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Tell All Your Friends

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Tell All Your Friends
Tellallyourfriends.jpg
Studio album by Taking Back Sunday
Released March 25, 2002
Recorded December 2001
Studio Big Blue Meenie Recording Studio, New Jersey
Genre
Length 33:46
Label Victory
Producer Sal Villanueva
Taking Back Sunday chronology
Tell All Your Friends
(2002)
Where You Want to Be
(2004)
Singles from Tell All Your Friends
  1. "Great Romances of the 20th Century"
    Released: March 12, 2002
  2. "You're So Last Summer"
    Released: September 16, 2003

Tell All Your Friends is the debut studio album by the American rock band Taking Back Sunday. The group had several lineup changes before settling on vocalist Adam Lazzara, guitarist and vocalist John Nolan, guitarist Eddie Reyes, bassist Shaun Cooper, and drummer Mark O'Connell. Taking Back Sunday released a five-song demo in early 2001, after which, they toured for most of the year. They rented a room in Lindenhurst, New York, where they wrote and demoed songs. In December 2001, the band signed with Victory Records and began recording Tell All Your Friends. The album, produced by Sal Villanueva, was recorded at Big Blue Meenie Recording Studio in New Jersey.

In early March 2002, a music video was released for "Great Romances of the 20th Century" and the song was distributed to radio stations. Tell All Your Friends was released on March 25. It sold 2,000 copies its first week, charting at number 183 on the Billboard 200 chart. That summer, Taking Back Sunday toured with Brand New and Rufio. In December, a Fight Club-inspired music video was released for "Cute Without the 'E' (Cut from the Team)". The group spent the early part of 2003 touring with The Used and The Blood Brothers before headlining their own tour. After the tour, Nolan and Cooper left the band and were replaced by Fred Mascherino and Matt Rubano. In September, "You're So Last Summer" was distributed to radio stations and the band began co-headlining a tour with Saves the Day which lasted until November. In November 2003, a music video was released for "You're So Last Summer".

Tell All Your Friends has received mostly positive reviews from critics. In September 2005, the album was certified gold in the U.S. for having sold 500,000 copies. With sales of 790,000 copies, Tell All Your Friends is Taking Back Sunday's best-selling album. It is Victory Records' longest-running release on the Billboard Heatseekers and Independent album charts, charting for 68 weeks on the former and 78 on the latter. In 2012, the band went on tour to celebrate the 10th anniversary of Tell All Your Friends. The band played an acoustic set on the anniversary tour, which was later released in 2013 as the live album TAYF10 Acoustic.

Background[edit]

Guitarist Eddie Reyes, who had played in The Movielife, Mind Over Matter and Inside, and guitarist Jesse Lacey of the Rookie Lot[1] founded Taking Back Sunday in Amityville, New York in November 1999.[2] Lacey moved to bass with the addition of guitarist John Nolan. The group also included vocalist Antonio Longo of One True Thing[1] and drummer Steven DeJoseph.[3] At a party, Nolan reportedly romanced Lacey's girlfriend, after which Lacey left the band.[4][nb 1] Lacey formed Brand New a year later.[6] Nolan contacted Adam Lazzara to fill in on bass,[1] which resulted in Lazzara moving from North Carolina to New York. Lazzara had met the band when they played a show near his hometown in North Carolina.[2][nb 2]

DeJoseph left, leaving the band without a drummer. Mark O'Connell, a friend of Reyes, heard about the vacancy and joined the group.[8] After recording Taking Back Sunday's self-titled EP, Longo left the band and eventually played with Guilt Like Gravity and the Mirror.[6] In December 2000, Lazzara switched from bass to lead vocals.[9] He never thought he would become the group's singer: "I remember getting into [Reyes'] Windstar with that [EP] and just driving around singing those songs, just to make myself actually do it."[10] O'Connell suggested that the group needed a bassist, and brought in Shaun Cooper[10] of Breaking Pangaea.[6] In February 2001, Taking Back Sunday released a five-track demo[9] before touring for a year.[11]

Composition[edit]

