Yamhill County, Oregon

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Yamhill County, Oregon
Yamhill County Courthouse - McMinnville, Oregon.JPG
Yamhill County Courthouse in McMinnville
Map of Oregon highlighting Yamhill County
Location in the U.S. state of Oregon
Map of the United States highlighting Oregon
Oregon's location in the U.S.
Founded July 5, 1843
Seat McMinnville
Largest city McMinnville
Area
 • Total 718 sq mi (1,860 km2)
 • Land 716 sq mi (1,854 km2)
 • Water 2.5 sq mi (6 km2), 0.3%
Population (est.)
 • (2015) 102,659
 • Density 139/sq mi (54/km²)
Congressional district 1st
Time zone Pacific: UTC-8/-7
Website www.co.yamhill.or.us

Yamhill County is a county in the U.S. state of Oregon. As of the 2010 census, the population was 99,193.[1] The county seat is McMinnville.[2] The name's origin is probably an explorer's name for a local Native American tribe, the Yamhill, who are part of the North Kalapuyan family.[3]

Yamhill County is part of the Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, OR-WA Metropolitan Statistical Area. It is in the Willamette Valley.

History[edit]

The earliest known inhabitants of the area were the Yamhill (Yamhelas Indian Tribe, part of the Kalapooian family[4]) Indians, who have inhabited the area for over 8000 years. They are one of the tribes incorporated into the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde. In 1857 they were forced to migrate to the Grand Ronde Indian Reservation created in Oregon's Coastal Range two years earlier.

The earliest non-native settlers were employees of the various fur companies operating in Oregon Country, who started settling there around 1814. But it was the establishment of the Oregon Trail that led to significant migration to the area.

Yamhill District (later county) was created on July 5, 1843, five years before the Oregon Territory was established. It was one of the original four districts created by Oregon's first Provisional Legislature, along with Twality (later Washington), Clackamas, and Champooick (later Marion) counties. The district was originally over 12,000 square miles (31,000 km2), an area that was broken up into twelve present-day counties.

Lafayette, the principal trading center of the western Willamette Valley in early Oregon history, was made the county seat in 1847. The county government was later (1889) moved to McMinnville where it remains today.

The Mount Hebo Air Force Station was a Cold War air defense installation from 1956 to 1980. Located next to Tillamook County, at the top of 3,154-foot (961 m) high Mount Hebo, Air Force radars operated by the 689th Radar Squadron and the 14th Missile Warning Squadron were essential parts of the nation's integrated air defenses. The large radomes protecting the radars from adverse weather effects could be seen silhouetted against the sky from many parts of Yamhill County.

Lock and dam on the Yamhill River[edit]

In 1900 a Yamhill River lock and dam lock and dam was completed about 1.5 miles (2.4 km) downriver from Lafayette, Oregon. The lock was decommissioned in 1954. The dam was deliberately destroyed in 1963 to allow better passage for salmon on the river. The site of the lock and dam is now a county park.

Geography[edit]

Soléna and Grand Cru Estates winery

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 718 square miles (1,860 km2), of which 716 square miles (1,850 km2) is land and 2.5 square miles (6.5 km2) (0.3%) is water.[5] It is the fifth-smallest county in Oregon by area.

The tallest mountain in the county is Trask Mountain in the northwest corner of the county.[6]

Adjacent counties[edit]

National protected areas[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1860 3,245
1870 5,012 54.5%
1880 7,945 58.5%
1890 10,692 34.6%
1900 13,420 25.5%
1910 18,285 36.3%
1920 20,529 12.3%
1930 22,036 7.3%
1940 26,336 19.5%
1950 33,484 27.1%
1960 32,478 −3.0%
1970 40,213 23.8%
1980 55,332 37.6%
1990 65,551 18.5%
2000 84,992 29.7%
2010 99,193 16.7%
Est. 2015 102,659 [7] 3.5%
U.S. Decennial Census[8]
1790-1960[9] 1900-1990[10]
1990-2000[11] 2010-2015[1]

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[12] of 2000, there were 84,992 people, 28,732 households, and 21,376 families residing in the county. The population density was 119 people per square mile (46/km²). There were 30,270 housing units at an average density of 42 per square mile (16/km²). The racial makeup of the county is 88.98% White, 1.47% Native American, 1.07% Asian, 0.85% Black or African American, 0.12% Pacific Islander, 5.08% from other races, and 2.42% from two or more races. 10.61% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 19.6% were of German, 11.4% English, 9.5% American and 8.4% Irish ancestry.

