% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 766 votes (47.5% vs. 45.9%) and other candidates with 11 votes (0.7% vs. 1.0%), among the 1,611 ballots cast by the borough's 2,241 registered voters, for a turnout of 71.9% (vs. 71.0% in the whole county).[65]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 62.9% of the vote (704 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 34.6% (387 votes), and other candidates with 2.5% (28 votes), among the 1,132 ballots cast by the borough's 2,472 registered voters (13 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 45.8%.[66][67] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 522 votes (45.4% vs. 46.1% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 489 votes (42.5% vs. 39.9%), Independent Chris Daggett with 108 votes (9.4% vs. 9.7%) and other candidates with 19 votes (1.7% vs. 2.0%), among the 1,150 ballots cast by the borough's 2,361 registered voters, yielding a 48.7% turnout (vs. 47.3% in the county).[68]

Education[edit]

The Woodstown Friends Meeting House (Quaker church) was completed in 1785.

The Woodstown-Pilesgrove Regional School District serves public school students in pre-Kindergarten through twelfth grade from Woodstown and Pilesgrove Township in four schools. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's three schools had an enrollment of 1,656 students and 135.5 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 12.22:1.[69] Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[70]) are Early Childhood Learning Center[71] / Mary S. Shoemaker Elementary School[72] for grades PreK-4 (502 students), Woodstown Middle School[73] for grades 5-8 (451) and Woodstown High School[74] for grades 9-12 (753).[75][76] Students from neighboring Alloway Township, Oldmans Township and Upper Pittsgrove Township attend the high school as part of sending/receiving relationships.[77]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 18.28 miles (29.42 km) of roadways, of which 11.51 miles (18.52 km) were maintained by the municipality, 4.66 miles (7.50 km) by Salem County, and 2.11 miles (3.40 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[78]

U.S. Route 40 traverses the borough roughly east to west[79] and Route 45 roughly south to north.[80]

Public transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit provides bus service between Salem and Philadelphia on the 401 route, with local service offered on the 468 route operating between Penns Grove and Woodstown.[81][82]

The 18.6 miles (29.9 km) southern portion of the freight rail Salem Branch operated under contract by Southern Railroad of New Jersey runs through the borough.[citation needed]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Woodstown include:

References[edit]

