Triple J Hottest 100

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Hottest 100)
Jump to: navigation, search

The Triple J Hottest 100 is an annual music poll based on the votes of listeners of national Australian radio station, Triple J, to determine their favourite song of the year. Voting for the previous year's songs is conducted on the internet and begins roughly two weeks prior to the new year. The 100 most popular songs are then counted down on Australia Day.[1] The poll attracts over half a million votes every year (increasing constantly from 500,000 in 2004 to 2.03 million in 2014) and is promoted as "the world's greatest music democracy".

History[edit]

1988–1991: Introduction[edit]

The idea for the poll came from triple j producer Lawrie Zion. Late in 1988, he conceived the idea of the station running a listener poll to determine their 100 favourite songs of all time. The idea was influenced by Brisbane community radio station 4zzz, which developed its Hot 100 in 1976.

For the inaugural poll, before triple j had become a national broadcaster, Sydney listeners were required to write their 10 favourite tracks down on the back of an envelope. Some entries were sent into the station, written on a variety of items, including paintings, sculptures, and hand-rolled cannabis cigarettes.[1] The results of the first poll were counted down on Sunday 5 March 1989 between 10am and 6pm.

The station repeated the event the following year when it started broadcasting to other capital cities besides Sydney. In 1991, triple j was forced to change the poll's name to 'Hottest 100' to avoid legal action with 4zzz.

During the poll's first few years—1989 to 1991—the winner in the first two years was "Love Will Tear Us Apart" by Joy Division, while 1991's favourite song was "Smells Like Teen Spirit" by Nirvana (which was also released that year). Realising that the poll's results were unlikely to significantly change from year to year, triple j rested the Hottest 100 in 1992 and relaunched it as an annual poll the following year. The newly launched poll required listeners to vote for their favourite songs of that year.

After its beginnings as a write-in poll, the Hottest 100 progressed to phone-in voting, which then progressed to SMS and online voting. In 2003, it was only possible to vote on the Triple J website, with registration required and a limited of 10 votes applied. In 2004, the guidelines were expanded so that voters were entitled to 10 internet votes, and 10 SMS votes.

1992–2002: Hottest 100 CD and DVD[edit]

The inaugural Hottest 100 compilation CD, Triple J Hottest 100 (The Hottest Of The Hottest), was released by ABC Music in 1994. Denis Leary's "Asshole" was voted in the number-one position in that year, while the radio-edited version of Ween's "Pushin' Up The Daisies", featuring a sample of musician Prince howling in place of the word "shit", appeared on the CD.[2]

The first Hottest 100 DVD, Triple J Hottest 100: The Hottest Videos For 2002, was released in 2002. Queens Of The Stone Age's "No One Knows" was voted into the top position in that year, while Grinspoon, Motor Ace, Darren Hanlon, Machine Translations and Ms Dynamite were other Hottest 100 artists featured on the release.[3]

2003–present: Powderfinger, Chet Faker[edit]

Powderfinger became the first act to feature three times in the top 10 of the poll in 2003: "(Baby I’ve Got You) On My Mind", "Sunsets" and "Love Your Way" placed in the 4th, 7th and 10th places, respectively.[4] All three songs appeared on the 2003 Vulture Street full-length studio album, which attained "6 x Platinum" sales in Australia.[5][6]

Chet Faker, whose real name is Nick Murphy, repeated Powderfinger's achievement from 2003, by placing three times in the top 10 positions, including the number-one ranking for the song "Talk Is Cheap". The other two songs were "Gold" and "1998", which ranked in the 7th and 8th positions, respectively, while all three songs were from the 2014 album Built On Glass. Faker places a total of four times in the entire poll, with a cover version of Sonia Dada's "Lover You Don't Treat Me No Good No More" in 22nd position. The 22nd Hottest 100 poll received a record 2,099,707 million votes, cast by 258,762 voters from 188 countries.[7]

Notable artists[edit]

In the 25 years since its inception, the bands who have featured the most are Powderfinger, with 22 songs between the 1996 and 2009 countdowns, and the Foo Fighters who charted 22 times between 1995 and 2014. In 2011, it was incorrectly stated that Foo Fighters were the band with the most appearances.[8] Powderfinger's frontman, Bernard Fanning, has taken out the top spot on three occasions, twice with Powderfinger in 1999 and 2000 and once as a solo artist in 2005.

