Alison H. Clarkson

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Alison H. Clarkson
AlisonClarkson.png
Majority Leader of the Vermont Senate
Assumed office
January 6, 2021
Preceded byBecca Balint
Member of the Vermont Senate
from the Windsor district
Assumed office
January 4, 2017
Preceded byJohn F. Campbell
Member of the Vermont House of Representatives
from the Windsor 5th district
In office
January 5, 2005 – January 4, 2017
Preceded byJack Anderson
Succeeded byCharles Kimbell
Personal details
Born
Alison Hudnut Clarkson

(1955-04-26) April 26, 1955 (age 67)
Buffalo, New York, U.S.
Political partyDemocratic
SpouseOliver Ramsdell Goodenough
Children2
EducationHarvard University (BA)

Alison Hudnut Clarkson (born April 26, 1955) is an American theatrical producer and politician. She has been the majority leader of the Vermont Senate since 2021, representing the Windsor district as a member of the Democratic Party. Before entering the state senate, she served in the Vermont House of Representatives from the Windsor 5th district from 2005 to 2017.

Clarkson was born in Buffalo, New York, and educated at The Park School of Buffalo and Harvard University. She worked as a theatrical producer for productions which included The Potsdam Quartet and A. R. Gurney's The Middle Ages and served on the New York Theatre Workshop's board of directors.

She was elected to the state house in the 2004 election after Representative Jack Anderson retired. She continued to serve in the state house until her election to the state senate in the 2016 election following the retirement of Senator John F. Campbell. Clarkson was selected to replace Becca Balint as Majority Leader in the state senate in 2020.

Early life and education[edit]

Alison Hudnut Clarkson was born in Buffalo, New York, on April 26, 1955, to William Melbourne Elliott Clarkson, who later served as the Executive Deputy Commissioner of Commerce of the State of New York. She graduated from The Park School of Buffalo, which she later served on its board of trustees, and from Harvard University, attending Radcliffe College, with a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1977. Clarkson married Oliver Ramsdell Goodenough, with whom she had two children, on January 12, 1985, and moved to Vermont in 1992.[1][2][3]

Clarkson was a theatrical producer and served on the board of directors for the New York Theatre Workshop and Vermont Arts Council board of trustees; the first production she managed was The Potsdam Quartet in 1982, and she produced A. R. Gurney's The Middle Ages in 1983.[1][4][5][6]

Career[edit]

Vermont House of Representatives[edit]

Jack Anderson, an independent member of the Vermont House of Representatives, retired during the 2004 election.[7] She won the Democratic nomination and defeated Republican nominee Preston J. Bristow Jr. in the general election.[8][9] She won reelection in the 2006,[10][11] 2010,[12][13] 2012, and 2014 elections without opposition.[14][15][16][17] She defeated Republican nominee Geoffrey Peterson, whose name had appeared on the ballot despite him dropping out and who announced in October that he was not in the race, in the 2008 election.[18][19][20]

During her tenure in the state house she served on the Judicial Retention committee. She served as the clerk of the Ways and Means committee, and vice-chair and chair of the Legislative Council.[21][22]

Vermont Senate[edit]

John F. Campbell, the President pro tempore of the Vermont Senate, retired during the 2016 election. Clarkson announced her campaign for a seat in the Vermont Senate on April 25, 2016, at a rally attended by Rebecca White, Gabrielle Lucke, and Ernie Shand. She won the Democratic nomination alongside Alice Nitka and Richard McCormack despite Campbell having endorsed Conor Kennedy in the primary and she placed first out of seven candidates in the general election.[23][24][25][26] She placed first out of all candidates in the 2018 and 2020 elections.[27][28][29][30]

During her tenure in the state senate she served on the Judicial Rules, Joint Rules, and Rules committees. She served as the clerk of the Government Operations committee, and vice-chair of the Economic Development, Housing and General Affairs.[31][32] The Democratic caucus voted unanimously in 2020, to have Clarkson succeed Becca Balint as the Majority Leader after Senator Brian Campion dropped out of contention.[33][34]

Political positions[edit]

