1232

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1232 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar1232
MCCXXXII
Ab urbe condita1985
Armenian calendar681
ԹՎ ՈՁԱ
Assyrian calendar5982
Balinese saka calendar1153–1154
Bengali calendar639
Berber calendar2182
English Regnal year16 Hen. 3 – 17 Hen. 3
Buddhist calendar1776
Burmese calendar594
Byzantine calendar6740–6741
Chinese calendar辛卯(Metal Rabbit)
3928 or 3868
    — to —
壬辰年 (Water Dragon)
3929 or 3869
Coptic calendar948–949
Discordian calendar2398
Ethiopian calendar1224–1225
Hebrew calendar4992–4993
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat1288–1289
 - Shaka Samvat1153–1154
 - Kali Yuga4332–4333
Holocene calendar11232
Igbo calendar232–233
Iranian calendar610–611
Islamic calendar629–630
Japanese calendarKangi 4 / Jōei 1
(貞永元年)
Javanese calendar1141–1142
Julian calendar1232
MCCXXXII
Korean calendar3565
Minguo calendar680 before ROC
民前680年
Nanakshahi calendar−236
Thai solar calendar1774–1775
Tibetan calendar阴金兔年
(female Iron-Rabbit)
1358 or 977 or 205
    — to —
阳水龙年
(male Water-Dragon)
1359 or 978 or 206

Year 1232 (MCCXXXII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Events[edit]

By area[edit]

Africa[edit]

  • The Almohad army besieges Ceuta, where Abu Musa, the rebellious brother of the caliph, has received shelter and the support of the population. The Genoese rent a part of their fleet to the rebels, who successfully resist the forces of the caliph.[1] The consequences of this revolt are threefold: the city becomes de facto independent from the Almohads, but its reliance on the Italian maritime powers increases, and the trans-Saharan trade routes begin to shift eastward, due to the local turmoil.

Asia[edit]

Europe[edit]

By topic[edit]

Markets[edit]

Religion[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Picard, Christophe (1997). La mer et les musulmans d'Occident VIIIe-XIIIe siècle. Paris: Presses Universitaires de France.
  2. ^ Peter Linehan (1999). "Chapter 21: Castile, Portugal and Navarre". In David Abulafia. The New Cambridge Medieval History c.1198-c.1300. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 668–673. ISBN 0-521-36289-X.
  3. ^ Zuijderduijn, Jaco (2009). Medieval Capital Markets. Markets for renten, state formation and private investment in Holland (1300-1550). Leiden/Boston: Brill. ISBN 978-9-00417565-5.
  4. ^ Dal-Gal, Niccolò (1907). "St. Anthony of Padua". The Catholic Encyclopedia. 1. Robert Appleton Company. Retrieved 2011-06-13.