Finn (dinghy)

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Current Specifications
Finn dinghy.svg
Finn black.svg
Class Symbol
Crew 1
LOA 4.5 m (14 ft 9 in)
LWL 4.34 m (14 ft 3 in)
Beam 1.47 m (4 ft 10 in)
Draft 0.17 m (6.7 in)
Hull weight 107 kg (236 lb)
Mast height 6.66 m (21 ft 10 in)
Mainsail area 10.6 m2 (114 sq ft)
D-PN 90.1[1]
RYA PN 1060[2]
Infobox last updated: 13 Aug 2012 [1]
Olympic Class

The Finn dinghy is the men's single-handed, cat-rigged Olympic class for sailing. It was designed by Swedish canoe designer, Rickard Sarby, in 1949 for the 1952 Summer Olympics in Helsinki. Since the 1952 debut of the boat, the design has been in every summer Olympics, making it one of the most prolific Olympic sailboats as it is the longest serving dinghy in the Olympic Regatta.[3] It currently fills the slot for the Heavyweight Dinghy at the Olympic games. It has been contended that the Finn is the most physical and tactical singlehander sailboat in the world.[4]

Design Changes[edit]

Finn dinghies
Finn dinghy

Although the Finn hull has changed little since 1949, there have been developments to the rig. The original spars were made of wood until the late 60’s and early 70’s when there was a slow change to aluminum masts. Aluminum is significantly more flexible and gives more control over sail shape. It became common place after the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich when they were first supplied to Olympic sailors. Recently, carbon fiber masts have become common place in competitive Finn fleets. The sails too have gone through revolution and are now commonly made of Kevlar. The class rules are overseen by the International Finn Association.

Events[edit]

Olympic Games[edit]

Year Gold Silver Bronze
1952:
Finland

details

 Denmark (DEN)
Paul Elvstrøm

 Great Britain (GBR)
Charles Currey

 Sweden (SWE)
Rickard Sarby

1956:
Australia

details

 Denmark (DEN)
Paul Elvstrøm

 Belgium (BEL)
André Nelis

 United States (USA)
John Marvin

1960:
Italy

details

 Denmark (DEN)
Paul Elvstrøm

 Soviet Union (URS)
Aleksander Tšutšelov

 Belgium (BEL)
André Nelis

1964:
Japan

details

 Germany (EUA)
Wilhelm Kuhweide

 United States (USA)
Peter Barrett

 Denmark (DEN)
Henning Wind

1968:
Mexico

details

 Soviet Union (URS)
Valentin Mankin

 Austria (AUT)
Hubert Raudaschl

 Italy (ITA)
Fabio Albarelli

1972:
West Germany

details

 France (FRA)
Serge Maury

 Greece (GRE)
Ilias Hatzipavlis

 Soviet Union (URS)
Viktor Potapov

1976:
Canada

details

 East Germany (GDR)
Jochen Schümann

 Soviet Union (URS)
Andrei Balashov

 Australia (AUS)
John Bertrand

1980:
Soviet Union

details

 Finland (FIN)
Esko Rechardt

 Austria (AUT)
Wolfgang Mayrhofer

 Soviet Union (URS)
Andrei Balashov

1984:
United States

details

 New Zealand (NZL)
Russell Coutts

 United States (USA)
John Bertrand

 Canada (CAN)
Terry Neilson

1988:
South Korea

details

 Spain (ESP)
Jose Doreste

 Virgin Islands (ISV)
Peter Holmberg

 New Zealand (NZL)
John Cutler

1992:
Spain

details

 Spain (ESP)
José van der Ploeg

 United States (USA)
Brian Ledbetter

 New Zealand (NZL)
Craig Monk

1996:
United States

details

 Poland (POL)
Mateusz Kusznierewicz

 Belgium (BEL)
Sebastien Godefroid

 Netherlands (NED)
Roy Heiner

2000:
Australia

details

 Great Britain (GBR)
Iain Percy

 Italy (ITA)
Luca Devoti

 Sweden (SWE)
Fredrik Lööf

2004:
Greece

details

 Great Britain (GBR)
Ben Ainslie

 Spain (ESP)
Rafael Trujillo

 Poland (POL)
Mateusz Kusznierewicz

2008:
China

details

 Great Britain (GBR)
Ben Ainslie

 United States (USA)
Zach Railey

 France (FRA)
Guillaume Florent

2012:
Great Britain

details

 Great Britain (GBR)
Ben Ainslie

 Denmark (DEN)
Jonas Høgh-Christensen

 France (FRA)
Jonathan Lobert

Open World Championships[edit]

The Finn Gold cup recognised as the World Championship for the Finn class International Sailing Federation

Junior World Championship[edit]

Master World Championship[edit]

Continental Championships[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]