In 2007, the state house voted 82 to 63, with Clarkson voting in favor, against legislation to allow doctors to perform assisted suicide on terminally ill patients.[35] The state house voted 95 to 52, with Clarkson in favor, in favor of legalizing same-sex marriage in 2009, and she later voted in favor of the successful overturning of Governor Jim Douglas' veto of the legislation.[36][37] The Vermont Conservation Voters gave her a lifetime score of 96%.[38] Clarkson and Senator McCormack sponsored legislation in 2017, which created a day in honor of abolitionist John Brown, following the white supremacist Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.[39]

Electoral history[edit]

Alison H. Clarkson electoral history
2004 Vermont House of Representatives Windsor 5th district Democratic primary[8]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Alison H. Clarkson 280 99.64%
Democratic Write-ins 1 0.36%
Total votes 281 100.00%
2004 Vermont House of Representatives Windsor 5th district election[9]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Alison H. Clarkson 1,500 63.24%
Republican Preston J. Bristow Jr. 871 36.72%
Independent Write-ins 1 0.04%
Total votes 2,372 100.00%
2006 Vermont House of Representatives Windsor 5th district Democratic primary[10]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Alison H. Clarkson (incumbent) 491 99.80%
Democratic Write-ins 1 0.20%
Total votes 492 100.00%
2006 Vermont House of Representatives Windsor 5th district election[11]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Alison H. Clarkson (incumbent) 1,678 89.92%
Independent Write-ins 188 10.08%
Total votes 1,866 100.00%
2008 Vermont House of Representatives Windsor 5th district Democratic primary[19]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Alison H. Clarkson (incumbent) 189 98.95%
Democratic Write-ins 2 1.05%
Total votes 191 100.00%
2008 Vermont House of Representatives Windsor 5th district election[20]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Alison H. Clarkson (incumbent) 1,899 80.95%
Republican Geoffrey Peterson 431 18.37%
Independent Write-ins 16 0.68%
Total votes 2,346 100.00%
2010 Vermont House of Representatives Windsor 5th district Democratic primary[12]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Alison H. Clarkson (incumbent) 682 99.27%
Democratic Write-ins 5 0.73%
Total votes 687 100.00%
Blank and spoiled 73
2010 Vermont House of Representatives Windsor 5th district election[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Alison H. Clarkson (incumbent) 1,575 97.46%
Independent Write-ins 41 2.54%
Total votes 1,616 100.00%
Blank and spoiled 273
2012 Vermont House of Representatives Windsor 5th district Democratic primary[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Alison H. Clarkson (incumbent) 305 100.00%
Total votes 305 100.00%
Blank and spoiled 42
2012 Vermont House of Representatives Windsor 5th district election[15]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Alison H. Clarkson (incumbent) 2,247 98.77%
Independent Write-ins 28 1.23%
Total votes 2,275 100.00%
Blank and spoiled 342
