2004 U.S. Open (golf)

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2004 U.S. Open
2004OpenLogo-1-.png
Tournament information
DatesJune 17–20, 2004
LocationShinnecock Hills, New York
Course(s)Shinnecock Hills Golf Club
Organized byUSGA
Tour(s)PGA Tour
European Tour
Japan Golf Tour
Statistics
Par70
Length6,996 yards (6,397 m)
Field156 players, 66 after cut
Cut146 (+6)
Prize fund$6,250,000
5,203,577
Winner's share$1,125,000
€936,644[1]
Champion
South Africa Retief Goosen
276 (−4)
← 2003
2005 →
Shinnecock Hills  is located in the US
Shinnecock Hills 
Shinnecock Hills 
Location in the United States
Shinnecock Hills  is located in New York
Shinnecock Hills 
Shinnecock Hills 
Location in New York

The 2004 United States Open Championship was the 104th U.S. Open, held June 17–20 at Shinnecock Hills Golf Club in Shinnecock Hills, New York. Retief Goosen won his second U.S. Open title, two strokes ahead of runner-up Phil Mickelson, the reigning Masters champion.[2][3][4][5] The purse was $6.25 million with a winner's share of $1.125 million.[6]

Late on Sunday in dry and breezy conditions, Goosen birdied the 16th hole and Mickelson double-bogeyed the par-3 17th.[7] Goosen's previous U.S. Open win was in 2001 in a playoff at Southern Hills.

History of U.S. Open at Shinnecock Hills[edit]

This was the fourth U.S. Open hosted by Shinnecock Hills. The former champions were James Foulis (1896), Raymond Floyd (1986), and Corey Pavin (1995). The second U.S. Open was held at Shinnecock in 1896, but ninety years went by before it hosted again. The 1986 edition was held on a completely revamped course. Floyd, age 43, entered the final round three shots behind and shot a 66 in difficult scoring conditions to win his fourth major.

The conditions were similar in 1995, with no one under par. Pavin played the final ten holes in three-under-par on the way to a 68 and the win. He hit a memorable 4-wood to the 72nd green to within 5 feet (1.5 m) and finished at even par 280.

Course layout[edit]

Hole Yards Par    Hole Yards Par
1 393 4 10 412 4
2 226 3 11 158 3
3 478 4 12 468 4
4 435 4 13 370 4
5 537 5 14 443 4
6 474 4 15 403 4
7 189 3 16 540 5
8 398 4 17 179 3
9 443 4 18 450 4
Out 3,573 35 In 3,423 35
Source:[4][8][9] Total 6,996 70

Lengths of the course for previous major championships:

Field[edit]

1. Last 10 U.S. Open Champions

Ernie Els (4,8,9,10,11,13,16), Jim Furyk (8,9,16), Retief Goosen (9,10,16), Lee Janzen, Corey Pavin, Tiger Woods (3,4,5,9,11,12,16)

2. Top two finishers in the 2003 U.S. Amateur

Nick Flanagan (a), Casey Wittenberg (a)

3. Last five Masters Champions

Phil Mickelson (11,16), Vijay Singh (9,11,12,16), Mike Weir (8,9,16)

4. Last five British Open Champions

Ben Curtis (16), David Duval, Paul Lawrie

5. Last five PGA Champions

Rich Beem, Shaun Micheel (16), David Toms (8,9,12,16)

6. The Players Champion

Adam Scott (10,11,12,16)

7. The U.S. Senior Open Champion
8. Top 15 finishers and ties in the 2003 U.S. Open

Jonathan Byrd, Tom Byrum, Pádraig Harrington (10,16), Fredrik Jacobson (10,16), Jonathan Kaye (9,12,16), Cliff Kresge, Stephen Leaney (10,16), Billy Mayfair, Kenny Perry (9,12,16), Tim Petrovic, Nick Price (9,16), Eduardo Romero, Justin Rose, Hidemichi Tanaka, Scott Verplank (9,16)

9. Top 30 leaders on the 2003 PGA Tour official money list

Robert Allenby (16), Stuart Appleby (11,16), Briny Baird, Chad Campbell (11,16), K. J. Choi (16), Chris DiMarco (16), Brad Faxon (16), Steve Flesch (11,12,16), Fred Funk, Jay Haas (16), Tim Herron, Charles Howell III (16), Jerry Kelly (16), Justin Leonard (16), J. L. Lewis, Davis Love III (11,16), Chris Riley (16), Kirk Triplett (16), Bob Tway (16)