Dave Grohl has appeared 32 times throughout the countdown including the top spot on two occasions (1991, 2002). Although, 13 of these appearances are from the Hottest 100 Of All Time countdowns. He has appeared 4 times with Nirvana, 22 with Foo Fighters, 5 with Queens of The Stone Age and once with Them Crooked Vultures. In fact, Grohl has appeared in most countdowns run by Triple J, only excluding those in 1989, 1990, 2001, 2003, 2004, 2008, 2010 and 2012.

Robert Smith of The Cure has appeared 34 times throughout the countdown's lifetime. However, 28 of these were in the All Time countdowns. 5 more entires came from countdowns between 1993 and 1997, to date, a final appearance was through a collaboration with Crystal Castles in 2010.

Controversy[edit]

#Tay4Hottest100[edit]

Following a 13 January 2015 article on BuzzFeed titled "Why Isn’t Everyone Voting For 'Shake It Off' In The Hottest 100?" by Mark Di Stefano—also a former triple j newsreader—the "#Tay4Hottest100" hashtag campaign began during the voting period for the Hottest 100 poll for 2014. The campaign led to a significant amount of media coverage as Australian music fans debated the merits of Taylor Swift's inclusion in the poll, including the potential for a number-one ranking. According to those critical of the campaign, the Hottest 100 is reserved for non-mainstream artists who were "discovered or fostered by triple j." and provides valuable exposure for artists in the outer circles of the music industry.[9][10]

The campaign led to a public discourse about the broader cultural implications of the controversy generated by Swift, which included accusations of cultural elitism. The Guardian‍ '​s Elle Hunt wrote: "... the virulent response to #Tay4Hottest100 has revealed the persistence of a dichotomy I’d thought we’d thrown out long ago: that of high art versus low."[11][12] Writing for The Conversation on 23 January 2015, Charles Darwin University academic Gemma Blackwood concluded:

The cultural and economic meanings attached to the celebrity-sign of "Taylor Swift" seems antithetical to Triple J’s self-representation as a place for exciting new music, with a supposed focus on emerging Australian talent. This perhaps explains why Swift is excluded from the playlist when other "mainstream" American artists and chart toppers ... are still played on the station heavily: the alignment and transfer of values of what is considered "cool" and "hip" between the station and its chosen artists ... The concept of "youth" seems to be used in reference to a musical market and to identify particular music genres rather than being a real or an accurate signifier of young tastes and interests. It raises the question: what responsibility does a national youth broadcaster have in the shaping and the adapting of young musical interests?[13]

Blackwood thanks Swift's fans for "providing an outlet for discussion of some big ideas about national musical tastes and values".[13]

Station manager Chris Scaddan told the media that the Swift campaign is within the rules of the poll, later instructing triple j employees not to comment to "media, friends, family" about the campaign, as "it will all become clear when we get to the countdown next Monday." The station said: "we don’t comment on voting campaigns whilst Hottest 100 voting is open. It draws attention to them and may influence the results of the poll."[14] Marketing website Mumbrella suggested on 20 January that a Facebook post by KFC incorporating the "#Tay4Hottest100" hashtag was against the Hottest 100 rules and could see Swift disqualified.[15] Also on 20 January, the Guardian submitted a freedom of information request to the ABC in regard to the station's response to the campaign.[16]

After journalist Peter Vincent reported that the Swift campaign had "swallowed" the Hottest 100 for 2014, citing research from the University of Queensland that showed that over 7,341 Hottest 100 posts in a 30-day period leading up to the poll results related to Swift, "Shake It Off" was eventually disqualified by the radio station in an announcement on 26 January 2015. The official announcement read: "it became pretty clear, pretty quick that a lot of people just wanted to prod some ‘hipsters’ for the lulz", acknowledging that the station "had a heap of fun", while Swift is "smart", "cool" and "successful". The song would have placed in the number-12 position if it had been allowed to compete.[17][18]

On the inside cover of the Triple J Hottest 100 Volume 22 CD, bold capital initials spell out "TAYLOR SWIFT BAN".

