Avon Lake, Ohio

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Avon Lake, Ohio
Avon Lake Public Library
Avon Lake Public Library
Location in Ohio
Location in Ohio
Location of Avon Lake in Lorain County
Location of Avon Lake in Lorain County
Avon Lake is located in Ohio
Avon Lake
Avon Lake
Location in Ohio
Avon Lake is located in the United States
Avon Lake
Avon Lake
Avon Lake (the United States)
Avon Lake is located in North America
Avon Lake
Avon Lake
Avon Lake (North America)
Coordinates: 41°30′6″N 82°0′23″W / 41.50167°N 82.00639°W / 41.50167; -82.00639Coordinates: 41°30′6″N 82°0′23″W / 41.50167°N 82.00639°W / 41.50167; -82.00639
CountryUnited States
StateOhio
CountyLorain
Avon on the lake1819
Avon Lake Township1912
Avon Lake City1960
Government
 • MayorGreg Zilka[1][2]
 • Council PresidentMarty O'Donnell [3]
 • Council-At-LargeZach Arnold [4]
 • Council-At-LargeKarl (KC) Zuber [5]
 • Ward I CouncilBillie Jo David [6]
Area
 • Total11.13 sq mi (28.83 km2)
 • Land11.13 sq mi (28.83 km2)
 • Water0.00 sq mi (0.00 km2)  0%
Elevation
600 ft (185 m)
Population
 • Total25,206
 • Density2,264.69/sq mi (892.88/km2)
Time zoneUTC-4 (EST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC-4 (EDT)
Zip code
44012
Area code(s)440
FIPS code39-03464[9]
GNIS feature ID1048474[10]
Websitehttps://www.avonlake.org/

Avon Lake is a city in Lorain County, Ohio, United States, located on Lake Erie 17 miles west of Cleveland. The population was 25,206 at the 2020 Census. It is part of the Cleveland-Elyria, OH Metropolitan Statistical Area.

History[edit]

Avon Lake was first settled in the 17th century and was, along with Avon, Bay Village, and Westlake, inhabited by Wyandots, Eries, Ottawas, etc. These people settled, traded, fought, made peace, and later moved elsewhere. Avon Lake, Avon, Bay Village, and Westlake were all one territory, Xeuma.[citation needed]

This area has so far been a part of three nations. Sometime prior to 1765, this territory was part of France. In 1765, the French were driven out by the English. Eighteen years later, in 1783, the English were forced out by the newly independent United States. During the Revolutionary War, a direct trail from the east to the west crossed the lake shore through what now includes Avon Lake. This trail is where Lake Road is today. It was used by the British more than by the colonists.[citation needed]

After a series of treaties, the area was purchased by the Connecticut Land Company in 1795 as the Western Reserve. Pierpont Eas formed, and the following settlers called the territory of present-day Avon Lake, Avon, Bay Village, and Westlake "Xeuma," a Native American term which means "those who came before us". French and English colonial forces did the same things here as the Natives.[citation needed]

Noah Davis, the first lakeshore dweller, arrived in 1812 and lived in a three-sided cabin near the present-day intersection of Lake and Moore Roads for about a year. Wilbur Cahoon, owner of the land, encountered Davis and moved farther south (on Davis' advice) in the French Creek precinct where it was not as marshy but more fitting for farming, in 1814.[citation needed]

In 1818, Cuyahoga County drew new boundaries, splitting Xeuma into two. The west part was Troy Township and the east part was Dover Township. Adam Miller and his family arrived in the following year, and the family has been here ever since. The Millers and others who followed mostly cleared land, sawed timber, and built ships in nearby Black River (eventually renamed Lorain), however Avon Lake's shorelines also had a number of sawmills and shipyards.[citation needed]

In 1822, Lorain County was formed. Troy Township was renamed "Avon Township" by petition in 1824.

European seamen first settled this place in the year 1812, and was originally part of the Avon Township, and also part of Cuyahoga County. Then in 1822, it became part of Lorain County. Then, in 1915, this part of Avon was separated from the rest of the Township of Avon to form the Township of Avon Lake. In 1960, Avon Lake was granted the status of a city.[citation needed]

Avon Lake became a qualified Tree City USA as recognized by the National Arbor Day Foundation in 1993.[14]

Geography[edit]

Avon Lake is located at 41°30′6″N 82°0′23″W / 41.50167°N 82.00639°W / 41.50167; -82.00639 (41.501595, -82.006309).[15]

According to the 2010 census, the city has a total area of 11.13 square miles (28.8 km2), all land.[16]

Avon Lake is located on Lake Erie.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1920904
19301,61078.1%
19402,27441.2%
19504,34290.9%
19609,403116.6%
197012,26130.4%
198013,1847.5%
199015,06614.3%
200018,14520.4%
201022,58124.4%
202025,20611.6%
2021 (est.)25,5881.5%
U.S. Decennial Census[17][18]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[8] of 2010, there were 22,581 people, 8,900 households, and 6,321 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,028.8 inhabitants per square mile (783.3/km2). There were 9,411 housing units at an average density of 845.6 per square mile (326.5/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 95.7% White, 1.1% African American, 0.1% Native American, 1.3% Asian, 0.4% from other races, and 1.4% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.4% of the population.

There were 8,900 households, of which 34.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.0% were married couples living together, 8.3% had a female householder with no husband present, 2.7% had a male householder with no wife present, and 29.0% were non-families. 25.1% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.53 and the average family size was 3.05.

The median age in the city was 41.9 years. 26.2% of residents were under the age of 18; 5.2% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 23.3% were from 25 to 44; 30.9% were from 45 to 64; and 14.5% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 48.3% male and 51.7% female.

Of the city's population over the age of 25, 49.3% hold a bachelor's degree or higher.[19]

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[9] of 2000, there were 18,145 people, 6,711 households, and 5,133 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,630.0 people per square mile (629.5/km2). There were 6,934 housing units at an average density of 622.9 per square mile (240.5/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 97.31% White, 0.45% African American, 0.16% Native American, 0.96% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.25% from other races, and 0.83% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.25% of the population.

There were 6,711 households, out of which 38.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 66.8% were married couples living together, 7.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.5% were non-families. 20.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.70 and the average family size was 3.14.

In the city the population was spread out, with 28.9% under the age of 18, 5.0% from 18 to 24, 29.5% from 25 to 44, 25.0% from 45 to 64, and 11.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 95.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.5 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $65,988, and the median income for a family was $76,603 (these figures had risen to $78,703 and $98,309 respectively as of a 2007 estimate[20]). