Italy in the Eurovision Song Contest 2011

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Eurovision Song Contest 2011
Country  Italy
National selection
Selection process Sanremo Music Festival 2011
Selection date(s) Semi-finals:
15 February 2011
16 February 2011
17 February 2011
18 February 2011
Final:
19 February 2011
Selected entrant Raphael Gualazzi
Selected song "Follia d'amore"
Finals performance
Final result 2nd, 189 points
Italy in the Eurovision Song Contest
◄2010 Wiki Eurovision Heart (Infobox).svg 2012►

The European Broadcasting Union (EBU) announced that Italy would compete in the Eurovision Song Contest 2011, set to be held in Düsseldorf, Germany. Italy returned to the contest after a 14 year absence, having last competed in the 1997 Contest. The entry was organised by Italian broadcaster Radiotelevisione Italiana (RAI) and finished second after the winning song from Azerbaijan.[1][2]

Background[edit]

Italy was one of the seven participating countries to take part in the first contest in 1956. The Eurovision Song Contest was initially inspired by the Italian Sanremo Music Festival, held annually since 1951 in the city of Sanremo.[3] Since their debut Italy has taken part 37 times, and has won the contest twice - in 1964 with the song "Non ho l'età" (I'm not old enough) performed by Gigliola Cinquetti, and in 1990 with "Insieme: 1992" (Together: 1992) performed by Toto Cutugno. Italy has also come 2nd once - again with Gigliola Cinquetti and the song "", and 3rd four times - including the global hit song "Nel blu dipinto di blu", also known as "Volare", performed by Domenico Modugno in 1958.[4] Italy has also hosted the contest twice - in 1965 in Naples, and in 1991 in Rome.[5][6]

Since their debut Italy has withdrawn from the contest a number of times. The first occurrence was in 1981, claiming that interest in the contest in Italy had diminished.[7] Italy returned in 1983, and withdrew again in 1986, returning the following year.[8][9][10] In 1994 Italy withdrew again, before returning again in 1997.[11][12] After the 1997 Contest Italy withdrew again, and did not return until the 2011 Contest.

Return to Eurovision[edit]

Since their withdrawal in 1997 the EBU, the organisers of the Eurovision Song Contest, had worked hard to bring Italy back to Eurovision. Since the 2009 Contest the country's return - along with that of Monaco and Austria - was made a priority of the EBU.[13]

In September 2010 it was announced by Massimo Liofredi, chairman of Rai 2, that the winner of the fourth series of the Italian version of The X Factor may represent Italy at the Eurovision Song Contest 2011, rather than compete in the Sanremo Music Festival as in previous years. This raised hopes that Italy would return to Eurovision after 14 years of absence.[14] On 2 December 2010 the EBU announced on the official Eurovision website that Italy had applied for the 2011 Contest, set to be held on 10, 12 and 14 May 2011 in Düsseldorf, Germany.[1][2]

Sanremo 2011[edit]

On 1 February, RAI announced that the Italian entry would be chosen through the Sanremo festival 2011, to be held between 15–19 February 2011. A specific jury was set up to choose the artist and song best fit to represent Italy in Düsseldorf, thus, the winner of the Sanremo contest wouldn't necessarily be the Eurovision entrant. [15] All songs competing in both the established artists' section ("Artisti") and the newcomers' section ("Giovani") were eligible for Eurovision. On 19 February, during the final, Raphael Gualazzi, winner of the "Giovani" section with the song "Follia d'amore", was announced as the Italian Eurovision entrant in Düsseldorf, Germany.[16]

The six member jury set up to choose the Eurovision entry was composed of Gianni Morandi, Mauro Mazza (Rai 1 director), Massimo Liofredi (Rai 2 director), Marco Simeon (director of international affairs), Maurizio Zoccarato (mayor of Sanremo) and Giorgio Giuffra (Sanremo's promotional board member).[16]

"Artisti (Big Singers)" section[edit]

Artist Song Translation Songwriters
Roberto Vecchioni "Chiamami ancora amore" Call me love again Roberto Vecchioni, C. Guidetti
Luca Madonia & Franco Battiato "L'alieno" The alien Luca Madonia
Anna Oxa "La mia anima d'uomo" My soul of man Lorenzo Imerico, Anna Oxa, R. Pacco
Al Bano "Amanda è libera" Amanda is free Fabrizio Berlincioni, Albano Carrisi, A. Paoletti
Patty Pravo "Il vento e le rose" The wind and the roses Diego Calvetti, M. Ciapelli
Davide Van De Sfroos "Yanez" Yanez Davide Bernasconi
La Crus "Io confesso" I confess Ermanno Giovanardi, Matteo Curallo
Luca Barbarossa & Raquel del Rosario "Fino in fondo" Through and through Luca Barbarossa
Max Pezzali "Il mio secondo tempo" My second time Max Pezzali
Anna Tatangelo "Bastardo" Bastard Anna Tatangelo
Tricarico "Tre colori" Three colours Fausto Mesolella
Giusy Ferreri "Il mare immenso" The immense sea Bungaro, Giusy Ferreri, Max Calò
Modà feat. Emma "Arriverà" It will come Francesco Silvestre, Enrico Zapparoli, E. Palmosi
Nathalie "Vivo sospesa" I live suspended Natalia Giannitrapani
Position Singer 1st Evening 2nd Evening 3rd Evening 4th Evening 5th Evening
1 Roberto Vecchioni Pass Pass Pass Pass Top Three 1st place
2 Modà with Emma Pass Pass Pass Pass Top Three 2nd place
3 Al Bano Pass Out In Pass Top Three 3rd place
4-6 Luca Madonia and Franco Battiato Pass Pass Pass Pass Top Six Out in-definitely
Davide Van De Sfroos Pass Pass Pass Pass Top Six Out in-definitely
La Crus Pass Pass Pass Pass Top Six Out in-definitely
7-10 Luca Barbarossa and Raquel del Rosario Pass Pass Pass Pass Out in-definitely
Giusy Ferreri Pass Pass Pass Pass Out in-definitely
Nathalie Pass Pass Pass Pass Out in-definitely
Anna Tatangelo Out In Pass Out in-definitely
11-12 Max Pezzali Pass Pass Pass Out in-definitely
Tricarico Pass Pass Pass Out in-definitely
13-14 Patty Pravo Pass Out Out in-definitely
Anna Oxa Out Out in-definitely