Hottest 100 top tens and summaries[edit]

Year Top ten Highlights
All time (1989)
  1. Joy Division – "Love Will Tear Us Apart" (1980)
  2. Hunters & Collectors – "Throw Your Arms Around Me" (1985)
  3. The The – "Uncertain Smile" (1983)
  4. The Jam – "That's Entertainment" (1980)
  5. New Order – "Blue Monday" (1983)
  6. Dead Kennedys – "Holiday in Cambodia" (1980)
  7. The Smiths – "How Soon Is Now?" (1984)
  8. Hunters & Collectors – "Talking to a Stranger" (1982)
  9. The Sugarcubes – "Birthday" (1987)
  10. The Cure – "A Forest" (1980)
All time (1990)
  1. Joy Division – "Love Will Tear Us Apart" (1980)
  2. Hunters & Collectors – "Throw Your Arms Around Me" (1985)
  3. The Smiths – "How Soon Is Now?" (1984)
  4. The The – "Uncertain Smile" (1983)
  5. New Order – "Blue Monday" (1983)
  6. The Stone Roses – "Fools Gold" (1989)
  7. The Smiths – "This Charming Man" (1983)
  8. The B-52's – "Rock Lobster" (1978)
  9. R.E.M. – "It's the End of the World as We Know It (And I Feel Fine)" (1987)
  10. The Jam – "That's Entertainment" (1980)
  • The second of the original series of Hottest 100s which allowed choices from any year.
  • The Cure achieved seven songs in the list.
All time (1991)
  1. Nirvana – "Smells Like Teen Spirit" (1991)
  2. Joy Division – "Love Will Tear Us Apart" (1980)
  3. Nirvana – "Lithium" (1991)
  4. Hunters & Collectors – "Throw Your Arms Around Me" (1985)
  5. Andy Prieboy – "Tomorrow Wendy" (1990)
  6. The Smiths – "How Soon Is Now?" (1984)
  7. The Stone Roses – "Fools Gold" (1989)
  8. The Cure – "A Forest" (1980)
  9. Violent Femmes – "Blister in the Sun" (1982)
  10. New Order – "Blue Monday" (1983)
  • The third of the original series of Hottest 100s which allowed choices from any year.
  • The Cure had nine songs in the 1991 list. Although not a part of the official countdowns, this record remains unbroken as of 2011.
1992 No Hottest 100 Held
1993
  1. Denis Leary – "Asshole"
  2. Radiohead – "Creep"
  3. The Cranberries – "Linger"
  4. Blind Melon – "No Rain"
  5. The Breeders – "Cannonball"
  6. Rage Against The Machine – "Killing in the Name"
  7. U2 – "Lemon"
  8. Pearl Jam – "Go"
  9. The Cruel Sea – "The Honeymoon Is Over"
  10. Atomic Swing – "Stone Me Into the Groove"
  • Return after list hiatus in 1992.
  • The new format only allowed songs released as singles within the list's calendar year.
  • The Cruel Sea achieved three tracks in the list.
1994
  1. The Cranberries – "Zombie"
  2. Nine Inch Nails – "Closer"
  3. The Offspring – "Self Esteem"
  4. The Offspring – "Come Out and Play"
  5. Silverchair – "Tomorrow"
  6. Veruca Salt – "Seether"
  7. Nirvana – "About a Girl"
  8. Max Sharam – "Coma"
  9. Tom Jones – "If I Only Knew"
  10. Severed Heads – "Dead Eyes Opened"
  • Zombie becomes the first No. 1 song with a female vocalist.
  • Soundgarden achieved four tracks in the list.
  • The Offspring scored back to back tracks at positions No. 3 and 4; the first time in an official countdown that a band scored two songs in the top 5.
1995
  1. Oasis – "Wonderwall"
  2. The Smashing Pumpkins – "Bullet with Butterfly Wings"
  3. Coolio – "Gangsta's Paradise"
  4. The Presidents of the United States of America – "Kitty"
  5. Björk – "It's Oh So Quiet"
  6. Everclear – "Heroin Girl"
  7. Custard – “Apartment"
  8. Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds and Kylie Minogue – "Where the Wild Roses Grow"
  9. TISM – "(He'll Never Be An) Ol' Man River"
  10. TISM – "Greg! The Stop Sign!!"
1996