2014 Vermont House of Representatives Windsor 5th district Democratic primary[16]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Alison H. Clarkson (incumbent) 107 98.17%
Democratic Write-ins 2 1.83%
Total votes 109 100.00%
Blank and spoiled 15
2014 Vermont House of Representatives Windsor 5th district election[17]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Alison H. Clarkson (incumbent) 1,320 100.00%
Total votes 1,320 100.00%
2016 Vermont Senate Windsor district Democratic primary[25]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Richard McCormack (incumbent) 5,381 28.68%
Democratic Alison H. Clarkson 5,145 27.43%
Democratic Alice Nitka (incumbent) 4,448 23.71%
Democratic Conor Kennedy 3,720 19.83%
Democratic Write-ins 65 0.35%
Total votes 18,759 100.00%
Blank and spoiled 7,731
2016 Vermont Senate Windsor district election[26]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Alison H. Clarkson 15,436 20.72%
Democratic Alice Nitka (incumbent) 14,430 19.37%
Progressive Richard McCormack (incumbent)
Democratic Richard McCormack (incumbent)
Total Richard McCormack (incumbent) 13,905 18.66%
Republican Mark Donka 9,836 13.20%
Republican Randy A. Gray 8,148 10.94%
Republican Jack Williams 7,460 10.01%
Independent Scott D. Woodward 5,198 6.98%
Independent Write-ins 87 0.12%
Total votes 74,500 100.00%
Blank and spoiled 21,764
2018 Vermont Senate Windsor district Democratic primary[27]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Alison H. Clarkson (incumbent) 4,699 33.72%
Democratic Richard McCormack (incumbent) 4,621 33.16%
Democratic Alice Nitka (incumbent) 4,511 32.37%
Democratic Write-ins 103 0.74%
Total votes 13,934 100.00%
Blank and spoiled 5,440
2018 Vermont Senate Windsor district election[28]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Alison H. Clarkson 15,091 23.03%
Democratic Alice Nitka (incumbent) 14,276 21.78%
Progressive Richard McCormack (incumbent)
Democratic Richard McCormack (incumbent)
Total Richard McCormack (incumbent) 13,591 20.74%
Republican Randy A. Gray 7,183 10.96%
Republican Wayne D. Townsend 6,882 10.50%
Republican Jack Williams 6,389 9.75%
Independent Mason Wade 2,055 3.14%
Independent Write-ins 65 0.10%
Total votes 65,532 100.00%
Blank and spoiled 15,537
2020 Vermont Senate Windsor district Democratic primary[29]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Alison H. Clarkson (incumbent) 8,164 33.69%
Democratic Richard McCormack (incumbent) 8,030 33.13%
Democratic Alice Nitka (incumbent) 7,883 32.53%
Democratic Write-ins 158 0.65%
Total votes 24,235 100.00%
Blank and spoiled 8,471
2020 Vermont Senate Windsor district election[30]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Alison H. Clarkson 19,084 23.33%
Democratic Richard McCormack (incumbent) 17,477 21.36%
Democratic Alice Nitka (incumbent)
Republican Alice Nitka (incumbent)
Total Alice Nitka (incumbent) 16,726 20.45%
Republican Jack Williams 9,702 11.86%
Republican Michael Jasinski Sr. 9,632 11.77%
Independent Keith Stern 4,605 5.63%
Independent Doug Wilberding 2,855 3.49%
Independent Mason Wade 1,471 1.80%
Independent Write-ins 251 0.31%
Total votes 81,803 100.00%
Blank and spoiled 28,285