10. Top 15 on the 2003 European Tour Order of Merit

Thomas Bjørn (16), Michael Campbell, Paul Casey (16), Darren Clarke (13,16), Brian Davis, Trevor Immelman (16), Ian Poulter, Phillip Price, Lee Westwood

11. Top 10 on the PGA Tour official money list, as of May 30

Stewart Cink (16)

12. Winners of multiple PGA Tour events from April 23, 2003 through the 2004 Memorial Tournament
13. Top 2 from the 2004 European Tour Order of Merit, as of May 31
14. Top 2 on the 2003 Japan Golf Tour, provided they are within the top 75 point leaders of the Official World Golf Rankings at that time

Toshimitsu Izawa

15. Top 2 on the 2003 PGA Tour of Australasia, provided they are within the top 75 point leaders of the Official World Golf Rankings at that time

Peter Lonard (16)

16. Top 50 on the Official World Golf Rankings list, as of May 31

Stephen Ames, Ángel Cabrera, Fred Couples, Sergio García, Todd Hamilton, Joakim Haeggman, Scott Hoch, Miguel Ángel Jiménez, Zach Johnson, Shigeki Maruyama, Craig Parry

17. Special exemptions selected by the USGA

Raymond Floyd

Sectional qualifiers

Past champions in the field[edit]

Made the cut[edit]

Player Country Year(s) won R1 R2 R3 R4 Total To par Finish
Retief Goosen  South Africa 2001 70 66 69 71 276 −4 1
Ernie Els  South Africa 1994, 1997 70 67 70 80 287 +7 T9
Tiger Woods  United States 2000, 2002 72 69 73 76 290 +10 T17
Corey Pavin  United States 1995 67 71 73 79 290 +10 T17
Lee Janzen  United States 1993, 1998 72 70 71 79 292 +12 T24
Jim Furyk  United States 2003 72 72 75 79 298 +18 T48
Tom Kite  United States 1992 72 71 75 84 302 +22 T57

Source:[10][11]

Missed the cut[edit]

Player Country Year won R1 R2 Total To par
Raymond Floyd  United States 1986 75 75 150 +10

Source:[8]

Round summaries[edit]

First round[edit]

Thursday, June 17, 2004

Fifty-year-old Jay Haas led after one round, in a bid to become the oldest major champion in history. He was joined at the lead by Shigeki Maruyama and Ángel Cabrera.[12] Two-time major champion Vijay Singh shot a solid 68, as did current Masters champion Phil Mickelson. Former U.S. Open champions Ernie Els and Retief Goosen shot an even-par 70 after rough starts. World Number 1 Tiger Woods struggled on Shinnecock's fast conditions and settled for a two-over-par 72. David Duval shot an 83, the worst round in the field, but was in high spirits afterwards.

Place Player Country Score To par
T1 Ángel Cabrera  Argentina 66 −4
Jay Haas  United States
Shigeki Maruyama  Japan
4 Corey Pavin  United States 67 −3
T5 Kris Cox  United States 68 −2
Ben Curtis  United States
Steve Flesch  United States
Skip Kendall  United States
Jeff Maggert  United States
Phil Mickelson  United States
David Roesch  United States
Vijay Singh  Fiji
Kevin Stadler  United States

Source:[12]

Second round[edit]

Friday, June 18, 2004

Phil Mickelson surged into the lead, trying to become the sixth to win the first two majors of the year, with a bogey-free 66.[13] He tied for the lead with Shigeki Maruyama, who bogeyed the 18th hole and shot 68. Ernie Els had four consecutive birdies in a round of 67. Jeff Maggert was in solo third at five-under-par with a 67, while Fred Funk and Retief Goosen both shot 66 to tie for fourth. Ángel Cabrera had a crazy day after a 66 to shoot a 71. Corey Pavin, the previous champion at Shinnecock in 1995, tied with Vijay Singh at four strokes back. Tiger Woods shot 69 for 141 (+1), tied for 18th. World Number 4 Davis Love III missed the cut, as did David Duval.[13]

Jay Haas (E) and amateur Bill Haas (+5) were the second father and son to make the cut in the same U.S. Open; it was first accomplished 46 years earlier in 1948 by Joe Kirkwood, Sr. and Joe Kirkwood, Jr.