  1. Spiderbait – "Buy Me a Pony"
  2. Tool – "Stinkfist"
  3. Ben Folds Five – "Underground"
  4. Butthole Surfers – "Pepper"
  5. Bush – "Glycerine"
  6. Powderfinger – "Pick You Up"
  7. The Prodigy – "Breathe"
  8. Allen Ginsberg – "Ballad of the Skeletons"
  9. Weezer – "El Scorcho"
  10. Babybird – "You're Gorgeous"
1997
  1. The Whitlams – "No Aphrodisiac"
  2. Blur – "Song 2"
  3. Chumbawamba – "Tubthumping"
  4. The Verve – "Bitter Sweet Symphony"
  5. Radiohead – "Paranoid Android"
  6. Blink 182 – "Dammit"
  7. Pauline Pantsdown – "Back Door Man"
  8. Marilyn Manson" – "The Beautiful People"
  9. Radiohead – "Karma Police"
  10. Jebediah – "Leaving Home"
1998
  1. The Offspring – "Pretty Fly (for a White Guy)"
  2. Ben Lee – "Cigarettes Will Kill You"
  3. Custard – “Girls Like That (Don't Go For Guys Like Us)"
  4. Hole – "Celebrity Skin"
  5. KoЯn – "Got the Life"
  6. Regurgitator – "! (Song Formerly Known As)"
  7. Jebediah – "Harpoon"
  8. Powderfinger – "The Day You Come"
  9. You Am I – "Heavy Heart"
  10. The Living End – "Save the Day"
  • Regurgitator scored four tracks in the list. Frontman Quan Yeomans was involved with six tracks (including three in succession from No. 26 to No. 28): four with Regurgitator and twice with Happyland.
  • The list included two versions of the song "Harpoon": the original by Jebediah at No. 7 and Something for Kate's cover at No. 85.
All Time (1998)
  1. Nirvana – "Smells Like Teen Spirit" (1991)
  2. Hunters & Collectors – "Throw Your Arms Around Me" (1985)
  3. Pearl Jam – "Alive" (1991)
  4. Jeff Buckley – "Last Goodbye" (1994)
  5. Radiohead – "Creep" (1992)
  6. Led Zeppelin – "Stairway to Heaven" (1971)
  7. Metallica – "One" (1988)
  8. Queen – "Bohemian Rhapsody" (1975)
  9. Metallica – "Enter Sandman" (1991)
  10. Pearl Jam – "Black" (1991)
  • Compiled and played in August 1998.
  • Hosted by Robbie Buck, who played the wrong song by Led Zeppelin for No. 6, which was supposed to be "Stairway to Heaven".[citation needed]
  • Grinspoon's track "Just Ace", and the Ben Folds Five track "Brick" are the only songs to chart in an All Time countdown before an official yearly countdown.
  • The Cure achieved five entries on the list.
1999
  1. Powderfinger – "These Days"
  2. Killing Heidi – "Weir"
  3. The Tenants – "You Shit Me to Tears"
  4. Fatboy Slim – "Praise You"
  5. Placebo – "Every You Every Me"
  6. The Bloodhound Gang – "The Bad Touch"
  7. Rage Against The Machine – "Guerrilla Radio
  8. Limp Bizkit – "Nookie"
  9. Pearl Jam – "Last Kiss"
  10. Red Hot Chili Peppers – "Scar Tissue"
  • Powderfinger and Silverchair scored four tracks each.
  • The 1999 countdown held the record for the most Australian artists in a countdown, with 52. This record was equaled in the 2007 countdown, and later broken in the 2014 countdown.
  • Killing Heidi set the record for the highest ranking song by an Unearthed artist. This record was broken by Vance Joy who won the countdown in 2013.
2000
  1. Powderfinger – "My Happiness"
  2. U2 – "Beautiful Day"
  3. Powderfinger – "My Kind of Scene"
  4. Wheatus – "Teenage Dirtbag"
  5. Coldplay – "Yellow"
  6. The Avalanches" – "Frontier Psychiatrist"
  7. Red Hot Chili Peppers" – "Californication"
  8. Foo Fighters – "Generator"
  9. Paul Kelly – "Every Fucking City"
  10. The Dandy Warhols – "Bohemian Like You"
  • Rage Against the Machine achieved three tracks.
