National Association of Black Journalists

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The National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) is an organization of African-American journalists, students, and media professionals. Founded in 1975 in Washington, D.C., by 44 journalists, the NABJ's stated purpose is to provide quality programs and services to and advocate on behalf of black journalists.[1] Tghe organization has worked for diversity and to increase the number of minorities in newsrooms across the country.[2]

The association's national office is on the main campus of the University of Maryland, College Park. The current president is Gregory Lee, Jr., senior assistant sports editor of The Boston Globe, and the executive director is Maurice Foster. The NABJ states that it has a membership of 4,100 and is the largest organization of journalists of color in the United States.[1] The organization was one of the four minority journalist member associations in the UNITY: Journalists of Color, Inc. until they seceded from the organization in the Spring of 2011.

The organization's annual Salute to Excellence Awards honors coverage of African-American people and subjects. Awards given include Journalist of the Year, Emerging Journalist and Lifetime Achievement; past honorees have included Ed Bradley, Carole Simpson, Byron Pitts, Charlayne Hunter-Gault, Bernard Shaw, and Michele Norris. NABJ also maintains the NABJ Hall of Fame, which is designed to honor black journalists.

Annual Convention and Career Fair[edit]

NABJ annually holds the nation's largest journalism convention and career fair each summer with plenary sessions and workshops for career and professional development.

Recent speakers have included former U.S. President Bill Clinton, Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Hillary Rodham Clinton then presidential candidate Barack Obama, and Senegalese President Abdoulaye Wade. The convention features hundreds of recruiters and is among the best means of finding a journalism position in the industry.

The NABJ Career Fair encompasses the nations broadcast, print, and online media including recruiters from Gannett Corporation, NBC News, CNN, Bloomberg, Google, ESPN, The Huffington Post, The New York Times, and Tribune Company.

NABJ held its first convention in October 1976 at Texas Southern University, which at the time had recently established the second school of communications at a historically black college or university in the nation (the first was the School of Communications at Howard University).

Future locations of the NABJ Convention and Career Fair include San Diego, California; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; New Orleans, Louisiana; and Minneapolis, Minnesota.

In October 2014, CNN withdrew its support for the 2015 Convention and Career Fair after the NABJ criticized the network for its lack of diversity on air and its treatment of black employees.[3][4][5][6]

'Awards'

During its Annual Convention and Career Fair, NABJ presents various awards at the annual Salute to Excellence Awards Gala.[7][8]

Journalist of the Year[edit]

  • 1979 Acel Moore, Philadelphia Inquirer, Les Payne, Newsday
  • 1980
  • 1981 Robert C. Maynard, Oakland Tribune, Max Robinson, ABC
  • 1982 Gil Noble, WABC-TV, New York
  • 1983 Joe Ogelsby, Miami Herald
  • 1984 Morris Thompson, Newsday
  • 1985 Kenneth Walker, ABC, Dennis Bell, Newsday
  • 1986 Charlayne Hunter-Gault, PBS
  • 1987 Andrew W. Cooper, City Sun, Brooklyn, NY
  • 1988 Michel duCille, Washington Post
  • 1989 Bernard Shaw, CNN
  • 1990 Maureen Bunyan, WUSA-TV, Washington, DC
  • 1991
  • 1992 Carole Simpson, ABC
  • 1993 Bryant Gumbel, NBC Today
  • 1994 Isabel Wilkerson, New York Times
  • 1995 Andrea Ford, Los Angeles Times [deceased]
  • 1996 Ed Gordon, BET News, NBC
  • 1997 Gary Fields, USA Today
  • 1998 Clarence Williams III, Los Angeles Times
  • 1999 Ron Allen, NBC
  • 2000 Kevin Merida, The Washington Post
  • 2001 Gerald Boyd, The New York Times
  • 2002 Byron Pitts, CBS
  • 2003 George Curry, NNPA
  • 2004 - Hannah Allam (McClatchy Newspapers), Middle East Bureau Chief[9]
  • 2005 - Andy Alford, Austin American-Statesman
  • 2006 - Cynthia Tucker, Atlanta Journal-Constitution
  • 2007 - Dean Baquet, Washington Bureau Chief, New York Times
  • 2008 - Leonard Pitts, (Miami Herald)
  • 2009 - Michele Norris, National Public Radio
  • 2010 - Soledad O'Brien, CNN
  • 2011 – Jacqueline Charles, (Miami Herald)[7]
  • 2012 - Pierre Thomas, ABC News
  • 2013 - Roland S. Martin, TV One[10]
  • 2014 - Stephen Henderson, Detroit Free Press, for his columns on the financial crisis facing his hometown of Detroit[11]