Place Player Country Score To par
T1 Shigeki Maruyama  Japan 66-68=134 −6
Phil Mickelson  United States 68-66=134
3 Jeff Maggert  United States 68-67=135 −5
T4 Fred Funk  United States 70-66=136 −4
Retief Goosen  South Africa 70-66=136
T6 Ángel Cabrera  Argentina 66-71=137 −3
Ernie Els  South Africa 70-67=137
T8 Corey Pavin  United States 67-71=138 −2
Vijay Singh  Fiji 68-70=138
T10 Trevor Immelman  South Africa 69-70=139 −1
Mike Weir  Canada 69-70=139
Amateurs: Levin (+2), Wittenberg (+2), Haas (+5), Reavie (+5),
                 Mackenzie (+9), Smith (+9), Flanagan (+14), Álvarez (+18)

Source:[8][13]

Third round[edit]

Saturday, June 19, 2004

Retief Goosen battled his way into a two-shot lead on Saturday as Shinnecock Hills presented its stiffest test of the week. He held his nerve in challenging conditions to card a one-under 69 for 205 (−5), and was one of only three to break par.[14] Second round leader Phil Mickelson bogeyed the last two holes for a share of second place with two-time champion Ernie Els. Fred Funk and Shigeki Maruyama both had crazy days, finishing poorly for a tie for fourth. Jeff Maggert's 74 dropped him into a tie for sixth with Tim Clark, who had 66, the best of the day; Tiger Woods eagled the 18th for 73 and Vijay Singh stumbled with a 77.[15]

Place Player Country Score To par
1 Retief Goosen  South Africa 70-66-69=205 −5
T2 Ernie Els  South Africa 70-67-70=207 −3
Phil Mickelson  United States 68-66-73=207
T4 Fred Funk  United States 70-66-72=208 −2
Shigeki Maruyama  Japan 66-68-74=208
T6 Tim Clark  South Africa 73-70-66=209 −1
Jeff Maggert  United States 68-67-74=209
8 Mike Weir  Canada 69-70-71=210 E
T9 Sergio García  Spain 72-68-71=211 +1
Corey Pavin  United States 67-71-73=211

Source:[14][16]

Final round[edit]

Sunday, June 20, 2004

Retief Goosen held his nerve and won his second U.S. Open, edging out Phil Mickelson by two shots with a closing 71 (+1) on Sunday to finish at four-under 276. Conditions were brutal on the final day when the average final-round score was 78.7 and no one was under par.[17][18] Mickelson, urged on by raucous New York galleries on a windswept sunny afternoon, completed a matching 71 for his third runner-up spot in the last six U.S. Opens. Goosen led by two going into the final day, but was overtaken by Mickelson in the closing stretch, with back-to-back birdies on 15 and 16. But Mickelson, bidding to become the sixth player to win the first two majors of the year, immediately fell back with a double-bogey at the par-three 17th, three-putting from five feet (1.5 m). In the final pair with compatriot Ernie Els,[16] Goosen restored his two-shot advantage with a twelve-foot (3.7 m) birdie putt on 16 and parred the final two holes to seal the title.[3]

In a nearly unprecedented action, the USGA needed to water a few of the greens during play including the 7th green when players were not able to prevent the ball from rolling off.[18]

Jeff Maggert (72) finished third at one-over 281, while 2003 Masters champion Mike Weir (74) and Shigeki Maruyama (76) were three shots further back at 284 in a tie for fourth. World number two Els, joint second overnight with Mickelson, produced four double-bogeys on his way to an 80 (+10), his worst score in a U.S. Open, and tied for ninth at 287. Top-ranked Tiger Woods, who began nine shots off the lead,[15] battled to a 76 and a share of 17th place. A mix of five bogeys, a double-bogey and a birdie at the last left him at 290 (+10) as he narrowly avoided his worst round at a U.S. Open.[2] His career high of 77 came as an amateur in 1996, in the third round at Oakland Hills. Robert Allenby had the low round of the day at even-par 70; three birdies and three bogeys lifted him into a tie for seventh with Steve Flesch at six-over 286; Fred Funk (77) was alone in sixth on 285.

