Internet in Botswana

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The Internet in Botswana is used by more than 11% of the population. This is slightly below the figure of 16% for Africa as a whole in 2013.

Statistics[edit]

Internet users by region
  2005b 2010b 2013a,b
Africa       2%             10%             16%      
Americas 36% 49% 61%
Arab States 8% 26% 38%
Asia and Pacific 9% 23% 32%
Commonwealth of
Independent States
 
10%
 
34%
 
52%
Europe 46% 67% 75%
a Estimate. b Per 100 inhabitants.
Source: International Telecommunications Union.[1]
  • Internet users:
    • 241,272 users, 148th in the world; 11.5% of the population, 166th in the world (2012);[3][4]
    • 120,000 users, 154th in the world (2009);[2]
    •   80,000 users (2007).
Broadband subscriptions by region
Fixed subscriptions: 2007a 2010a 2013a,b
Africa 0.1% 0.2% 0.3%
Americas 10.9% 14.1% 17.1%
Arab States 0.9% 1.9% 3.3%
Asia and Pacific 3.2% 5.5% 7.6%
Commonwealth of
Independent States
 
2.3%
 
8.2%
 
13.5%
Europe 18.4% 23.6% 27.0%
Mobile subscriptions: 2007a 2010a 2013a,b
Africa 0.2% 1.8% 10.9%
Americas 6.4% 22.9% 48.0%
Arab States 0.8% 5.1% 18.9%
Asia and Pacific 3.1% 7.4% 22.4%
Commonwealth of
Independent States
 
0.2%
 
22.3%
 
46.0%
Europe 14.7% 28.7% 67.5%
a Per 100 inhabitants. b Estimate.
Source: International Telecommunications Union.[5][1]
  • Internet broadband:
    • 16,407 fixed broadband subscriptions, 134th in the world; 0.8% of the population, 143rd in the world;[3][6]
    • 348,124 wireless broadband subscriptions, 102nd in the world; 16.6% of the population, 76th in the world.[7]

ADSL[edit]

Botswana Telecom rolled out ADSL in early 2006. Current residential ADSL offerings include speeds from 512 kbit/s to 4096 kbit/s with prices from 292 to 863 BWP (~32 to ~97 US$).[10]

ADSL has been introduced in the following areas: Gaborone, Tlkokweng, Mogoditsane, Phakalane, Francistown, Lobatse, Palapye, Maun, Kasane, Selibe-Phikwe, Letlhakane, Jwaneng, and Orapa.[citation needed]

Internet censorship and surveillance[edit]

There are no government restrictions on access to the Internet or credible reports the government monitors e-mail or Internet chat rooms. The constitution and law provide for freedom of speech and press and the government generally respects these rights. The constitution and law prohibit arbitrary interference with privacy, family, home, or correspondence, and the government generally respects these prohibitions in practice.[11]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Key ICT indicators for developed and developing countries and the world (totals and penetration rates)", International Telecommunications Unions (ITU), Geneva, 27 February 2013
  2. ^ a b c "Botswana", World Fact Book, U.S. Central Intelligence Agency, 7 January 2014. Retrieved 21 January 2014.
  3. ^ a b Calculated using penetration rate and population data from "Countries and Areas Ranked by Population: 2012", Population data, International Programs, U.S. Census Bureau, retrieved 26 June 2013
  4. ^ "Percentage of Individuals using the Internet 2000-2012", International Telecommunications Union (Geneva), June 2013, retrieved 22 June 2013
  5. ^ "Key Global Telecom Indicators for the World Telecommunication Service Sector", International Telecommunications Unions (ITU), Geneva, 2011
  6. ^ "Fixed (wired)-broadband subscriptions per 100 inhabitants 2012", Dynamic Report, ITU ITC EYE, International Telecommunication Union. Retrieved on 29 June 2013.
  7. ^ "Active mobile-broadband subscriptions per 100 inhabitants 2012", Dynamic Report, ITU ITC EYE, International Telecommunication Union. Retrieved on 29 June 2013.
  8. ^ Select Formats, Country IP Blocks. Accessed on 2 April 2012. Note: Site is said to be updated daily.
  9. ^ Population, The World Factbook, United States Central Intelligence Agency. Accessed on 2 April 2012. Note: Data are mostly for 1 July 2012.
  10. ^ "Broadband Retail Prices", Botswana Telecommunications Corporation, 1 November 2013. Retrieved 21 January 2014.
  11. ^ "Botswana", Country Reports on Human Rights Practices for 2012, Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor, U.S. Department of State, 22 March 2013. Retrieved 21 January 2014.

External links[edit]