Lazzara and Nolan shared an apartment, often staying up talking until 5:00 am, and began showing each other compositions on which they were working. Neil Rubenstein, who later became the group's tour manager, would often find them composing songs with acoustic guitars.[nb 3] Taking Back Sunday had a room in Lindenhurst, New York, where they practiced and composed every night;[10] their first song written was "Great Romances of the 20th Century".[13] The band frequently recorded demos.[14] The band wrote music together, while Lazzara and Nolan wrote lyrics.[12] One member would typically come up with a part, which the rest of the group would expand into a song.[15] Many songs feature Lazzara and Nolan use call-and-response vocals.[16] By December 2001, the group signed to Chicago-based Victory Records[9] and had enough material for an album.[14]

Reyes said that the album was written solely for "fun and the love of music, no expectations."[17] Their lyrics were inspired by personal experience.[18] Nolan and Lazzara had a concept where some of the lyrics could be read "like a play where one line is the boy and the next line is the girl ... Sometimes when you read the lyrics it's a little boring and it's more interesting this way".[13] About half their song titles, according to Nolan, came from "sitting around late at night watching TV".[13] The title of "Cute Without the 'E' (Cut from the Team)" came when a friend of the band said that someone he knew was "cut from the team".[14] "Great Romances of the 20th Century" includes an audio sample from the film, Beautiful Girls (1996).[13] Lazzara said "The Blue Channel" and "Head Club" were songs that the band used "to get enough songs to fill a record so we could go on tour".[19] The album's sound would later be described as emo[20] and post-punk.[21] Around this time, Taking Back Sunday was influenced by emo bands the Get Up Kids and the Promise Ring.[14]

Production[edit]

Although other labels expressed interest in Taking Back Sunday, Victory encouraged them to record an album.[13] Tell All Your Friends was recorded over a period of two weeks[22] in December 2001 at Big Blue Meenie Recording Studio in New Jersey with producer Sal Villanueva.[12] The sessions ended up costing $10,000.[22] The band arrived without a drum set, presuming that the studio would have one. Engineer Tim Gilles said, "No major studio in America has their own [drum] set. You've gotta be fucking kidding me".[13] The group wanted to re-record "Your Own Disaster" from their demo, but was unable to due to time and money constraints.[13] Instead, it was re-recorded for Taking Back Sunday's next album, Where You Want to Be (2004). Villanueva contributed guitar work[12] and co-mixed the recordings with Rumblefish. The album was engineered by Gilles, Erin Farley, and Arun Venkatesh, with mastering by Gilles at Surgical Sound.[23]

Rubenstein contributed vocals to "There's No 'I' in Team", "Timberwolves at New Jersey" and "Head Club". Nolan's sister, Michelle, sang on "Bike Scene" and "Ghost Man on Third", and Matt McDannell contributed vocals to "Head Club".[12] Nolan suggested his sister "because I knew she had an amazing voice".[13] In a 2011 Alternative Press article, Cooper said that the band was unhappy with "some of the choices that had been made without us"; the introductions to "Great Romances of the 20th Century" and "The Blue Channel" were changed by studio technicians without the band's input.[24]

Release[edit]

In January 2002, Taking Back Sunday toured with Rival Schools.[25] A music video for "Great Romances of the 20th Century" directed by Christian Winters, a friend of the band, was released on March 4.[26] Winters made the video before the group signed with Victory, and the record company enjoyed it.[13] The song was distributed to radio stations on March 12,[26] and Tell All Your Friends was released on March 25.[26][27][nb 4] Its cover art was taken by John Clark.[12] To promote the album, Victory founder Tony Brummel targeted people who were familiar with the label and also fans of emo. In Chicago, New York and Los Angeles, Victory gave out 20,000 sampler albums at a cost of about $100,000; Brummel considered this a better investment than attempting to gain radio play. RED Distribution, who handled distribution for Victory, was aware that the group did not have radio play and began posting about the album on emo websites. A Yahoo! Group with over 1,300 Taking Back Sunday fans allowed them to download demos of "Bike Scene" and "Head Club", a tactic which was hoped would increase sales.[28]

For three weeks beginning in mid-March 2002, Taking Back Sunday participated in the Victory Records tour.[26] The band then toured that summer with Brand New and Rufio.[29] In September and October, they toured with Midtown and Recover.[30] During the tour, Lazzara sustained an injury which forced the band to leave for two weeks.[31] In November and December 2002, Taking Back Sunday toured with the Starting Line and Northstar.[32] On December 10, a music video was released for "Cute Without the 'E' (Cut from the Team)" on Launch.com.[33] The video, conceived and directed by Winters, was inspired by the 1999 film Fight Club (a favorite of Nolan and Lazzara).[14] Lazzara's original idea for the video had men fighting women, which was rejected by Winters and Victory Records[34] before Lazzara and Winters expanded it in the final version.[14] In January 2003, Taking Back Sunday toured with the Used and the Blood Brothers.[35] They headlined the Takeover Tour in March and April, with support from From Autumn to Ashes and Recover.[36]

[We] named it Tell All Your Friends, kind of in a half-joking manner, because we were very aware that any of our success was due to word of mouth and just people telling your friends.[37]

– John Nolan in 2005 on the album's title

Nolan (citing exhaustion from touring) left the band, and Cooper followed shortly afterwards. According to Lazzara, Nolan and Cooper were "having trouble because everything was happening so fast. Going from being home ... to being gone all the time and having your whole life consumed and almost defined by the band that you’re in is a lot to handle". The band briefly considered breaking up.[38] Nolan and Cooper formed Straylight Run with Nolan's sister, Michelle, and Breaking Pangaea drummer Will Noon.[39] From June to August 2003, the group was part of the Warped Tour.[40] Reyes contacted his friend, Breaking Pangaea frontman Fred Mascherino, who auditioned for Nolan's place;[38] on August 5, it was announced that Mascherino was a member of the band.[39] Bassist Matt Rubano, who grew up with O'Connell, then joined the group.[38] Rubano was asked to audition by O'Connell but was initially hesitant, since he was not a fan of emo music[41] or aware of the band; however, he bought the album and learned Cooper's parts.[42]

On September 16, "You're So Last Summer" was released as a radio single.[43] From September to November Taking Back Sunday co-headlined a tour with Saves the Day, supported by Moneen.[44] In November, a music video for "You're So Last Summer" was filmed at Fulton State Park in New York. The video, directed by Winters,[45] debuted on MTV on November 24.[46] In the video, the band plays while Public Enemy vocalist Flavor Flav (in full regalia) jumps. According to Lazzara, the group was making fun of itself: "We had two guys leave our band and there were two main singers, so we were trying to think of a way to bring the new band members into the video, but not have Fred singing the old guy’s part. And the funniest way to do that was to use Flavor Flav."[38]

Reception and legacy[edit]

Original release
Review scores
Source Rating
AllMusic 4/5 stars[47]
BBC Music Favorable[21]
CMJ New Music Monthly Favorable[48]
Rolling Stone 3/5 stars[49]

Critical response[edit]

According to AllMusic reviewer Kurt Morris, Tell All Your Friends is similar to the Movielife's This Time Next Year (2000); Taking Back Sunday's "ability ... to sound so blatantly" like the Movielife was "almost their undoing". Morris wrote that the vocals strongly resembled those of the Canterbury Effect, and called Taking Back Sunday "a bit more rockin'" than the Movielife: "They have cultivated punk, hardcore, emo, and pop and hybridized it better." However, Morris called the album "nowhere near original or creative".[47] Rolling Stone's Gil Kaufman wrote that the album "sidesteps many sad-sack emo pitfalls" with "pop-infused hardcore" and "enlightened, dramatic lyrics" describing "heartache that teeter[s] between despondency and dark vengeance".[49]

CMJ New Music Monthly writer Andrew Bonazelli noted musical similarities to fellow Victory band Thursday. In Tell All Your Friends, "a series of double teams, two guitars butt heads", merging "clean-channel pop melodies" with "chugging metal progressions" to create "cathartic, schizophrenic anthems". Bonazelli called the songs "bombast[ic]" and "occasionally dazzling".[48] Olli Siebelt wrote for BBC Music that the band brought "a welcome mix of original styles to an overcrowded playing field", with "an interesting mix of southern Californian post-punk, nu-metal and old school hardcore". According to Siebelt, Taking Back Sunday composed "fantastically catchy songs" which were "poppy and fun" and "upbeat and emotionally aggressive." Siebelt compared the album to All and the Descendents, retaining "enough of its own identity" to lift the band above its peers.[21]

Commercial performance[edit]

Although it was reported that 15,000 copies had been shipped,[26] only 2,000 copies were sold in Tell All Your Friends' first week of release.[50] The album spent one week (at number 183) on the Billboard 200,[51][52] and 68 weeks on the Heatseekers Albums chart, peaking at number 9.[52][53] It spent 78 weeks on the Independent Albums chart, peaking at number 8,[54] and peaked at number 23 on the Catalog Albums chart.[55] Despite little airplay, Tell All Your Friends sold 110,000 copies by March 2003;[28] near the end of the year, sales stood at 252,000.[56] By April 2004 the album had sold nearly 400,000 copies,[57] and by September 2005 it was certified gold by the RIAA.[58] By May 2009, the album had sold 790,000 copies. Tell All Your Friends is Taking Back Sunday and Victory Records' best-selling release.[59] It would also become Victory's longest-running record on the Billboard Heatseekers and Independent Albums charts.[60]

Accolades, retrospective reviews and legacy[edit]

Retrospective reviews
Review scores
Source Rating
AbsolutePunk 92%[16]
Alternative Press 5/5 stars[61]
Sputnikmusic 5/5 stars[62]
Stylus Magazine Favorable[63]

According to Alternative Press' Philip Obenschain, Tell All Yor Friends "has remained one of the scene's most celebrated and influential releases".[14] Despite its "not be[ing] their best sounding, most mature or highest in ambition ... it’s Tell All Your Friends' intangible and emotionally charged energy, the uncertainty, the earnestness and the rough edges that make it so special".[64] The album was included in Rock Sound's 101 Modern Classics list at number 13, and the magazine considered it "[t]he Hybrid Theory of emo."[65] NME listed it as one of "20 Emo Albums That Have Resolutely Stood The Test Of Time".[66]

Chris Collum wrote for AbsolutePunk that Tell All Your Friends "grabs the listener’s attention from the start" and the album expressed "feelings that are completely genuine, not contrived, rehearsed or formulaic, without being over-the-top or sappy". Collum called Lazzara and Nolan's vocal delivery "rapid-fire" in a "back-and-forth way, as if they were carrying on a dialogue, [that] allows you to really attach to and get a sense of the raw emotion behind the songs".[16] In a retrospective review for Alternative Press, Brendan Manley wrote that the album "is as close as it gets to a modern masterpiece, capturing not just a band at their apex, but an entire scene". According to Manley, Tell All Your Friends was "the crossover breaking point, finally bringing what had been percolating for years in East Coast VFW Halls to the attention of the masses".[61] Channing Freeman of Sputnikmusic wrote that the album features "power chords and clean strums and palm muting and reverb". About whether this was negative, Freeman said, "With songs this good, it shouldn't be ... It's all here, solid and undeniably catchy".[62] Jonathan Bradley wrote for Stylus Magazine that although the album "is notable not so much for being a blueprint as it is a playbook", it would "provide the perfect How-To guide for teenagers with guitars all over the United States and beyond."[63]

Tell All Your Friends was performed live in its entirety at Bamboozle 2011.[67] In a 2011 interview with CMJ, Adam Lazzara and John Nolan chose the album's final track ("Head Club") as their least-favorite Taking Back Sunday song.[68] To celebrate Tell All Your Friends' 10th anniversary, the band toured the U.S. in October and November 2012 with support from Bayside.[69] In November the album charted on the Billboard Vinyl Albums chart, peaking at number 8.[70] In June 2013, the band released a live acoustic version of the album and a companion film, TAYF10 Acoustic.[71] The recordings were made in Los Angeles and Chicago. In September, the band performed two electric versions of the album in New Jersey.[72] TAYF10 Acoustic and TAYF10: Live from Starland Ballroom were released as a double-DVD set in December, and TAYF10 Acoustic was released on vinyl.[73] In 2014, Cooper said that Warner Bros. wanted the group to re-record Tell All Your Friends during the Louder Now (2006) sessions; Cooper replied, "Are you nuts?"[74] In 2015, Lazzara said that he disliked his vocals on the album: "I was just yelling everything hoping it fit in there somehow, trying to paint with some strange color".[19]

Track listing[edit]

All music written by Taking Back Sunday. All lyrics written by Adam Lazzara and John Nolan.[12]

  1. "You Know How I Do" – 3:21
  2. "Bike Scene" – 3:35
  3. "Cute Without the 'E' (Cut from the Team)" – 3:31
  4. "There's No 'I' in Team" – 3:48
  5. "Great Romances of the 20th Century" – 3:35
  6. "Ghost Man on Third" – 3:59
  7. "Timberwolves at New Jersey" – 3:23
  8. "The Blue Channel" – 2:30
  9. "You're So Last Summer" – 2:59
  10. "Head Club" – 3:01
Bonus tracks