Legacy Award[edit]

  • 2005 - Acel Moore, The Philadelphia Inquirer
  • 2006 - Lawrence E. Young, The Press Enterprise
  • 2007 - Glenn Proctor, The Star-Ledger (Newark, N.J.)
  • 2008 - Evelyn Cunningham, The Pittsburgh Courier
  • 2009 - Leon Carter and Sandy Rosenbush, Sports Journalism Institute
  • 2010 - Paula Madison, NBC Universal
  • 2011 – Claire Smith (ESPN)[7]
  • 2012 - Monica Pearson, WSB-TV (Atlanta)
  • 2013 - Theodore "Ted" Holtzclaw, WABC (New York) (Posthumous)[12]
  • 2014 - Hugh Grannum, photographer (posthumously), Detroit Free Press[13]

Journalism Educator of the Year[edit]

  • 2005 - Karen Clark, Langston University
  • 2006 - Kip Branch, Elizabeth City State University
  • 2007 - Robert Adams & James Highland, Western Kentucky University
  • 2008 - Nagatha Tonkins, North Carolina A&T State University
  • (no 2009 award given)
  • 2010 - James Hawkins, Florida A&M University
  • 2011 – Bonnie Newman Davis, Virginia Commonwealth University[14]
  • 2012 – Allissa Richardson (Morgan State University)[15]
  • 2013 - Michelle Johnson, Boston University[16]
  • 2014 - Dr. Linda Florence Callahan, North Carolina A&T State University[17]

Student Journalist of the Year[edit]

  • 2007 - Eddie Cole, Jr., Tennessee State University
  • 2010 - Philip Lucas, Howard University
  • 2011 – Ashley Williams, University of Southern California[7]
  • 2012 - Eric Burse, USC Annenberg School of Communications
  • 2013 - Marissa A. Evans, Marquette University[18]
  • 2014 - Claudia Balthazar (Hofstra University’s graduate) and Averi Harper (Columbia University graduate)[19]

Community Service Award[edit]

  • 1997 - Joe Madison, WRC-Radio
  • 1998 - Gwen Tolbart, KTVT, Dallas, TX
  • 1999 - C. Ron Allen, Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel
  • 2000 - Andrew Humphrey, WRC-TV, Washington, D.C
  • 2001 - Angela Curry, Kansas City Star
  • 2002 - DeWayne Wickham, USA Today, GNS
  • 2003 - Yvonne Lewis-Harris, KTUL-TV, Channel 8
  • 2004 - Mollie Finch Belt, The Dallas Examiner
  • 2005 - Derek Nathaniel Ali, Dayton Daily News [posthumous]
  • 2006 - DeMarco Morgan, WISN-TV, Milwaukee
  • 2007 - Linda Waller Shockley, Dow Jones Newspaper Fund
  • 2008 - Margaret Bernstein, The Cleveland Plain Dealer
  • (no award given in 2009)
  • 2010 - Michelle Singletary, Founder of First Baptist Church of Glenarden, MD
  • 2011 – Stacey Tisdale, NBC, PBS and WowOWow.com[20]
  • 2012 - Albert Knighten, 107.5 FM
  • 2013 - Dr. Shelley Stewart, The Mattie C. Stewart Foundation[21]
  • 2014 - Michaela Pereira, CNN

Emerging Journalist of the Year[edit]

  • 2003 - Issac Peterson III
  • 2004 - Theola Labbé
  • 2005 - Krissah Williams
  • 2006 - Errin Haines and Trymaine Lee
  • 2007 - Mara Schiavocampo
  • 2008 - Sarah Hoye
  • 2010 - Michael Feeney, Daily News in New York
  • 2009 - Cynthia Gordy
  • 2011 - Kimberley A. Martin, Newsday[22]
  • 2012 - Gerrick Kennedy, LA Times
  • 2013 - Yamiche Alcindor, USA Today[23]
  • 2014 - Wesley Lowery, Washington Post[24]

Pat Tobin Media Professional Award[edit]

  • 2011 - Sheila Brooks, SRB Communications[25]
  • 2012 - Janet Rolle, CNN
  • 2013 - Dawn Kelly, Prudential[26]
  • 2014 - Tiffany R. Warren, ADColor, Omnicom Groups[27]

Chuck Stone Lifetime Achievement Award[edit]

  • 1978 - Mal Goode, ABC News
  • 1979 - Carl Murphy, Afro-American Newspapers
  • 1980 - Carl Rowan, syndicated columnist
  • 1981 - Lerone Bennett Jr., Ebony
  • 1982 - Ethel Payne, Sengstacke Newspapers
  • 1983 - Gordon Parks, Carlton Goodlett, San Francisco Reporter
  • 1984 - Albert Fitzpatrick, Knight-Ridder Inc.
  • 1985 - Lu Palmer, Chicago Sun-Times
  • 1986 - Jimmy Hicks, Amsterdam News [posthumous]
  • 1987 - John H. Johnson, Johnson Publishing Co.
  • 1988 - Armistead Pride, Lincoln University
  • 1989 - Peggy Peterman, St. Petersburg Times
  • 1990 - Vernon Jarrett, Chicago Sun-Times
  • 1991 - Sam Lacy, Afro-American
  • 1992 - Chuck Stone, UNC
  • 1993 - Luix Overbea, Christian Science Monitor
  • 1994 - William Raspberry, Washington Post
  • 1995 - Thomas Morgan III, New York Times
  • 1996 - William Brower, Toledo Blade
  • 1997 - Samuel L. Adams, University of Kansas
  • (no 1998 award given)
  • 1999 - Belva Davis, KPIX-TV, San Francisco
  • 2000 - Joseph A. Palmer Sr., Proud magazine [posthumous] and Dr. Ernest C. Withers Sr., The Withers Studio
  • 2001 - Charles Jackson, Oakland Tribune [posthumous]
  • 2002 - Robert McGruder, Detroit Free Press [posthumous]
  • 2003 - Greg Freeman, St. Louis Post-Dispatch [posthumous]
  • 2004 - Clarence Page, Chicago Tribune
  • 2005 - Ed Bradley, CBS News
  • 2006 - Earl G. Graves, Black Enterprise Magazine
  • 2007 - Bernard Shaw, CNN
  • 2008 - Harry Porterfield, WLS-TV, Chicago
  • 2009 - Michael Wilbon, The Washington Post/ESPN
  • 2010 - Paul Delaney, The New York Times
  • 2011 - Acel Moore, NABJ Founder & Pulitzer Prize Winner[28]
  • 2012 - Les Payne, Newsda
  • 2013 - Gregory L. Moore[29]
  • 2013 - DeWayne Wickham, USA Today, Morgan State University
  • 2014 - Sandra Hughes, former anchor, WFMY-TV, Greensboro, NC[30]

Percy Qoboza Foreign Journalist[edit]

  • 1989 – Zwelake Sisulu, New Nation, South Africa [1st winner]
  • 1994 – Zubeida Jaffer, Cape Town, South Africa
  • 1995 – Kenneth Best, The Daily Observer, Liberia
  • 1996 – Babacar Fall, Pan-African News Agy, Senegal
  • 1997 – Marie-Roger Biloa, Africa International magazine, Paris
  • 1998
  • 1999 – Fred Mmembe, The Post, Zambia
  • 2000 – Rafael Marques, Angola
  • 2002 – Milkias Mihreteab Yohannes, Eritrea
  • 2003 – Geoff Nyarota, The Daily News, Zimbabwe
  • 2004 – Pius Njawe, Cameroon
  • 2005 – Michele Montas, Haiti
  • 2006 – Deyda Hydara, & Members of the Gambian Press Union (Posthumous)
  • 2007 – National Union of Somali Journalists
  • 2008 – Imprisoned Journalists of Eritrea
  • 2011 – Jean-Claude Kavumbagu, Net Press[31]
  • 2012 -
  • 2013 -
  • 2014 -

