Michel Temer

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
His Excellency
Michel Temer
GOIH
Michel Temer.jpg
25th Vice President of Brazil
Incumbent
Assumed office
1 January 2011
President Dilma Rousseff
Preceded by José Alencar
105th President of the Chamber of Deputies of Brazil
In office
2009–2010
President Luis Inácio Lula da Silva
Preceded by Arlindo Chinaglia
Succeeded by Marco Maia
98th President of the Chamber of Deputies of Brazil
In office
1997–2000
President Fernando Henrique Cardoso
Preceded by Luís Eduardo Magalhães
Succeeded by Aécio Neves
Federal Deputy for the state of São Paulo
In office
2007–2010
President Luis Inácio Lula da Silva
Federal Deputy for the state of São Paulo
In office
2003–2007
President Luis Inácio Lula da Silva
Federal Deputy for the state of São Paulo
In office
1999–2003
President Fernando Henrique Cardoso
Federal Deputy for the state of São Paulo
In office
1995–1999
President Fernando Henrique Cardoso
Placeholder Federal Deputy for the state of São Paulo (in full capacity from 1994 onwards)
In office
1991–1995
President Fernando Collor de Mello and Itamar Franco
Placeholder Deputy of the 1988 Constitutional Congress for the state of São Paulo
In office
1987–1991
President José Sarney and Fernando Collor de Mello
Personal details
Born (1940-09-23) September 23, 1940 (age 73)
Tietê, São Paulo, Brazil
Nationality Brazilian
Political party Brazilian Democratic Movement Party
Spouse(s) Marcela Tedeschi Temer
Alma mater Pontifícia Universidade Católica
Religion Roman Catholicism
(prev. Greek Orthodox)

Michel Miguel Elias Temer Lulia (Portuguese pronunciation: [miˈʃɛw miˈɡɛw eˈɫij.jɐʃ ˈtẽmeɾ luˈɫij.jɐ], born September 23, 1940), better known as Michel Temer, is a Brazilian lawyer and politician who has been Vice President of Brazil since January 2011. He took office after standing as the running mate of Workers' Party candidate Dilma Rousseff in the 2010 election.[1] He is also the President of the Brazilian Democratic Movement Party, although he is currently suspended from that office to comply with Brazilian Law and to carry out his duties as Vice-President.

He previously served for six consecutive terms as Federal Deputy for the state of São Paulo in the Chamber of Deputies,[2] and on three separate occasions served two-year terms as President of the Chamber (in 1997-1998, 1999-2000 and 2009-2010).[1] Temer was also a member of the 1988 National Constituent Assembly, which promulgated the current Constitution of Brazil.[1]

Biography and career[edit]

Born in Tietê, São Paulo state, Temer holds a doctorate in Law from the Pontifícia Universidade Católica de São Paulo. He served as State prosecutor and twice as State Secretary for Public Security, in both capacities working in São Paulo. He is a licensed professor of Constitutional Law at PUC-SP, and has authored numerous books on the subject.

Temer with Dilma Rousseff in 2012.

He has five children, including three with his first wife Maria, one resulting from a relationship with a journalist, and one more with current wife Marcela, who is 42 years his junior.

In a TV interview for the Lebanese Broadcasting Corporation (May 8, 2010), Temer indicated that his family originates from the town of Btaaboura in Koura District, neighboring the city of Tripoli in Northern Lebanon.[3] Therefore, he is the second Vice President of Brazil of Lebanese origin after José Maria Alkmin.

Temer has been the recipient of various foreign honors, including the Grand Cross of Dannebrog, the Knighthood of the Order of Prince Henry (Grand Officer) and the Légion d'Honneur.[4]

Preceded by
First
Brazilian presidential line of succession Succeeded by
Henrique Eduardo Alves
Political offices
Preceded by
José Alencar
Vice President of Brazil
2011–present
Incumbent
Preceded by
Jader Barbalho
President of the Brazilian Democratic Movement Party
2001 –
Succeeded by
current
Preceded by
Luís Eduardo Magalhães
President of the Chamber of Deputies of Brazil
1997 – 2000
Succeeded by
Aécio Neves
Preceded by
Arlindo Chinaglia
President of the Chamber of Deputies of Brazil
2009 – 2010
Succeeded by
Marco Maia

External links[edit]

References[edit]