Personnel[edit]

Personnel per booklet[12] and back cover.[23]

Chart positions and certifications[edit]

Notes and references[edit]

Footnotes
  1. ^ This event later inspired Brand New to include "Seventy Times 7" on their debut album, Your Favorite Weapon (2001). Nolan wrote about the event from his point of view in Taking Back Sunday's "There's No 'I' in Team", and he and Lacey later reconciled.[5]
  2. ^ Lacey became hostile towards Lazzara and Taking Back Sunday. This situation, according to Alternative Press, "spawned one of the most public intra-band rivalries in emo history."[6] In 2015, Lazzara described Lacey as "a dick. He just sucks. He's not a good person."[7]
  3. ^ Rubenstein, Lacey, Nolan and Lazzara were part of a songwriting collective known as the Long Island Band Pool. If a musician had a lyric they could not use, they suggested it to another member of the collective. Lazzara called it "a real communal thing happening at the time."[10] Rubenstein contributed the lines "best bet worst ex" to "Bike Scene" and "Don't call my name out your window; I'm leaving" to "Head Club".[12]
  4. ^ U.S. Victory VR176[26]
Citations
  1. ^ a b c Jennings, Harriet (March 26, 2012). "Tell All Your Friends - A Decade Under The Influence Of Taking Back Sunday". DIY. Retrieved July 17, 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Tatone, Jenny (April 19, 2016). "Taste Of Tuesday: Looking back at musical thrills and offstage spills with Taking Back Sunday". Alternative Press. Retrieved July 16, 2016. 
  3. ^ Manley, Brendan (January 2, 2013). "An Oral History of LI Music Scene's Class of '02-'03". Long Island Press. Retrieved July 14, 2016. 
  4. ^ Crane, Matt (April 11, 2014). "When your head goes through the windshield: the 10 best moments of the TBS/Brand New feud". Alternative Press. p. 1. Retrieved July 13, 2016. 
  5. ^ Cameron, Greg (April 17, 2015). "The 10 best Brand New songs". Alternative Press. Retrieved June 30, 2016. 
  6. ^ a b c d Karan, Tim (April 24, 2009). "I Used To Be In Taking Back Sunday". Alternative Press. Retrieved July 13, 2016. 
  7. ^ Deiterman, Corey (February 27, 2015). "Adam Lazzara of Taking Back Sunday Says His Band Was Never Emo". OC Weekly. Retrieved August 14, 2016. 
  8. ^ "Mark O'Connell". SABIAN Cymbals. Retrieved July 14, 2016. 
  9. ^ a b c "Victory Bands -- Taking Back Sunday". Victory Records. Archived from the original on February 12, 2002. Retrieved July 15, 2016. 
  10. ^ a b c d Karan, Tim (May 23, 2011). "A Peek Into Taking Back Sunday's Early Days—In Their Own Words". Alternative Press. Retrieved July 14, 2016. 
  11. ^ Spano, Charles. "Taking Back Sunday | Biography & History". AllMusic. Retrieved July 9, 2016. 
  12. ^ a b c d e f g h Tell All Your Friends (Booklet). Taking Back Sunday. Victory. 2002. VR230. 
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h i Wallace, Jake. "AbsolutePunk - Taking Back Sunday". AbsolutePunk.net. Archived from the original on August 18, 2002. Retrieved July 15, 2016. 
  14. ^ a b c d e f g Obenschain, Philip (July 8, 2013). "BackTracking: Taking Back Sunday on "Cute Without The 'E' (Cut From The Team)"". Alternative Press. Retrieved July 14, 2016. 
  15. ^ Taking Back Sunday 2005, event occurs at 2:32–46
  16. ^ a b c Collum, Christ (October 18, 2009). "Taking Back Sunday - Tell All Your Friends - Album Review". AbsolutePunk.net. Archived from the original on May 18, 2013. Retrieved July 17, 2016. 
  17. ^ "Taking Back Sunday Leak". Ultimate Guitar Archive. July 22, 2004. Retrieved August 17, 2016. 