Best Practices[edit]

  • 2006 - The Indianapolis Recorder
  • 2007 - CNN
  • 2009 - The Chauncey Bailey Project
  • 2010 - NBC Universal
  • 2011 -
  • 2012 - TV ONE
  • 2013 - Washington Post
  • 2014 - Al Jazeera

Student Chapter of the Year[edit]

  • 2006 – Temple Association of Black Journalists
  • 2007 – University of Georgia
  • 2008 – Florida A&M University

Chapter of the Year[edit]

(LIST 1 - SAME NABJ SITE)

  • 1997 – University of Georgia
  • 1998 – Boston Association of Black Journalists Student Consortium
  • 1999 – Penn State Association of Journalists for Diversity
  • 2000 – Atlanta Association of Black Journalists Student Consortium
  • 2001 – Carolina Association of Black Journalists
  • 2002 – Carolina Association of Black Journalists
  • 2003 – University of North Texas
  • 2004 – NABJ Chapter at the University of Oregon
  • 2005 – Northwestern University
  • 2006 – Houston Association of Black Journalists
  • 2007 – Washington Association of Black Journalists
  • 2008 – Philadelphia Association of Black Journalists

(LIST 2 - SAME NABJ SITE)

  • 1996 – Garden State (New Jersey) Association of Black Journalists
  • 1997 – Cleveland Chapter of NABJ
  • 1998 – Richmond Association of Black Journalists
  • 1999 – Atlanta Association of Black Journalists
  • 2000 – Wisconsin Black Media Association
  • 2001 – Detroit Chapter of NABJ
  • 2002 – Houston Association of Black Journalists
  • 2003 – San Diego Association of Black Journalists
  • 2004 – Black Journalists Association of Southern California
  • 2005 – Hampton Roads
  • 2012 – Atlanta Association of Black Journalists
  • 2013 – New York Association of Black Journalists
  • 2014 – Philadelphia Association of Black Journalists

President's Award[edit]

  • 2014 - Carol D. Ash, Kennedy King College and Vince Hill, KYW (Philadelphia)
  • 2013 - Kelley L. Carter, EBONY and Maureen Bunyan, WJLA
  • 2012 - Sarah Glover, NBC10 (Philadelphia)
  • 2011 - Johnathan A. Rodgers, TV ONE
  • 2010 -
  • 2009 - Johnathan A. Rodgers, TV ONE
  • 2008 - Roland Martin, CNN
  • 2007 - Rodney Brooks, USA TODAY
  • 2006 - Ryan Williams, National Association of Black Journalists
  • 2005- Monte Trammer, The Star-Gazette
  • 2004 - Don Hudson, The Clarion-Ledger
  • 2003 - Richard Prince, The Washington Post
  • 2002 - Leonard Pitts, Jr., Miami Herald
  • 2001 - Paula Madison, NBC
  • 2000 - Patsy Pressley, National Association of Black Journalists
  • 1997 - Vernon Jarrett, Chicago Sun-Times
  • 1996 - Bob Johnson, BET
  • 1995 - John Dotson, Akron Beacon Journal
  • 1994 - Nancy Hicks Maynard, Oakland Tribune

Scholarships[edit]

The organization also distributes more than $100,000 in scholarships to African-American college journalism students, places 14-16 students at paid internships and sponsors short courses for students at historically black colleges and universities.

Task Forces[edit]

  • Arts & Entertainment Task Forces - members who cover arts and entertainment
  • Associate Member's - part-time journalists, educators, marketing and public relations professionals
  • Copy Editors - copy desk managers, news editors, design editors
  • Digital Journalism - members on the cutting edge transforming the media landscape
  • NABJ Founders - NABJ Founders, past presidents, and former national board members
  • LGBT Taskforce - lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered members
  • Sports Task Force - sports reporters, correspondents and analysts
  • Visual Task Force - photojournalists, design/informational graphics
  • Young Journalists - journalists in their first few years
  • World Affairs - promotes world-wide coverage of African/African-Americans

Founders[edit]

On December 12, 1975, 44 men and women gathered at the Sheraton Park Hotel in Washington, D.C. (now the Marriott Wardman Park) to form the NABJ. The following are their names and where they worked at the time:[32]