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  3. ^ 2014 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs, as of December 15, 2014. Accessed January 12, 2015.
  4. ^ Departments, Borough of Woodstown. Accessed June 28, 2012.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 19.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Woodstown, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Woodstown borough, Salem County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 17, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 3. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Table DP-1. Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Woodstown borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed May 17, 2012.
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  13. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed September 1, 2013.
  14. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Woodstown, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed September 1, 2013.
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  19. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 218. Accessed May 17, 2012.
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  21. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Salem County Municipalities, 1810 - 2000, WestJersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed February 9, 2013.
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  25. ^ Table 6. New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed June 28, 2015.
  26. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Woodstown borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 2, 2012.
  27. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Woodstown borough, Salem County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 2, 2012.
  28. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Woodstown borough, Salem County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 17, 2012.
  29. ^ Cerra, Michael F. "Forms of Government: Everything You've Always Wanted to Know, But Were Afraid to Ask", New Jersey State League of Municipalities. Accessed November 30, 2014.
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  31. ^ Mayor and Council, Woodstown Borough. Accessed June 20, 2015.
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  39. ^ Wehner, Brittany. "Layton retains council president seat at Woodstown reorganization", South Jersey Times, January 3, 2013. Accessed April 24, 2015. "Republican incumbent Fran Grenier and newcomer Glenn D. Merkle defeated Democrat incumbent John Hall and Valerie Spence-Lacy in the election in November. The six-member council is comprised of five Republicans and one Democrat. The mayor, Don Dietrich is a Republican.... Other members of the council include Republicans Ed Segrest, Veronica Soultz, and Democrat Joe Hiles."
  40. ^ Staff. "Salem County election results 2014", South Jersey Times, November 4, 2014. Accessed March 14, 2015.
  41. ^ Wehner, Brittany M. "Woodstown officials appoint new councilwoman to fill vacant seat", NJ.com, March 11, 2015. Accessed June 20, 2015. "Woodstown Borough Council unanimously approved a new council member Tuesday night to fill the recently vacated seat.Republican Debbie Tierno was appointed councilwoman to take over a vacant seat after Councilman Fran Grenier resigned last month."
  42. ^ Staff. "Councilman Matt Perry sworn in to fill the remainder of former councilwoman's term", Jersey Tribune, December 2, 2013. Accessed September 21, 2014. "Following the resignation of councilwoman Veronica Soultz, borough officials swore in the new councilman at the recent meeting. Matt Perry was sworn in last Tuesday to finish Soultz’s term."
  43. ^ Wehner, Brittany M. "Woodstown Councilwoman resigns, officials approve replacement", South Jersey Times, November 19, 2013. Accessed September 21, 2014. "Republican Veronica Soultz, formerly of Woodstown, stepped down at the last council meeting for personal reasons, she said.... Three potential Republican replacement candidates were named including John Hathaway, Matt Perry, and former councilman and mayor Rick Pfeffer. Borough council unanimously approved Matt Perry to fill the vacancy, with the exception of Soultz, who abstained from the vote."
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  72. ^ Mary S. Shoemaker Elementary School, Woodstown-Pilesgrove Regional School District. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  73. ^ Woodstown Middle School, Woodstown-Pilesgrove Regional School District. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  74. ^ Woodstown High School, Woodstown-Pilesgrove Regional School District. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  75. ^ About the District, Woodstown-Pilesgrove Regional School District. Accessed October 31, 2013. "Located in Salem County, the Woodstown-Pilesgrove Regional School District consists of four schools: Early Childhood Learning Center (grades Pre-Kindergarten and Kindergarten), Mary S. Shoemaker Elementary School (grades 1 through 5), Woodstown Middle School (grades 6 through 8), and Woodstown High School (grades 9 through 12). All four schools serve the residents of the Borough of Woodstown and Township of Pilesgrove. In addition, the high school receives students from Alloway and Upper Pittsgrove Townships as well as a portion of Oldmans Township."
  76. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Woodstown-Pilesgrove Regional School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  77. ^ Woodstown-Pilesgrove Regional School District 2014 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed August 18, 2015. "This School Report Card provides the school district’s constituents with information concerning the district’s programs, including test scores, attendance data of students and staff, financial details, and other specifics which together form a comprehensive review of our school district’s offerings to the Woodstown-Pilesgrove community as well as the high school sending districts of Alloway, Oldmans, and Upper Pittsgrove.
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  79. ^ U.S. Route 40 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2009. Accessed October 31, 2013.
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  82. ^ South Jersey Transit Guide, Cross County Connection, as of April 1, 2010. Accessed September 21, 2014.
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  88. ^ Hilly Flitcraft, Baseball Almanac. Accessed October 31, 2013. "Hilly Flitcraft was born on Tuesday, August 21, 1923, in Woodstown, New Jersey. Flitcraft was 19 years old when he broke into the big leagues on August 31, 1942, with the Philadelphia Phillies."
  89. ^ Petersen, William John. The Story of Iowa: The Progress of an American State, Volume 4, p. 886. Lewis Historical Publishing Company, 1952. Accessed October 31, 2013. "Elwood Lindsay Haines was graduated from the high school at Woodstown, New Jersey, in 1912, after which he entered the University of Pennsylvania, where he obtained the degree of Bachelor of Arts, graduating in the class of 1916."
  90. ^ "MAJOR GENERAL IRVING L. HALTER JR.", United States Air Force. Accessed June 8, 2015. "General Halter is a native of southern New Jersey, graduating from Woodstown High School in 1973."
  91. ^ Sullivan, Kita S. "Mania of mixed martial arts hits N.J. with 2 area fighters", The Philadelphia Inquirer, July 14, 2007. Accessed February 9, 2013. "LaRosa, a 135-pounder from Woodstown, N.J., is the top-ranked MMA fighter. The 29-year-old is a former wrestling, judoka and field hockey athlete with a 13-1-0 record in mixed martial arts."
  92. ^ Everett Shinn, Smithsonian American Art Museum. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  93. ^ "One of Eight", Time (magazine), March 11, 1935. Accessed May 14, 2008. "Others of 'The Eight' may have been better artists but none, including the late, lusty George Luks, had a more adventurous life than Everett Shinn. A fat little Quaker boy in Woodstown, N. J., he was known as 'Pud' (pudding) to his contemporaries."

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