  18. ^ Taking Back Sunday 2005, event occurs at 3:03–12
  19. ^ a b O'Neil, Luke (February 6, 2015). "Taking Back Sunday's Frontman Thinks The 'Emo Revival' Is Ridiculous: Here's Why". MTV. Retrieved July 18, 2016. 
  20. ^ Bayer, Jonah (March 1, 2016). "40 Greatest Emo Albums of All Time". Rolling Stone. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  21. ^ a b c Siebelt, Olli (2002). "Review of Taking Back Sunday - Tell All Your Friends". BBC Music. Retrieved May 20, 2015. 
  22. ^ a b Sciarretto, Amy (April 26, 2006). "Interview With Taking Back Sunday: Now Tell Them Louder". The Aquarian Weekly. p. 1. Retrieved August 17, 2016. 
  23. ^ a b Tell All Your Friends (Back cover). Taking Back Sunday. Victory. 2002. VR230. 
  24. ^ Manley 2011, p. 92
  25. ^ "Victory Records - News". Victory Records. Archived from the original on June 4, 2002. Retrieved July 15, 2016. 
  26. ^ a b c d e f Hart 2002, p. 36
  27. ^ Bird, ed. 2015, p. 29
  28. ^ a b Levine 2003, p. 39
  29. ^ Crane, Matt (April 11, 2014). "When your head goes through the windshield: the 10 best moments of the TBS/Brand New feud". Alternative Press. p. 2. Retrieved July 14, 2016. 
  30. ^ Heisel, Scott (August 22, 2002). "Midtown heads on "Best Revenge" Tour". Punknews.org. Retrieved July 16, 2016. 
  31. ^ "Band drops from bill at M-Shop". Iowa State Daily. September 23, 2002. Retrieved July 16, 2016. 
  32. ^ Heisel, Scott (November 12, 2002). "Northstar e-card and tour info". Punknews.org. Retrieved July 9, 2016. 
  33. ^ "Victory Records - News". Victory Records. Archived from the original on February 8, 2003. Retrieved July 15, 2016. 
  34. ^ Miller, Kirk (February 25, 2003). "Taking Back Sunday Win Friends". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on November 9, 2007. Retrieved July 17, 2016. 
  35. ^ Heisel, Scott (January 7, 2003). "The Blood Brothers to take over the world". Punknews.org. Retrieved July 9, 2016. 
  36. ^ Heisel, Scott (February 12, 2003). "Taking Back Sunday announces dates for the Takeover Tour". Punknews.org. Retrieved July 9, 2016. 
  37. ^ Taking Back Sunday 2005, event occurs at 11:07–22
  38. ^ a b c d Wiederhorn, Jon (June 24, 2004). "Taking Back Sunday Are Taking Back The Summer This Year". MTV. Retrieved June 29, 2016. 
  39. ^ a b Heisel, Scott (August 5, 2003). "Taking Back Sunday and Breaking Pangaea - torrid tales of forbidden incest!". Punknews.org. Retrieved July 9, 2016. 
  40. ^ D'angelo, Joe (January 21, 2003). "Warped Tour Dates Announced, 17 More Bands Added". MTV. Retrieved June 29, 2016. 
  41. ^ "Ex-Taking Back Sunday bassist opens up about getting kicked out". Alternative Press. January 21, 2016. Retrieved July 13, 2016. 
  42. ^ Duckett, Jodi; Righi, Len; Moser, John (August 26, 2006). "Making sense of the music". The Morning Call. Retrieved August 4, 2016. 
  43. ^ "FMQB Airplay Archive: Modern Rock". Friday Morning Quarterback Album Report, Incorporated. Retrieved June 30, 2016. 
  44. ^ Goldstein, Jeremy P. (September 14, 2003). "Saves The Day Is Taking Back Sunday (Out On The Road)". The Fader. Retrieved July 9, 2016. 
  45. ^ Orshoski ed. 2003, p. 45
  46. ^ "Victory Records - News". Victory Records. Archived from the original on December 6, 2003. Retrieved July 15, 2016. 
  47. ^ a b Morris, Kurt. "Tell All Your Friends - Taking Back Sunday | Songs, Reviews, Credits". AllMusic. Retrieved July 16, 2016. 
  48. ^ a b Bonazelli 2002, p. 58
