Alex English

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For the American political activist, see Pirate Party (United States).
Alex English
Alex English 1971 Dreher High School.JPG
English shooting the ball for the Dreher High School varsity basketball team in 1970-71.
Personal information
Born (1954-01-05) January 5, 1954 (age 61)
Columbia, South Carolina
Nationality American
Listed height 6 ft 7 in (2.01 m)
Listed weight 190 lb (86 kg)
Career information
High school Dreher (Columbia, South Carolina)
College South Carolina (1972–1976)
NBA draft 1976 / Round: 2 / Pick: 23rd overall
Selected by the Milwaukee Bucks
Pro career 1976–1992
Position Small forward
Number 23, 22, 2
Career history
19761978 Milwaukee Bucks
19781980 Indiana Pacers
1980–1990 Denver Nuggets
1990–1991 Dallas Mavericks
1991–1992 Basket Napoli (Italy)
Career highlights and awards
Career NBA statistics
Points 25,613 (21.5 ppg)
Rebounds 6,538 (5.5 rpg)
Assists 4,351 (3.6 apg)
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com
Basketball Hall of Fame as player

Alexander English (born January 5, 1954) is a retired American basketball player. He was most recently an assistant coach with the Sacramento Kings of the National Basketball Association (NBA). Born in Columbia, South Carolina, he played college basketball at the University of South Carolina. English played 16 seasons in the NBA for four different teams.

English averaged 21.5 points and 5.5 rebounds per game during his NBA career and was named to eight NBA All-Star teams. His #2 jersey was retired by the Denver Nuggets and he was elected to the Basketball Hall of Fame in 1997.

NBA career[edit]

Drafted by the Milwaukee Bucks in the 2nd round with the 23rd pick. Alex's time in Milwaukee was spent as a back-up on a rebuilding team that lost Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. However, it was not until he left as a free agent in 1978 for the Indiana Pacers, that he began his reputation as a scorer, averaging 16 points on an another sub-par team before being traded to Denver in mid way through the 1979-80 season for George McGinnis a former Pacers star from their ABA days and it turned out to be one of the most one-sided trades in NBA history; McGinnis was only a shadow of his former self, and was out of the league by 1982.

English then commenced a highly low-key assault on the NBA scoring books. With the erratic, high-paced, and high-scoring Nuggets he averaged 21 points when he arrived in Denver in 1980, then proceeded with averages of 24, 25, 28, 26, 28, nearly 30 (in 1985–86) season, 29, 25, 27, and 18 points per game during his decade-long scoring spree. That made him the highest-scoring player of the time, a period where the NBA gained national prominence; he never sought out the spotlight,he also led the Nuggets to nine consecutive playoffs, and for himself was awarded with three All-NBA Second Teams (1982, 1985, 1986), 8 All-Star appearances, set 31 team records in his decade in Denver, helped Denver win 2 Midwest Division titles and get to the 1985 Western Conference Finals, and was the leading scorer in 55% of the games he played in Denver.

English's NBA career ended when, with a short stint for he departed as a free agent in 1990, the Dallas Mavericks, where he once again played back-up, averaging almost 10 points a game. No other team signed him for the next season, and after a stint in Italy, English retired. The Nuggets retired his number in 1992. English retired as the Nuggets all-time leading scorer having notched 21, 654 points and his career average of 25. 9 ppg, these skills allowed him to place 17th on the NBA all-time scoring list as of 2015 with 25,613 points.[1] He was the first player ever to string together eight straight 2,000-point seasons. He has the distinction of being the top scorer in the 1980s.

After Basketball[edit]

From June 2004 to July 2011, English was the director of player development and an assistant coach for the Toronto Raptors. He joined the Raptors after spending the previous two season as an assistant coach with the Philadelphia 76ers and Atlanta Hawks. On June 5, 2009, it was announced that English would stay with the Raptors as an assistant coach. On July 13, 2011, with the team heading in a new direction, English was not given a new contract, and his services were not retained.

