Congress of the Republic of Peru

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Coordinates: 12°02′53″S 77°01′30″W / 12.04806°S 77.02500°W / -12.04806; -77.02500

Congress of the Republic of Peru
Congreso de la República
Logo congreso.png
Type
Type
Leadership
President of Congress
1st Vice President of Congress
Modesto Julca
Possible Peru
since July 26, 2014
2nd Vice President of Congress
3rd Vice President of Congress
Esther Capuñay
National Solidarity
since July 26, 2014
Structure
Seats 130
(since 2011)
Political groups
     Peru Wins (47)
     Force 2011 (36)
     Possible Peru (21)
     Alliance for the Great Change (12)
     National Solidarity (8)
     Peruvian Aprista Party (4)
Elections
Last election
April 10, 2011
Next election
2016
Meeting place
Palacio Legislativo (Plaza Bolívar, Lima 01)
Website
Congress of the Republic of Peru
Gran Sello de la República del Perú.svg
This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
Peru
Constitution

The Congress of the Republic of Peru (Spanish: Congreso de la República) or the National Congress of Peru (Spanish: Congreso Nacional del Perú) is the unicameral body that assumes legislative power in Peru.

The congress consists of 130 members (congresistas), who are elected for five-year periods in office on a proportional representation basis. To be eligible, candidates must be Peruvian citizens, have passed their 25th birthday, and not have had their right to vote suspended. The last congressional election was held on April 10, 2011, concurrently with the presidential election.

Since July 26, 2014, the President of Congress is Ana María Solórzano, of the Peruvian Nationalist Party.

Currently, the Peruvian congress congregates at the Palacio Legislativo, which is located in the Historical Center of Lima, across the road from Plaza Simón Bolívar and a few blocks away from Casa de Pizarro.

Historical[edit]

The first Peruvian Congress was installed in 1822 as the Constitutional Congress lead by Francisco Xavier de Luna Pizarro. In 1829, the government installed a bicameral Congress, made up by a Senate and a Chamber of Deputies. This system was interrupted by a number of times by Constitutional Congresses that promulgated new Constitutions that lasted for a couple of years. The Deputies reunited in the Legislative Palace and the Senators went to the former Saint Inquisition of Lima until 1930, when Augusto B. Leguía was overthrown by Luis Miguel Sánchez Cerro. He installed a Constitutional Congress (1931–1933) that promulgated the Constitution of 1933. By order of the president, the Peruvian Aprista Party members that were in Congress were arrested for there revolutionary doctrines against the government. When Sánchez Cerro was assassinated in 1933 by an APRA member, General Óscar R. Benavides took power and closed Congress until 1939, when Manuel Prado Ugarteche was elected President. During various dictatorships, the Congress was interrupted by coups d'état. In 1968, Juan Velasco Alvarado overthrew president Fernando Belaúnde by a coup d'état, closing again the Congress.

The 1979 Constitution was promulgated on July 12, 1979 by the Constitutional Assembly elected following 10 years of military rule and replaced the suspended 1933 Constitution. It became effective in 1980 with the re-election of deposed President Fernando Belaúnde. It limited the president to a single five-year term and established a bicameral legislature consisting of a 60-member Senate (upper house) and a 180-member Chamber of Deputies (lower house). Members of both chambers were elected for five-year terms, running concurrently with that of the president. Party-list proportional representation was used for both chambers: on a regional basis for the Senate, and using the D'Hondt method for the lower house. Members of both houses had to be Peruvian citizens, with a minimum age of 25 for deputies and 35 for senators. At the beginning of the 1990s, the bicameral congress had a low public approval rating. President Alberto Fujimori did not have the majority in both chambers, the opposition lead the Congress, imposing the power that Fujimori had as President. He made the decision of dissolving Congress by a self-coup to his government in 1992.

Following the self-coup, in which Congress was dissolved, the Democratic Constitutional Congress established a single chamber of 120 members. The CCD promulgated the 1993 Constitution in which gave more power to the President. The new unicameral Congress started working in 1995, dominated by Fujimori's Congressmen that had the majority. The Congress permits a one-year term for a Congressman to become President of Congress.