  49. ^ a b Kaufman, Gil (March 18, 2003). "Taking Back Sunday: Tell All Your Friends : Music Reviews". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on November 30, 2007. Retrieved July 17, 2016. 
  50. ^ Sharpe-Young 2005, p. 303
  51. ^ a b "Taking Back Sunday - Chart history (Billboard 200)". Billboard. Retrieved June 30, 2016. 
  52. ^ a b Mayfield 2004, p. 68
  53. ^ a b "Taking Back Sunday - Chart history (Heatseekers Albums)". Billboard. Retrieved June 30, 2016. 
  54. ^ a b "Taking Back Sunday - Chart history (Independent Albums)". Billboard. Retrieved June 30, 2016. 
  55. ^ a b "Taking Back Sunday - Chart history (Catalog Albums)". Billboard. Retrieved June 30, 2016. 
  56. ^ "Billboard Bits: Bruce/Fox, Taking Back Sunday, Fire Relief". Billboard. November 11, 2003. Retrieved July 13, 2016. 
  57. ^ Reesman 2004, p. 18
  58. ^ "Gold & Platinum". RIAA. Retrieved June 29, 2016. 
  59. ^ a b Wood 2009, p. 43
  60. ^ Reesman 2004, p. 24
  61. ^ a b Manley, Brendan (June 14, 2010). "Taking Back Sunday - Tell All Your Friends". Alternative Press. Retrieved July 16, 2016. 
  62. ^ a b Freeman, Channing (January 31, 2009). "Review: Taking Back Sunday - Tell All Your Friends". Sputnikmusic. Retrieved May 20, 2015. 
  63. ^ a b Bradley, Jonathan (July 11, 2006). "Taking Back Sunday - Tell All Your Friends - On Second Thought". Stylus Magazine. Retrieved July 16, 2016. 
  64. ^ Obenschain, Philip (June 27, 2014). "And the best Taking Back Sunday album of all time is…". Alternative Press. Retrieved July 15, 2016. 
  65. ^ "Rock Sound's 101 Modern Classics: The Final Instalment!". Rock Sound Magazine. July 11, 2012. Retrieved July 6, 2015. 
  66. ^ "20 Emo Albums That Have Resolutely Stood The Test Of Time". NME.com. January 14, 2015. Retrieved July 29, 2015. 
  67. ^ Huntington, Kyle (May 1, 2011). "Taking Back Bamboozle". AbsolutePunk.net. Archived from the original on April 13, 2014. Retrieved July 17, 2016. 
  68. ^ "CMJ TV: Taking Back Sunday". YouTube. 2011-06-22. Retrieved 2012-03-11. 
  69. ^ "Taking Back Sunday Plot 'Tell All Your Friends' Anniversary Tour". DIY. August 7, 2012. Retrieved July 16, 2016. 
  70. ^ a b "Taking Back Sunday - Chart history (Vinyl Albums)". Billboard. Retrieved June 30, 2016. 
  71. ^ "Taking Back Sunday announce 'Tell All Your Friends Acoustic'". Big Cheese. June 6, 2013. Retrieved July 16, 2016. 
  72. ^ Jamieson, Sarah (June 5, 2013). "Taking Back Sunday To Release 'Tell All Your Friends' Acoustic". DIY. Retrieved July 16, 2016. 
  73. ^ Obenschain, Philip (November 19, 2013). "Taking Back Sunday to self-release 'TAYF10: Acoustic' vinyl, double DVD with 'Live From Starland'". Alternative Press. Retrieved July 16, 2016. 
  74. ^ Tate, Jason (April 14, 2014). "Warner Brothers Wanted Taking Back Sunday to Re-Record Debut Album - News Article". AbsolutePunk.net. Archived from the original on May 3, 2014. Retrieved July 17, 2016. 
  75. ^ "American album certifications – Taking Back Sunday – Tell All Your Friends". Recording Industry Association of America.  If necessary, click Advanced, then click Format, then select Album, then click SEARCH
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  • Sharpe-Young, Garry (2005). New Wave of American Heavy Metal (1st ed.). New Plymouth, NZ: Zonda Books. ISBN 9780958268400. 
  • Taking Back Sunday (2005). Exclusive Interview With Original Members (Enhanced CD). Victory. VR286-2. 
  • Wood, Mikael (May 16, 2009). "Sunday Styles". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 121 (19). ISSN 0006-2510. 

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