There were 28,732 households out of which 37.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.00% were married couples living together, 9.90% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.60% were non-families. 19.70% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.40% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.78 and the average family size was 3.17.

In the county, the population was spread out with 26.90% under the age of 18, 11.40% from 18 to 24, 28.50% from 25 to 44, 21.40% from 45 to 64, and 11.70% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 102.20 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 101.30 males.

The median income for a household in the county is $44,111, and the median income for a family was $50,336. Males had a median income of $35,686 versus $25,254 for females. The per capita income for the county was $18,951. About 6.00% of families and 9.20% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.10% of those under age 18 and 7.50% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census[edit]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 99,193 people, 34,726 households, and 25,020 families residing in the county.[13] The population density was 138.6 inhabitants per square mile (53.5/km2). There were 37,110 housing units at an average density of 51.8 per square mile (20.0/km2).[14] The racial makeup of the county was 85.4% white, 1.5% Asian, 1.5% American Indian, 0.9% black or African American, 0.2% Pacific islander, 7.2% from other races, and 3.3% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 14.7% of the population.[13] In terms of ancestry, 23.6% were German, 13.7% were English, 12.2% were Irish, and 5.0% were American.[15]

Of the 34,726 households, 35.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.0% were married couples living together, 11.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 28.0% were non-families, and 21.7% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.70 and the average family size was 3.12. The median age was 36.8 years.[13]

The median income for a household in the county was $52,485 and the median income for a family was $61,524. Males had a median income of $44,946 versus $33,717 for females. The per capita income for the county was $24,017. About 9.0% of families and 12.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.8% of those under age 18 and 7.7% of those age 65 or over.[16]

Politics[edit]

Yamhill County vote
by party in presidential elections [17][18]
Year REP DEM Others
2016 47.69% 23,250 39.59% 19,301 12.72% 6,202
2012 51.38% 22,045 44.89% 19,260 3.73% 1,602
2008 49.14% 21,390 47.78% 20,797 3.08% 1,339
2004 56.57% 23,839 41.70% 17,572 1.73% 731
2000 56.36% 19,193 41.86% 14,254 1.78% 606
1996 44.64% 13,900 42.00% 13,078 13.35% 4,157
1992 37.23% 11,693 35.50% 11,148 27.27% 8,565
1988 52.47% 13,321 44.99% 11,423 2.54% 644
1984 62.31% 15,797 37.28% 9,450 0.41% 104
1980 51.15% 12,054 36.89% 8,694 11.97% 2,820
1976 50.38% 9,885 45.27% 8,881 4.35% 854
1972 58.51% 9,660 36.39% 6,008 5.09% 841
1968 55.55% 7,936 38.41% 5,487 6.03% 862
1964 38.08% 5,508 61.88% 8,949 0.04% 6
1960 59.98% 8,295 39.97% 5,528 0.04% 6
1956 61.89% 8,555 38.00% 5,253 0.10% 14
1952 67.27% 9,332 32.24% 4,472 0.49% 68
1948 55.33% 6,379 41.59% 4,794 3.08% 355
1944 51.39% 5,672 45.91% 5,067 2.70% 298
1940 49.48% 5,545 49.67% 5,566 0.86% 96
1936 35.88% 3,443 55.92% 5,366 8.20% 787
1932 41.11% 3,584 55.03% 4,798 3.87% 337
1928 67.97% 5,248 30.85% 2,382 1.18% 91
1924 53.11% 3,803 28.14% 2,015 18.74% 1,342
1920 59.49% 4,102 34.13% 2,353 6.38% 440

Although located west of the Cascades, Yamhill has remained a solidly Republican county in Presidential elections at the same time as other Western Oregon counties have become solidly to powerfully Democratic. No Democratic Presidential candidate has won Yamhill County since Lyndon Johnson’s 1964 landslide, and the only other Democrats to carry the county since Oregon’s statehood have been Franklin Roosevelt in 1940, 1936 and 1932, along with Woodrow Wilson in 1912 when the Republican vote was divided.[19] In recent years, however, both Barack Obama and Bill Clinton have come within three percentage points of claiming the county.