  • Powderfinger became the first and, to date, only artist to have two Hottest 100 No. 1 tracks, in 1999 and 2000. (Frontman Bernard Fanning would later have a third No. 1 as a solo artist in 2005, and Powderfinger would also later win in the Hottest 100 Australian Albums countdown in 2011.)
  • Powderfinger became the second band to achieve two songs in the top five, the first (and only to date) Australian band to do so.
2001
  1. Alex Lloyd – "Amazing"
  2. Something for Kate – "Monsters"
  3. System of a Down – "Chop Suey!"
  4. Basement Jaxx – "Where's Your Head At?"
  5. John Butler Trio – "Betterman"
  6. Alien Ant Farm – "Smooth Criminal"
  7. Weezer – "Island in the Sun"
  8. The Avalanches – "Since I Left You"
  9. Gorillaz featuring Del tha Funkee Homosapien – "Clint Eastwood"
  10. Cake – "Short Skirt/Long Jacket"
2002
  1. Queens of the Stone Age – "No One Knows"
  2. Grinspoon – "Chemical Heart"
  3. The Waifs – "London Still"
  4. 1200 Techniques – "Karma"
  5. The Vines – "Get Free"
  6. Machine Gun Fellatio – "Pussytown"
  7. Eminem – "Lose Yourself"
  8. Machine Gun Fellatio – "Rollercoaster"
  9. Red Hot Chili Peppers – "By the Way"
  10. Silverchair – "The Greatest View"
  • Queens of the Stone Age and Silverchair scored five tracks each.
  • Dave Grohl was involved with ten tracks (including three in succession from No. 11 to No. 13): five with Queens of the Stone Age, four with the Foo Fighters, and one with Nirvana. This is a record that as of 2011, still stands.
  • Grinspoon equal Killing Heidi's record of the Highest placing of a Triple J Unearthed artist at No. 2. This record was broken by Vance Joy who won the countdown in 2013.
  • Mark Lanegan became the oldest person to win the Hottest 100. He was 42 when it was announced that "No One Knows" won the countdown.
2003
  1. Jet – "Are You Gonna Be My Girl"
  2. OutKast – "Hey Ya!"
  3. The White Stripes – "Seven Nation Army"
  4. Powderfinger – "(Baby I've Got You) On My Mind"
  5. ColdplayClocks (Röyksopp Remix)
  6. The Cat Empire – "Hello"
  7. Powderfinger – "Sunsets"
  8. John Butler Trio – "Zebra"
  9. Hilltop Hoods – "The Nosebleed Section"
  10. Powderfinger – "Love Your Way"
2004
  1. Franz Ferdinand – "Take Me Out"
  2. Missy Higgins – "Scar"
  3. Eskimo Joe – "From the Sea"
  4. The Killers – "Somebody Told Me"
  5. Spiderbait – "Black Betty"
  6. Missy Higgins – "Ten Days"
  7. John Butler Trio – "Something's Gotta Give"
  8. Little Birdy – "Beautiful to Me"
  9. Powderfinger – "Bless My Soul"
  10. The White Stripes – "Jolene" (live)
  • John Butler Trio and the Scissor Sisters scored four tracks each.
  • The list included two versions of the song "Take Me Out": the original by Franz Ferdinand at No. 1 and Scissor Sisters' cover at No. 44.
  • At No. 5, Spiderbait's cover of Black Betty ties becomes the highest ranked cover version in a Hottest 100 countdown.
  • Missy Higgins's "Scar" is the equal highest ranking song by an Unearthed artist. It is tied with Killing Heidi in 1999 and Grinspoon in 2002. This record was broken by Vance Joy who won the countdown in 2013.
2005
  1. Bernard Fanning – "Wish You Well"
  2. Ben Lee – "Catch My Disease"
  3. Gorillaz featuring De La Soul – "Feel Good Inc."
  4. Foo Fighters – "Best of You"
  5. Gorillaz featuring Shaun Ryder – "DARE"
  6. Wolfmother – "Mind's Eye"
  7. The White Stripes – "My Doorbell"
  8. End of Fashion – "O Yeah"
  9. Wolfmother – "Joker & the Thief"
  10. Franz Ferdinand – "Do You Want To"
  • Wolfmother had six tracks selected, the most ever by an artist in a single countdown.