Place Player Country Score To par Money ($)
1 Retief Goosen  South Africa 70-66-69-71=276 −4 1,125,000
2 Phil Mickelson  United States 68-66-73-71=278 −2 675,000
3 Jeff Maggert  United States 68-67-74-72=281 +1 424,604
T4 Shigeki Maruyama  Japan 66-68-74-76=284 +4 267,756
Mike Weir  Canada 69-70-71-74=284
6 Fred Funk  United States 70-66-72-77=285 +5 212,444
T7 Robert Allenby  Australia 70-72-74-70=286 +6 183,828
Steve Flesch  United States 68-74-70-74=286
T9 Stephen Ames  Canada 74-66-73-74=287 +7 145,282
Chris DiMarco  United States 71-71-70-75=287
Ernie Els  South Africa 70-67-70-80=287
Jay Haas  United States 66-74-76-71=287
Amateurs: Levin (+8), Wittenberg (+16), Haas (+17), Reavie (+24)

Source:[10][11][19]

Scorecard[edit]

Hole  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9  10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
Par 4 3 4 4 5 4 3 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 5 3 4
South Africa Goosen −6 −5 −5 −5 −5 −5 −5 −4 −4 −3 −4 −4 −4 −3 −3 −4 −4 −4
United States Mickelson −3 −3 −2 −3 −3 −3 −3 −3 −3 −2 −2 −1 −2 −2 −3 −4 −2 −2
United States Maggert −2 −1 −1 E −1 −1 −1 +1 E +1 +1 +1 E E +1 +1 E +1
Japan Maruyama −1 E E E −1 E +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +3 +4 +4
Canada Weir +1 +2 +3 +2 +2 +3 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +5 +4 +4 +4
United States Funk −2 −1 E E +1 +1 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +3 +3 +4 +4 +3 +4 +5
South Africa Els −1 −1 −2 −1 E E +1 +3 +3 +5 +4 +4 +5 +7 +7 +7 +7 +7

Cumulative tournament scores, relative to par

Birdie Bogey Double bogey

Source:[10][11][19][20]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "U.S. Open Championship: leaderboard". European Tour. June 20, 2004. Retrieved June 14, 2012.
  2. ^ a b Ferguson, Doug (June 21, 2004). "No Goose bumps". Sarasota Herald-Tribune. (Florida). Associated Press. p. 1C.
  3. ^ a b Brown, Clifton (June 21, 2004). "Mickelson bears major setback". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). (New York Times). p. E1.
  4. ^ a b D'Amato, Gary (June 21, 2004). "Golden Goose". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. p. 1C.
  5. ^ "U.S. Open history: 2004". USGA. Retrieved June 24, 2012.
  6. ^ Hamilton, Scott (June 21, 2004). "Golden Goosen". Star-News. (Wilmington, North Carolina). p. 1C.
  7. ^ Shipnuck, Alan (June 28, 2004). "Wild Goose Chase". Sports Illustrated. p. 54.
  8. ^ a b c "At the U.S. Open - Friday's scores". Star-News. (Wilmington, North Carolina). June 19, 2004. p. 6C.
  9. ^ "2004 U.S. Open". ESPN. June 20, 2004. Retrieved June 24, 2012.
  10. ^ a b c "Scoreboard". Star-News. (Wilmington, North Carolina). June 21, 2004. p. 6C.
  11. ^ a b c "104th United States Open - Sunday: Final scores". Sarasota Herald-Tribune. (Florida). June 21, 2004. p. 7C.
  12. ^ a b Ferguson, Doug (June 18, 2004). "Haas, Maruyama dodge storms". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). Associated Press. p. C1.
  13. ^ a b c Dufresne, Chris (June 19, 2004). "Masters magic hasn't worn off for Mickelson". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). (Los Angeles Times). p. D1.
  14. ^ a b Dufresne, Chris (June 20, 2004). "Goosen survives blustery third-round with two-shot edge". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). (Los Angeles Times). p. D1.
  15. ^ a b Newberry, Paul (June 20, 2004). "Woods gets ray of hope on frustrating day". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). Associated Press. p. D3.
  16. ^ a b "U.S. Open - third round scores". Star-News. (Wilmington, North Carolina). June 20, 2004. p. 6C.
  17. ^ "USGA under fire". Star-News. (Wilmington, North Carolina). (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel). June 21, 2004. p. 6C.
  18. ^ a b D'Amato, Gary (June 21, 2004). "Kelly blasts Open officials". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. p. 8C.
  19. ^ a b "2004 U.S. Open: leaderboard". Yahoo Sports. June 20, 2004. Retrieved June 14, 2012.
  20. ^ "2004 U.S. Open leaderboard". ESPN. June 20, 2004. Retrieved May 26, 2013.

External links[edit]

Preceded by
2004 Masters
Major Championships Succeeded by
2004 Open Championship

Coordinates: 40°53′38″N 72°26′24″W / 40.894°N 72.440°W / 40.894; -72.440