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Alison H. Clarkson". Vermont Digger. Archived from the original on December 22, 2021. Retrieved December 23, 2021.
  2. ^ "Clarkson-Goodenough engagement". The Post-Star. October 4, 1984. p. 6. Archived from the original on December 22, 2021. Retrieved December 23, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  3. ^ "Clarkson-Goodenough Wedding". The Post-Star. January 14, 1985. p. 7. Archived from the original on December 22, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  4. ^ "Strings attached". New York Daily News. February 5, 1982. p. 99. Archived from the original on December 22, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  5. ^ "A. R. Gurney". New York Daily News. February 16, 1983. p. 8. Archived from the original on December 22, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  6. ^ "Arts Council honors Malcolm Wright, Louis Moyse". Brattleboro Reformer. July 10, 2003. p. 23. Archived from the original on December 22, 2021. Retrieved December 23, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  7. ^ "Windsor: Challengers file for races". Rutland Herald. July 20, 2004. p. 9. Archived from the original on December 22, 2021. Retrieved December 23, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  8. ^ a b "2004 State Representative Democratic Primary". Secretary of State of Vermont. Archived from the original on December 23, 2021. Retrieved December 23, 2021.
  9. ^ a b "2004 State Representative General Election". Secretary of State of Vermont. Archived from the original on December 23, 2021. Retrieved December 23, 2021.
  10. ^ a b "2006 State Representative Democratic Primary". Secretary of State of Vermont. Archived from the original on December 23, 2021. Retrieved December 23, 2021.
  11. ^ a b "2006 State Representative General Election". Secretary of State of Vermont. Archived from the original on December 23, 2021. Retrieved December 23, 2021.
  12. ^ a b "2010 State Representative Democratic Primary". Secretary of State of Vermont. Archived from the original on December 23, 2021.
  13. ^ a b "2010 State Representative General Election". Secretary of State of Vermont. Archived from the original on December 23, 2021. Retrieved December 23, 2021.
  14. ^ a b "2012 State Representative Democratic Primary". Secretary of State of Vermont. Archived from the original on December 23, 2021. Retrieved December 23, 2021.
  15. ^ a b "2012 State Representative General Election". Secretary of State of Vermont. Archived from the original on December 23, 2021.
  16. ^ a b "2014 State Representative Democratic Primary". Secretary of State of Vermont. Archived from the original on December 23, 2021. Retrieved December 23, 2021.
  17. ^ a b "2014 State Representative General Election". Secretary of State of Vermont. Archived from the original on December 23, 2021.
  18. ^ "Candidacy 'a mix-up' says Woodstock man". Rutland Herald. October 21, 2008. p. 9. Archived from the original on December 22, 2021. Retrieved December 23, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  19. ^ a b "2008 State Representative Democratic Primary". Secretary of State of Vermont. Archived from the original on December 23, 2021. Retrieved December 23, 2021.
  20. ^ a b "2008 State Representative General Election". Secretary of State of Vermont. Archived from the original on December 23, 2021. Retrieved December 23, 2021.
  21. ^ "Representative Alison H. Clarkson 2009-2010 Session". Vermont General Assembly. Archived from the original on December 22, 2021. Retrieved December 23, 2021.
  22. ^ "Representative Alison H. Clarkson 2011-2012 Session". Vermont General Assembly. Archived from the original on December 22, 2021.
  23. ^ "Primary". The Burlington Free Press. August 11, 2016. p. A8. Archived from the original on December 22, 2021. Retrieved December 23, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  24. ^ "Woodstock Rep. Seeks Vermont Senate Seat". Valley News. April 26, 2016. Archived from the original on December 23, 2021. Retrieved January 21, 2019.
  25. ^ a b "2016 State Senator Democratic Primary". Secretary of State of Vermont. Archived from the original on December 21, 2021. Retrieved December 23, 2021.
  26. ^ a b "2016 State Senator General Election". Secretary of State of Vermont. Archived from the original on December 22, 2021. Retrieved December 23, 2021.
  27. ^ a b "2018 State Senator Democratic Primary". Secretary of State of Vermont. Archived from the original on December 23, 2021.
  28. ^ a b "2018 State Senator General Election". Secretary of State of Vermont. Archived from the original on December 23, 2021. Retrieved December 23, 2021.
  29. ^ a b "2020 State Senator Democratic Primary". Secretary of State of Vermont. Archived from the original on December 23, 2021. Retrieved December 23, 2021.
  30. ^ a b "2020 State Senator General Election". Secretary of State of Vermont. Archived from the original on December 23, 2021.
  31. ^ "Senator Alison Clarkson 2017-2018 Session". Vermont General Assembly. Archived from the original on December 22, 2021.
  32. ^ "Senator Alison Clarkson 2021 Special Session". Vermont General Assembly. Archived from the original on December 22, 2021. Retrieved December 23, 2021.
  33. ^ "In Coming Session, Women Will Dominate Vermont Senate Leadership". Seven Days. November 22, 2020. Archived from the original on December 23, 2021. Retrieved December 23, 2021.
  34. ^ "Senate Democrats nominate Balint as first woman and openly gay pro tem". Vermont Digger. November 22, 2020. Archived from the original on December 23, 2021. Retrieved December 23, 2021.
  35. ^ "How they voted: House roll call". The Burlington Free Press. March 22, 2007. p. 4. Archived from the original on December 22, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  36. ^ "Same-sex marriage roll call". The Burlington Free Press. April 3, 2009. p. 5. Archived from the original on December 22, 2021. Retrieved December 23, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  37. ^ "House vote on veto override". The Burlington Free Press. April 8, 2009. p. 5. Archived from the original on June 18, 2021. Retrieved December 23, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  38. ^ "Alison Clarkson Legislative Scorecard". Vermont Conservation Voters. Archived from the original on December 23, 2021. Retrieved December 23, 2021.
  39. ^ "Vermont to Honor Abolitionist Brown". Valley News. October 18, 2017. Archived from the original on December 23, 2021.
Vermont Senate
Preceded by Majority Leader of the Vermont Senate
2021–present
Incumbent