  • Gorillaz became the third band to placed twice in the Top 5.
  • Bernard Fanning achieves a Hottest 100 No. 1 for the third time (the only artist to do so to date), including twice with Powderfinger in 1999 and 2000.
  • Ben Lee achieves No. 2 for the second time.
2006
  1. Augie March – "One Crowded Hour"
  2. Eskimo Joe – "Black Fingernails, Red Wine"
  3. Hilltop Hoods – "The Hard Road"
  4. The Killers – "When You Were Young"
  5. Scissor Sisters – "I Don't Feel Like Dancin'"
  6. Gnarls Barkley – "Crazy"
  7. Snow Patrol – "Chasing Cars"
  8. Gotye – "Hearts a Mess"
  9. Muse – "Starlight"
  10. The Grates – "19-20-20"
2007
  1. Muse – "Knights of Cydonia"
  2. Silverchair – "Straight Lines"
  3. Kings of Leon – "On Call"
  4. John Butler Trio – "Better Than"
  5. Faker – "This Heart Attack"
  6. Foo Fighters – "The Pretender"
  7. Daft Punk – "Harder, Better, Faster, Stronger (Alive 2007)"
  8. Cold War Kids – "Hang Me Up to Dry"
  9. Soko – "I'll Kill Her"
  10. The Panics – "Don't Fight It"
2008
  1. Kings of Leon – "Sex on Fire"
  2. MGMT – "Electric Feel"
  3. Kings of Leon – "Use Somebody"
  4. Empire of the Sun – "Walking on a Dream"
  5. MGMT – "Kids"
  6. The Presets – "Talk Like That"
  7. Pez Featuring 360 and Hailey Cramer – "The Festival Song"
  8. The Presets – "This Boy's in Love"
  9. The Ting Tings – "That's Not My Name"
  10. Drapht – "Jimmy Recard"
  • Both Kings of Leon and Vampire Weekend scored four tracks each.
  • Both Kings of Leon and MGMT placed twice in the Top 5, the fourth and fifth artists to do so.
  • The 2008 countdown marked the first time since 1995 that no Australian artist has featured in the Top 3 songs.
All Time (2009)
  1. Nirvana – "Smells Like Teen Spirit" (1991)
  2. Rage Against the Machine – "Killing in the Name" (1992)
  3. Jeff Buckley – "Hallelujah" (1994)
  4. Joy Division – "Love Will Tear Us Apart" (1980)
  5. Radiohead – "Paranoid Android" (1997)
  6. Queen – "Bohemian Rhapsody" (1975)
  7. Jeff Buckley – "Last Goodbye" (1994)
  8. Red Hot Chili Peppers – "Under the Bridge" (1991)
  9. Foo Fighters – "Everlong" (1997)
  10. Led Zeppelin – "Stairway to Heaven" (1971)
2009
  1. Mumford & Sons – "Little Lion Man"
  2. Art vs. Science – "Parlez Vous Francais?"
  3. Hilltop Hoods – "Chase That Feeling"
  4. Phoenix – "Lisztomania"
  5. Bluejuice – "Broken Leg"
  6. La Roux – "Bulletproof"
  7. Lisa Mitchell – "Coin Laundry"
  8. Lily Allen – "Not Fair"
  9. Muse – "Uprising"
  10. Florence and the Machine – "Dog Days Are Over"
2010
  1. Angus & Julia Stone – "Big Jet Plane"
  2. Little Red – "Rock It"
  3. Ou Est Le Swimming Pool – "Dance the Way I Feel"
  4. Birds of Tokyo – "Plans"
  5. Boy & Bear – "Fall at Your Feet"
  6. Adrian Lux – "Teenage Crime"
  7. Cee-Lo Green – "Fuck You"
  8. The Wombats – "Tokyo (Vampires & Wolves)"
  9. Art vs. Science – "Magic Fountain"
  10. Mark Ronson & The Business Intl. featuring Boy George and Andrew Wyatt – "Somebody to Love Me"
Australian Albums (2011)
  1. PowderfingerOdyssey Number Five (2000)
  2. SilverchairFrogstomp (1995)
  3. AC/DCBack in Black (1980)
  4. The Living EndThe Living End (1999)
  5. INXSKick (1987)
  6. Powderfinger – Internationalist (1998)
  7. The PresetsApocalypso (2008)
  8. WolfmotherWolfmother (2005)
  9. The AvalanchesSince I Left You (2000)
  10. RegurgitatorUnit (1997)
  • Compiled in June 2011, and counted down between 28 June and 10 July.
  • The first Hottest 100 countdown that is not based on single tracks.