In the United States House of Representatives, Yamhill County lies in Oregon's 1st congressional district, which covers more liberal Washington County and is represented by Democrat Suzanne Bonamici. In the Oregon State Senate, most of Yamhill County is in the 12th Senate District represented by Republican Brian Boquist, whilst the western “panhandle” is in the 5th Senate District represented by Democrat Arnie Roblan. Within the Oregon House of Representatives, Yamhill County lies chiefly within the 24th District represented by Republican Ron Noble, although the western “panhandle” of the county lies within the 10th District represented by Democrat David Gomberg.

Economy[edit]

Grain elevator in Carlton, Yamhill County

The major industries of the county are agriculture, forest products, manufacturing, and education. Yamhill County's economy is supported largely by its many unionized facilities such as Cascade Steel in McMinnville and White Birch Paper in Newberg. It boasts a thriving wine industry and is the home of Evergreen Aviation.

Yamhill County ranks seventh out of Oregon's thirty-six counties in annual market value of its agricultural production.[citation needed] This agricultural production includes wheat, barley, horticulture, and dairy farming, with 13,201 acres or 53.42 square kilometres in 1997 planted in orchards. One-third of the county is covered with commercial timber, and the economic mainstay of the western part of the county is logging and timber products.

Yamhill County is a significant focus of Oregon's wine industry, having the largest area of any Oregon county planted in vineyards. Six of the state's American Viticultural Areas are wholly or partly in the county: Chehalem Mountains AVA, Dundee Hills AVA, Eola-Amity Hills AVA, McMinnville AVA, Ribbon Ridge AVA, and Yamhill-Carlton District AVA. Over 80 wineries and 200 vineyards represent the largest concentration of wine growers and producers in any county in the state. Vineyards often specialize in Pinot noir, but other varieties grown include Pinot gris, Pinot blanc, Chardonnay, Riesling, and Gewürztraminer.

Education[edit]

For tertiary education Yamhill County is served with Linfield College and Chemeketa Community College in McMinnville and George Fox University and Portland Community College in Newberg. For private secondary education the county is served by The Delphian School in Sheridan.

Communities[edit]

Cities[edit]

Census-designated places[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 15, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ McArthur, Lewis A.; McArthur, Lewis L. (2003) [1928]. Oregon Geographic Names (7th ed.). Portland, Oregon: Oregon Historical Society Press. p. 1063. ISBN 978-0875952772. 
  4. ^ http://www.co.yamhill.or.us/content/brief-history-yamhill-county
  5. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved February 28, 2015. 
  6. ^ Peakbagger.com: Trask Mountain, Oregon
  7. ^ "County Totals Dataset: Population, Population Change and Estimated Components of Population Change: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015". Retrieved July 2, 2016. 
  8. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved February 28, 2015. 
  9. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved February 28, 2015. 
  10. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved February 28, 2015. 
  11. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved February 28, 2015. 
  12. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  13. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-02-23. 
  14. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-02-23. 
  15. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-02-23. 
  16. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-02-23. 
  17. ^ "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". Retrieved November 15, 2016. 
  18. ^ Scammon, Richard M. (compiler); America at the Polls: A Handbook of Presidential Election Statistics 1920-1964; pp. 370-374 ISBN 0405077114
  19. ^ Menendez, Albert J.; The Geography of Presidential Elections in the United States, 1868-2004, pp. 284-286 ISBN 0786422173

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 45°14′N 123°19′W / 45.23°N 123.31°W / 45.23; -123.31