Newspoll

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Newspoll
Headquarters Australia
Website http://www.newspoll.com.au/

Newspoll Market Research is an Australian market research and polling company, part owned by News Corp Australia. Its founding Managing Director was Solomon Lebovic who led the company from 1985 to 2005. Martin O'Shannessy has been CEO since late 2005. While Newspoll is well known for political polling, over 90% of Newspoll's activities are in commercial market research.

Newspoll's surveys of voting intention are published exclusively in The Australian. In addition, many organisations from both sides of the political divide and within the business community have commissioned public opinion polling from Newspoll. Newspoll opinion polls were instrumental in the GetUp! campaign to free David Hicks and also played an important role in industry campaigns to defeat the Mining Tax.

Newspoll was established in 1985 as a joint venture between News Limited and Yann Campbell Hoare Wheeler, which later was purchased by Millward Brown during the 1990s leading to the current ownership structure.

Historical comparison[edit]

Prime Minister polling[edit]

Highest approval rating[edit]

Kevin Rudd has the highest career-peak approval rating with 71% (18–20 April 2008).
John Howard has the second-highest career-peak approval rating, with 67% (10–12 May 1996).
Bob Hawke has the third-highest career-peak approval rating, with 62% (24-26 Jan 1986).

Lowest approval rating[edit]

Paul Keating has the lowest recorded approval rating, of 17% (20–22 August 1993).
Julia Gillard has the second-lowest career-low approval rating, of 23% (2-4 September 2011).
Tony Abbott has the third-lowest career-low approval rating, of 24% (6-8 February 2015).

Highest dissatisfied rating[edit]

Paul Keating has the highest recorded "dissatisfied" rating with 75% (3–5 September 1993).
Julia Gillard has the second-highest career-peak "dissatisfied" rating, with 68% (2–4 September 2011).
Tony Abbott has the equal second-highest career-peak "dissatisfied" rating, with 68% (6-8 February 2015 and 20-22 February 2015).

Highest "Better Prime Minister" score[edit]

Until mid-1991, "Better Prime Minister" ratings were only surveyed during election campaigns.

Kevin Rudd has the highest "Better Prime Minister" score with 73% (28 Feb-2 Mar 2008 and 4–6 April 2008).
John Howard has the second-highest career-peak "Better Prime Minister" score with 67% (20–22 June 2003).
Bob Hawke has the third-highest career-peak "Better Prime Minister" score with 62% (5–7 June 1987 and 16–21 June 1987).

Lowest "Better Prime Minister" score[edit]

Paul Keating has the lowest "Better Prime Minister" score with 27% (20–22 August 1993).
Tony Abbott has the second-lowest career-low "Better Prime Minister" score with 30% (6-8 February 2015).
John Howard has the third-lowest career-low "Better Prime Minister" score with 31% (24–6 July 1998).

Opposition Leader polling[edit]

Highest approval rating[edit]

Kevin Rudd has had the highest recorded approval rating, of 68% (16–18 February 2007 and 11–13 May 2007).
Mark Latham has the second-highest career-peak approval rating, of 66% (19–21 March 2004).
John Hewson has the third-highest career-peak approval rating, of 55% (17–19 January 1992).

Lowest approval rating[edit]

Alexander Downer recorded the lowest approval rating, of 20% (2–4 December 1994 and 16–18 December 1994).
Three leaders have recorded career-low approval ratings of 22%. They are Andrew Peacock (19–21 May 1989), John Hewson (11–13 March 1994) and Simon Crean (28–30 November 2003).

Highest dissatisfaction rating[edit]

Alexander Downer recorded the highest dissatisfaction rating, of 69% (2–4 December 1994).
Andrew Peacock recorded the second-highest career-high dissatisfaction rating, of 67% (16–18 March 1990).
John Hewson recorded the third-highest career-high dissatisfaction rating, of 64% (11–13 March 1994).

Highest "Better Prime Minister" score[edit]

Kevin Rudd holds the record with 50% (19–21 October 2007).
Alexander Downer recorded the second-highest career-peak score, of 48% (8–10 July 1994).
Bill Shorten recorded the equal second-highest career-peak score, of 48% (6-8 February 2015).

Lowest "Better Prime Minister" score[edit]

Brendan Nelson holds the record with 7% (29 February-2 March 2008).
Simon Crean recorded the second-lowest career-low score, with 14% (28–30 November 2003).
Malcolm Turnbull recorded the equal-second lowest, with 14% (27–29 November 2009).

See also[edit]

External links[edit]