  • This is now the third Hottest 100 won by Powderfinger.
  • Silverchair and Bernard Fanning both appeared five times in the countdown. Fanning appeared once solo and four times with Powderfinger.
  • Every one of Silverchair's studio albums reached the countdown.
2011
  1. Gotye featuring Kimbra – "Somebody That I Used to Know"
  2. The Black Keys – "Lonely Boy"
  3. Matt Corby – "Brother"
  4. Boy & Bear – "Feeding Line"
  5. M83 – "Midnight City"
  6. Lana Del Rey – "Video Games"
  7. San Cisco – "Awkward"
  8. 360 featuring Gossling – "Boys Like You"
  9. The Jezabels – "Endless Summer"
  10. Hilltop Hoods Featuring Sia – "I Love It"
  • The Wombats and Kimbra chart four times throughout the countdown.
  • This is the first collaboration between artists to win the Hottest 100.
2012
  1. Macklemore and Ryan Lewis featuring Wanz – "Thrift Shop"
  2. Of Monsters and Men – "Little Talks"
  3. Alt-J – "Breezeblocks"
  4. Flume – "Holdin' On"
  5. Mumford & Sons – "I Will Wait"
  6. Major Lazer featuring Amber Coffman – "Get Free"
  7. Tame Impala – "Elephant"
  8. Frank Ocean – "Lost"
  9. Tame Impala – "Feels Like We Only Go Backwards"
  10. The Rubens – "My Gun"
  • Flume had four tracks on the countdown.
  • "Thrift Shop" is the first hip-hop song to top the chart in Hottest 100 history. It also breaks the record of highest ranking hip-hop song, which was previously set by Coolio, Gorillaz & Hilltop Hoods. All of whom managed to place third in 1995, 2005, 2006 & 2009.
  • For the first time since 2008 no Australian artist featured in the Top 3.
  • The four highest charting artists in this year's countdown were all debutantes. This is the first time this has happened since the first countdown in 1993.
20 Years of the Hottest 100 (2013)
  1. Oasis – "Wonderwall" (1995)
  2. The White Stripes – "Seven Nation Army" (2003)
  3. Jeff Buckley – "Last Goodbye" (1994)
  4. Hilltop Hoods – "The Nosebleed Section" (2003)
  5. The Verve – "Bitter Sweet Symphony" (1997)
  6. Foo Fighters - "Everlong" (1997)
  7. The Killers - "Mr. Brightside" (2004)
  8. Powderfinger - "These Days" (2000)
  9. Gotye featuring Kimbra - "Somebody That I Used to Know" (2011)
  10. Powderfinger - "My Happiness" (2000)
  • Voting was held in May 2013, results were broadcast on the 8 and 9 June 2013.
  • Daft Punk, Damon Albarn, Dave Grohl, The Killers and Silverchair all got three tracks.
  • Four tracks in the countdown had not been charted in an annual Hottest 100.
2013
  1. Vance Joy - "Riptide"
  2. Lorde - "Royals"
  3. Daft Punk featuring Pharrell - "Get Lucky"
  4. Arctic Monkeys - "Do I Wanna Know?"
  5. Flume & Chet Faker - "Drop The Game"
  6. Arctic Monkeys - "Why'd You Only Call Me When You're High?"
  7. Lana Del Rey - "Young And Beautiful"
  8. Matt Corby - "Resolution"
  9. The Preatures - "Is This How You Feel?"
  10. London Grammar - "Strong"
  • Daft Punk got four tracks.
  • Two versions of "Get Lucky" appeared in the countdown, the original by Daft Punk at number 3 and San Cisco's cover at number 39; this is the first time it has happened since 2004.
  • Vance Joy is the first Triple J Unearthed artist to place first in the Hottest 100.
2014
  1. Chet Faker - "Talk is Cheap"
  2. Peking Duk featuring Nicole Millar - "High"
  3. Hilltop Hoods - "Cosby Sweater"
  4. Milky Chance - "Stolen Dance"
  5. Peking Duk featuring SAFIA - "Take Me Over"
  6. Mark Ronson featuring Bruno Mars - "Uptown Funk"
  7. Chet Faker - "Gold"
  8. Chet Faker - "1998"
  9. Sia - "Chandelier"