Composition of the Peruvian Congress[edit]

Peruvian Congress of 1995-2000[edit]

On July 27, 1995 a new unicameral Congress was created with the following distribution by political party:

Peruvian Congress of 2000-2001[edit]

On July 27, 2000 the Congress of the Republic was established. This Congressional period was marked with various episodes of members of Congress switching their party affiliation. The following distribution marks seats by party at the end of the 2000-2001 term:

Peruvian Congress of 2001-2006[edit]

On July 21, 2001 a new Congress of the Peruvian Republic was established the following is a distribution of Congress members by political party affiliation:

Peruvian Congress of 2006-2011[edit]

A new Peruvian Congress of the Republic was established in July 2006 with the following distribution:

Peruvian Congress of 2011-2016[edit]

Committees[edit]

Committee Chairperson Vice Chairperson
Agrarian Juan Castagnino (PP) Tomás Zamudio (PNP)
Science, Innovation and Technology Jesús Hurtado (PF) Sergio Tejada (PNP)
Foreign Commerce and Tourism Luciana León (CP) Cecilia Chacón (PF)
Constitution and Rule Santiago Gastañadui (PNP) Víctor Andrés García Belaúnde (AP)
Culture and Cultural Heritage Aldo Bardález (PF) Cenaida Uribe (PNP)
Consumer Protection and Regulatory Agencies of Public Services Agustín Molina (PNP) Julio Gagó (PF)
National Defence, Internal Order, Alternative Development and Drug Control José Urquizo (PNP) Luis Iberico (APGC)
Decentralization, Regionalization, Local Government and Modernization of the Management of the State Richard Acuña (APGC) Pedro Spadaro (PF)
Economics, Banking, Finance and Financial Intelligence Fernando Andrade (PP) Johnny Cárdenas (PNP)
Education, Youth and Sports Daniel Mora (PP) Julio Rosas (PF)
Energy and Mines Teófilo Gamarra (PNP) Nestor Valqui (PF)
Supervision and Comptrollership Gustavo Rondón (SN) Mariano Portugal (PP)
Social Inclusion and Persons with Disabilities Jhon Reynaga (PNP) Gian Carlo Vacchelli (PF)
Intelligence Ana María Solorzano (PNP) Carlos Tubino (PF)
Justice and Human Rights Marisol Pérez Tello (APGC) Heriberto Benítez (PF)
Women and Family Aurelia Tan (PF) Gladys Condori (PNP)
Budget and General Account of the Republic Josue Gutiérrez (PNP) Rolando Reátegui (PF)
Production, Small Business Administration and Cooperatives Fredy Sarmiento (PF) Doris Oseda (PNP)
Andean, Amazonian and Afro-Peruvianmen, Environment and Ecology Víctor Raúl Grandez (PNP) Eduardo Nayap (PF)
Foreign Relations Víctor Andrés García Belaúnde (AP) Lourdes Alcorta (APGC)
Health and Population Karla Schaefer (PF) Jaime Valencia (PNP)
Labor and Social Security Juan Díaz[disambiguation needed] (PF) Yohny Lescano (AP)
Transportation and Communications Rogelio Canches (PNP) Wuilian Monterola (PP)
Housing and Construction Manuel Merino (PNP) Carlos Bruce (CP)

List of Presidents of the Congress of the Republic[edit]

List of Presidents of the Senate (1980-1992)[edit]

Presidents of the Senate of the Republic
Beginning of Term End of Term Name of President Political Party
July 26, 1980 July 26, 1981 Julio Óscar Trelles Montes Popular Action
July 26, 1981 July 26, 1982 Javier Alva Orlandini Popular Action
July 26, 1982 July 26, 1983 Sandro Mariátegui Chiappe Popular Action
July 26, 1983 July 26, 1984 Ricardo Monteagudo Monteagudo Popular Action
July 26, 1984 July 26, 1985 Manuel Ulloa Elías Popular Action
July 26, 1985 July 26, 1986 Luis Alberto Sánchez Sánchez Peruvian Aprista Party
July 26, 1986 July 26, 1987 Armando Villanueva del Campo Peruvian Aprista Party
July 26, 1987 February 25, 1988 Ramiro Prialé Prialé¹ Peruvian Aprista Party
February 25, 1988 July 26, 1988 Jorge Sixto Lozada Stambury² Peruvian Aprista Party
July 26, 1988 July 26, 1989 Romualdo Biaggi Rodríguez Peruvian Aprista Party
July 26, 1989 July 26, 1990 Humberto Carranza Piedra Peruvian Aprista Party
July 26, 1990 July 26, 1991 Máximo San Román Cáceres Change 90-New Majority
July 26, 1991 April 5, 1992 Felipe Osterling Parodi³ Christian People's Party
  • ¹ Ramiro Prialé died on February 25 of 1988.
  • ² Jorge Lozada assumed the Presidency of the Senate after the death of Ramiro Prialé, because he was the Vice-President of the Chamber.
  • ³ Felipe Osterling's presidency was interrupted when President Fujimori dissolved Congress in 1992.

