1047

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1047 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar1047
MXLVII
Ab urbe condita1800
Armenian calendar496
ԹՎ ՆՂԶ
Assyrian calendar5797
Balinese saka calendar968–969
Bengali calendar454
Berber calendar1997
English Regnal yearN/A
Buddhist calendar1591
Burmese calendar409
Byzantine calendar6555–6556
Chinese calendar丙戌(Fire Dog)
3743 or 3683
    — to —
丁亥年 (Fire Pig)
3744 or 3684
Coptic calendar763–764
Discordian calendar2213
Ethiopian calendar1039–1040
Hebrew calendar4807–4808
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat1103–1104
 - Shaka Samvat968–969
 - Kali Yuga4147–4148
Holocene calendar11047
Igbo calendar47–48
Iranian calendar425–426
Islamic calendar438–439
Japanese calendarEishō 2
(永承2年)
Javanese calendar950–951
Julian calendar1047
MXLVII
Korean calendar3380
Minguo calendar865 before ROC
民前865年
Nanakshahi calendar−421
Seleucid era1358/1359 AG
Thai solar calendar1589–1590
Tibetan calendar阳火狗年
(male Fire-Dog)
1173 or 792 or 20
    — to —
阴火猪年
(female Fire-Pig)
1174 or 793 or 21
Map of the Battle of Val-ès-Dunes (1047)

Year 1047 (MXLVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Events[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]

  • September 2528 – Rebel general Leo Tornikios (a nephew of Emperor Constantine IX) proclaimes himself emperor at Adrianople and besieges Constantinople. Byzantine troops personally led by Constantine repel him and re-occupy the walls. Tornikios is forced to withdraw, while his followers start to abandon him. Finally, he is captured at a church in Boulgarophygon (modern Turkey) and is publicly blinded.[1]
  • Winter – Constantine IX allows the Pecheneg tribes to cross the Danube River and to settle permanently in Byzantine territory. He buys their alliance with presents, using them to attack his enemies – Bulgars and Magyars – in the rear and so to prevent any southward advance of the Kievan Rus'.[2]

Europe[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kazhdan, Alexander (1991). The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium, p. 2097. New York: Oxford University Press.
  2. ^ John Julius Norwich (2011). Byzantium: The Apogee, pp. 314–315. ISBN 0-394-53779-3.
  3. ^ Raoul Manselli (1960). "Altavilla, Drogone". Dizionario Biografico degli Italiani, vol. 2. Alberto Ghisalberti (ed.)
  4. ^ David C. Douglas (1999). William the Conqueror, p. 1026. (Yale University Press).