Legend:

  Admitted to the next stage
  Rescued
  Eliminated
  Eliminated in-definitively
  1st place
  2nd place
  3rd place
  Top 6, possible rescue with the golden share
  winner of the golden share

"Giovani (New Generation)" section[edit]

Artist Song Translation Songwriters
Roberto Amadè "Come pioggia" Like rain Roberto Amadè
Gabriella Ferrone "Un pezzo d'estate" A piece of summer Giuliano Boursier
Serena Abrami "Lontano da tutto" Away from everything Niccolò Fabi
Micaela "Fuoco e cenere" Fire and ashes A. Santonocito, L. Nigro, F. Muggeo
Raphael Gualazzi "Follia d'amore" Madness of love Raphael Gualazzi
Marco Menichini "Tra tegole e cielo" Between tiles and sky Maurizio Galli, S. Senesi, A. Perrozzi
Anansi "Il sole dentro" The sun inside Stefano Bannò, Pietro Fiabane
BTwins "Mi rubi l'amore" You steal my love S. Grandi, C. Chiodo
Position Singer 2nd Evening 3rd Evening 4th Evening 5th Evening
1 Raphael Gualazzi Pass N/A 1st place Selected as ESC entrant
2 Micaela N/A Pass 2nd place N/A
3 Roberto Amadè N/A Pass 3rd place N/A
4 Serena Abrami Pass N/A 4th place N/A
5-8 Anansi Out N/A
Gabriella Ferrone Out N/A
Marco Menichini N/A Out N/A
BTwins N/A Out N/A

At Eurovision[edit]

Italy automatically qualified for the grand final, in 14 May 2011; as part of the "Big Five", and would vote in the second semi-final. At the finals, the Italian entry performed 12th and in the voting, was placed second to the Azerbaijani entry Running Scared by Ell and Nikki with 189 points.

Points awarded to Italy[edit]

12 points 10 points 8 points 7 points 6 points
5 points 4 points 3 points 2 points 1 point

Points awarded by Italy[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Bakker, Sietse (2 December 2010). "Italy applied for 2011 Eurovision Song Contest!". EBU. Retrieved 3 December 2010. 
  2. ^ a b Jiandani, Sanjay (2010-12-02). "Italy returns to the Eurovision Song Contest!". ESCToday. Retrieved 17 December 2010. 
  3. ^ Staff. "Eurovision Song Contest 1956 – Year page – Eurovision Song Contest - Oslo 2010". European Broadcasting Union. Retrieved 17 December 2010. 
  4. ^ Staff. "History by Country: Italy". European Broadcasting Union. Retrieved 17 December 2010. 
  5. ^ Staff. "Eurovision Song Contest 1965 – Year page – Eurovision Song Contest - Oslo 2010". European Broadcasting Union. Retrieved 17 December 2010. 
  6. ^ Staff. "Eurovision Song Contest 1991 – Year page – Eurovision Song Contest - Oslo 2010". European Broadcasting Union. Retrieved 17 December 2010. 
  7. ^ Staff. "Eurovision Song Contest 1981 – Year page – Eurovision Song Contest - Oslo 2010". European Broadcasting Union. Retrieved 17 December 2010. 
  8. ^ Staff. "Eurovision Song Contest 1983 – Year page – Eurovision Song Contest - Oslo 2010". European Broadcasting Union. Retrieved 17 December 2010. 
  9. ^ Staff. "Eurovision Song Contest 1986 – Year page – Eurovision Song Contest - Oslo 2010". European Broadcasting Union. Retrieved 17 December 2010. 
  10. ^ Staff. "Eurovision Song Contest 1987 – Year page – Eurovision Song Contest - Oslo 2010". European Broadcasting Union. Retrieved 17 December 2010. 
  11. ^ Staff. "Eurovision Song Contest 1994 Year page – Eurovision Song Contest - Oslo 2010". European Broadcasting Union. Retrieved 17 December 2010. 
  12. ^ Staff. "Eurovision Song Contest 1997 Year page – Eurovision Song Contest - Oslo 2010". European Broadcasting Union. Retrieved 17 December 2010. 
  13. ^ Floras, Stella (2009-01-13). "EBU working for Eurovision full house in 2010". ESCToday. Retrieved 17 December 2010. 
  14. ^ Hondal, Victor (2010-09-06). "Italy might return to Eurovision in 2011". ESCToday. Retrieved 18 December 2010. 
  15. ^ M. Escudero, Victor (2011-02-01). "Italy will choose its comeback entry through Sanremo". Eurovision.tv. Retrieved 1 February 2011. 
  16. ^ a b "Italy: Raphael Gualazzi to Düsseldorf". EscDaily.com. 2011-02-19. Retrieved 19 February 2011. 

External links[edit]