List of Presidents of the Chamber of Deputies (1980-1992)[edit]

Presidents of the Chamber of Deputies of the Republic
Beginning of Term End of Term Name of President Political Party
July 26, 1980 July 26, 1981 Francisco Belaúnde Terry Popular Action
July 26, 1981 July 26, 1982 Luis Pércovich Roca Popular Action
July 26, 1982 July 26, 1983 Valentín Demetrio Paniagua Corazao Popular Action
July 26, 1983 July 26, 1984 Dagoberto Láinez Vodanovic Popular Action
July 26, 1984 July 26, 1985 Elías Mendoza Habersperger Popular Action
July 26, 1985 July 26, 1986 Luis Alberto Negreiros Criado Peruvian Aprista Party
July 26, 1986 July 26, 1987 Fernando León de Vivero Peruvian Aprista Party
July 26, 1987 July 26, 1988 Luis Alva Castro Peruvian Aprista Party
July 26, 1988 July 26, 1989 Héctor Vargas Haya Peruvian Aprista Party
July 26, 1989 January 26, 1990 Fernando León de Vivero¹ Peruvian Aprista Party
January 26, 1990 July 26, 1990 Luis Alvarado Contreras² Peruvian Aprista Party
July 26, 1990 July 26, 1991 Víctor Felipe Paredes Guerra Change 90-New Majority
July 26, 1991 April 5, 1992 Roberto Ramírez del Villar Beaumont³ Christian People's Party
  • ¹ Fernando León de Vivero died on January 26 of 1990.
  • ² Luis Alvarado assumed the Presidency of the Chamber after the death of Fernando León De Vivero, because he was the 1st Vice-President of the Chamber.
  • ³ Roberto Ramírez del Villar presidency was interrupted when President Fujimori dissolved Congress in 1992.

Presidents of the Congress of the Republic (1995-Present)[edit]

Presidents of the Congress of the Republic
Beginning of Term End of Term Name of President Political Party
July 27, 1995 July 26, 1996 Martha Chávez Change 90-New Majority
July 27, 1996 July 26, 1997 Víctor Joy Way Change 90-New Majority
July 27, 1997 July 26, 1998 Carlos Torres y Torres Lara Change 90-New Majority
July 27, 1998 July 26, 1999 Víctor Joy Way Change 90-New Majority
July 27, 1999 July 26, 2000 Martha Hildebrandt Change 90-New Majority
July 27, 2000 November 13, 2000 Martha Hildebrandt Peru 2000
November 13, 2000 November 16, 2000 Luz Salgado¹ Peru 2000
November 16, 2000 November 22, 2000 Valentín Paniagua Corazao² Popular Action
December 15, 2000 July 26, 2001 Carlos Ferrero Costa³ Possible Peru
July 27, 2001 July 26, 2002 Carlos Ferrero Costa Possible Peru
July 27, 2002 July 26, 2003 Carlos Ferrero Costa Possible Peru
July 27, 2003 July 26, 2004 Henry Pease Possible Peru
July 27, 2004 July 26, 2005 Antero Flores Aráoz National Unity (Christian People's Party)
July 27, 2005 July 26, 2006 Marcial Ayaipoma Possible Peru
July 27, 2006 July 26, 2007 Mercedes Cabanillas Peruvian Aprista Party
July 27, 2007 July 26, 2008 Luis Gonzales Posada Peruvian Aprista Party
July 27, 2008 July 11, 2009 Javier Velásquez Peruvian Aprista Party
July 11, 2009 July 26, 2009 Alejandro Aguinaga Alliance for the Future
July 27, 2009 July 26, 2010 Luis Alva Castro Peruvian Aprista Party
July 27, 2010 July 26, 2011 Cesar Zumaeta Peruvian Aprista Party
July 26, 2011 July 26, 2012 Daniel Abugattás Peruvian Nationalist Party
July 26, 2012 July 26, 2013 Víctor Isla Peruvian Nationalist Party
July 26, 2013 July 26, 2014 Fredy Otárola Peruvian Nationalist Party
July 22, 2014 July 26, 2014 Luis Iberico Alliance for Progress
July 26, 2014 Ana María Solórzano Peruvian Nationalist Party
  • ¹ Luz Salgado temporarily assumed the position of President of Congress after a motion to censure President Hildebrandt.
  • ² Valentìn Paniagua, was elected President of Congress and as such simultaneously served as President of the Transitional Government.
  • ³ Carlos Ferrero Costa, was assigned to President of Congress by an agreement between different political parties.

See also[edit]

External links[edit]