On January 13, 2012, he was added to the Sacramento Kings coaching staff under head coach Keith Smart. On June 5, 2013, new Kings coach Michael Malone announced that the 2012–13 assistant coaches would not be retained for the 2013–14 season.[2]

It was announced that Alex English was added as a color analyst on SEC Network on November 11, 2014.

Acting career[edit]

Alex English has dabbled in acting. His debut came in the 1987 motion picture Amazing Grace and Chuck, playing a fictitious Boston Celtics star. He has also had roles in the television series Midnight Caller 1989 and played the head coach of the Cleveland Cavaliers in Eddie (1996). To date, his last role was as "The Premiere" 1997's 'The Definite Maybe.

NBA career statistics[edit]

Regular season[edit]

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
1976–77 Milwaukee 60 6 10.8 .477 [a] .000 .767 2.8 .4 .3 .3 3.2
1977–78 Milwaukee 82 4 18.9 .542 .000 .727 4.8 1.6 .5 .7 9.6
1978–79 Milwaukee 81 69 33.3 .511 .000 .752 8.1 3.3 .9 1.0 16.0
1979–80 Indiana 54 15 28.3 .504 .000 .814 7.0 2.6 .8 .6 14.9
1979–80 Denver 24 24 36.5 .485 .667 .762 9.4 3.4 1.2 1.2 21.3
1980–81 Denver 81 81 38.2 .494 .600 .850 8.0 3.6 1.3 1.2 23.8
1981–82 Denver 82 82 36.8 .551 .000 .840 6.8 5.3 1.1 1.5 25.4
1982–83 Denver 82 82 36.4 .516 .167 .829 7.3 4.8 1.4 1.5 28.4
1983–84 Denver 82 77 35.0 .529 .143 .824 5.7 5.0 1.0 1.2 26.4
1984–85 Denver 81 81 36.1 .518 .200 .829 5.7 4.2 1.2 .6 27.9
1985–86 Denver 81 81 37.3 .504 .200 .862 5.0 4.0 .9 .4 29.8
1986–87 Denver 82 82 37.6 .503 .267 .844 4.2 5.1 .9 .3 28.6
1987–88 Denver 80 80 35.2 .495 .000 .828 4.7 4.7 .9 .3 25.0
1988–89 Denver 82 82 36.5 .491 .250 .858 4.0 4.7 .8 .1 26.5
1989–90 Denver 80 80 27.6 .491 .400 .880 3.6 2.8 .6 .3 17.9
1990–91 Dallas 79 26 22.1 .439 .000 .850 3.2 1.3 .5 .3 9.7
Career 1,193 753 31.9 .507 .217 .832 5.5 3.6 .9 .7 21.5
All-Star 8 4 18.5 .500 .000 .500 2.3 1.9 .8 .5 9.1
  • a The NBA adopted the three-point line in the 1979–80 season.

Playoffs[edit]

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
1978 Milwaukee 9 - 23.1 .615 .000 .781 4.7 1.4 .7 .8 13.4
1982 Denver 3 - 39.3 .473 .000 .857 7.7 5.7 1.0 1.0 19.3
1983 Denver 7 - 38.6 .447 .000 .887 6.3 6.0 .6 1.0 25.9
1984 Denver 5 - 40.6 .588 .000 .893 8.0 5.6 .6 .4 29.0
1985 Denver 14 14 38.3 .536 .000 .890 6.6 4.5 1.2 .4 30.2
1986 Denver 10 10 39.4 .463 .000 .859 3.5 5.2 .4 .4 27.3
1987 Denver 3 3 25.3 .510 .000 .857 4.7 3.3 .0 .0 18.7
1988 Denver 11 11 39.8 .455 .000 .814 5.4 4.4 .6 .3 24.3
1989 Denver 3 3 36.0 .516 .000 .875 4.3 3.7 .3 .0 26.0
1990 Denver 3 3 25.3 .568 .000 .818 3.0 3.0 .7 .3 19.7
Career 68 44 [a] 35.7 .503 .000 [b] .862 5.5 4.3 .7 .5 24.4
  • a Incomplete statistics.
  • b The NBA adopted the three-point line in the 1979–80 season.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]