  10. Ásgeir - "King and Cross"
  • Four Chet Faker songs ranked.
  • Chet Faker became the second artist to chart three times in the top 10 places after Powderfinger achieved the feat in 2003.
  • The 2014 countdown featured 59 Australian entries, breaking the previous record of 52, set in 1999 and equaled in 2007.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Hottest 100 History". Triple J. Retrieved 6 October 2008. 
  2. ^ "Various – Triple J Hottest 100 (The Hottest Of The Hottest) - 1". Various on Discogs. Discogs. 2015. Retrieved 21 January 2015. 
  3. ^ "Various – Triple J Hottest 100 - The Hottest Videos For 2002". Various on Discogs. Discogs. 2015. Retrieved 21 January 2015. 
  4. ^ "hottest 100 2003". triple j Hottest 100. ABC. 2015. Retrieved 26 January 2015. 
  5. ^ "Australian Record Sales - 2003 Full Year Figures - 12 Months Ending 31 December 2003". ARIA Australian Recording Industry Association. Australian Recording Industry Association Ltd. 2005–2015. Retrieved 26 January 2015. 
  6. ^ "Powderfinger – Vulture Street". Powderfinger on Discogs. Discogs. 2015. Retrieved 26 January 2015. 
  7. ^ a b "Chet Faker's Talk Is Cheap wins Triple J Hottest 100". Sydney Morning Herald. 26 January 2015. Retrieved 26 January 2015. 
  8. ^ http://hottest100.org/fingervsfoo.html
  9. ^ Peter Vincent (20 January 2015). "Triple J Hottest 100: Has Taylor Swift been dumped from contention due to KFC ad?". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 23 January 2015. 
  10. ^ Sarah Smith (20 January 2015). "Flight Facilities weigh in on Taylor Swift Hottest 100 furore". inthemix. inthemix Pty Ltd. Retrieved 23 January 2015. 
  11. ^ Elle Hunt (19 January 2015). "#Tay4Hottest100: Taylor Swift campaign shows it's time for Triple J to shake off cultural elitism". The Guardian. Retrieved 21 January 2015. 
  12. ^ Mark Di Stefano (13 January 2015). "Why Isn’t Everyone Voting For "Shake It Off" In The Hottest 100?". BuzzFeed. BuzzFeed, Inc. Retrieved 21 January 2015. 
  13. ^ a b Gemma Blackwood (23 January 2015). "Taylor Swift, Triple J and what the youth market really wants to hear". The Conversation. Retrieved 1 February 2015. 
  14. ^ Joe Harris (20 January 2015). "The Guardian Says Triple J Are "Sexist" For Ignoring Taylor Swift, & That's Just Dumb". Tone Deaf. Tone Deaf. Retrieved 21 January 2015. 
  15. ^ Christensen, Nic (20 January 2015). "KFC Facebook post may have disqualified Taylor Swift campaign from Triple J Hottest 100 list". Mumbrella. Retrieved 22 January 2015. 
  16. ^ Elle Hunt (20 January 2015). "Taylor Swift fans have spoken – but will Triple J's Hottest 100 listen?". The Guardian. Retrieved 21 January 2015. 
  17. ^ Cameron Adams (26 January 2015). "Taylor Swift disqualified from Hottest 100". News.com.au. Retrieved 26 January 2015. 
  18. ^ Peter Vincent (23 January 2015). "Taylor Swift campaign has swallowed Triple J Hottest 100". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 26 January 2015. 
  19. ^ Australian Broadcasting Corporation v Hanson - Queensland Judgments - Supreme Court Library
  20. ^ "Countdown: Twenty Years of triple j's Hottest 100". ABC Online. 9 June 2013. Retrieved 9 June 2013. 
  21. ^ "Oz day spoiler: ABC leaks Hottest 100 victor". Crikey. 22 January 2010. Archived from the original on 26 January 2010. Retrieved 22 January 2010. 
  22. ^ "Spoiler alert: Hottest 100 winner leaked". ABC Online. 22 January 2010. Archived from the original on 26 January 2010. Retrieved 22 January 2010. 

External links[edit]