Presidents[edit]

Nineteen people have served as president of the National Association of Black Journalists:

  • Chuck Stone, 1975–77
  • Vernon Jarrett, 1977–79
  • Bob Reid, 1979–81
  • Les Payne, 1981–83
  • Merv Aubespin, 1983–85
  • Al Fitzpatrick, 1985–87
  • DeWayne Wickham, 1987–89
  • Thomas Morgan III, 1989–91
  • Sidmel Estes-Sumpter, 1991–93
  • Dorothy Butler Gilliam, 1993–95
  • Arthur Fennell, 1995–97
  • Vanessa Williams, 1997–99
  • William W. Sutton, Jr., 1999–2001
  • Condace Pressley, 2001–03
  • Herbert Lowe, 2003–05
  • Bryan Monroe, 2005–07
  • Barbara Ciara, 2007–09
  • Kathy Y. Times, 2009–11
  • Gregory Lee, Jr. 2011–present

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b NABJ History/Mission
  2. ^ Rose Creasman Welcome, "Minority Groups Praise BuzzFeed’s Diversity Pledge", American Journalism Review, October 2, 2014.
  3. ^ Eddie Scarry, "Black Journalists Group ‘Concerned’ About CNN", Mediaite, October 16, 2014.
  4. ^ Richard Prince, "CNN’s Restructuring Results in Several Layoffs for Journalists of Color", The Root, October 16, 2014.
  5. ^ Tony Lee, "CNN Pulls Support from Black Journalists' Career Fair After Criticism for Lack of Diversity", Breitbart, October 17, 2014.
  6. ^ Aprill Turner, "CNN Withdraws Support of the National Association of Black Journalists", NABJ News Release, October 17, 2014.
  7. ^ a b c d Turner, Aprill (April 20, 2011). "NABJ Honors Pioneering Sports Journalist, ESPN’s Claire Smith with Annual Legacy Award". National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ). Retrieved 2011-10-21. "[T]he association’s 36th Annual Convention and Career Fair in Philadelphia, PA, ... [was to be held on] Saturday, August 6, 2011." 
  8. ^ List of NABJ Past Award winners
  9. ^ List of NABJ Past Award winners
  10. ^ NABJ Special Honors Award Winners 2013
  11. ^ April Turner, NABJ Announces 2014 Salute to Excellence Awards Finalists, Friday, May 30, 2014, accessed 11/18/2014
  12. ^ NABJ Special Honors Award Winners 2013
  13. ^ April Turner, NABJ Announces 2014 Salute to Excellence Awards Finalists, Friday, May 30, 2014, accessed 11/18/2014
  14. ^ NABJ Special Honors Award Winners 2011
  15. ^ NABJ News.
  16. ^ NABJ Special Honors Award Winners 2013
  17. ^ April Turner, NABJ Announces 2014 Salute to Excellence Awards Finalists, Friday, May 30, 2014, accessed 11/18/2014
  18. ^ NABJ Special Honors Award Winners 2013
  19. ^ April Turner, NABJ Announces 2014 Salute to Excellence Awards Finalists, Friday, May 30, 2014, accessed 11/18/2014
  20. ^ NABJ Special Honors Award Winners 2011
  21. ^ NABJ Special Honors Award Winners 2013
  22. ^ NABJ Special Honors Award Winners 2011
  23. ^ NABJ Special Honors Award Winners 2013
  24. ^ April Turner, NABJ Announces 2014 Salute to Excellence Awards Finalists, Friday, May 30, 2014, accessed 11/18/2014
  25. ^ NABJ Special Honors Award Winners 2011
  26. ^ NABJ Special Honors Award Winners 2013
  27. ^ April Turner, NABJ Announces 2014 Salute to Excellence Awards Finalists, Friday, May 30, 2014, accessed 11/18/2014
  28. ^ NABJ Special Honors Award Winners 2011
  29. ^ NABJ Special Honors Award Winners 2013
  30. ^ April Turner, NABJ Announces 2014 Salute to Excellence Awards Finalists, Friday, May 30, 2014, accessed 11/18/2014
  31. ^ NABJ Special Honors Award Winners 2011
  32. ^ NABJ Founders

External links[edit]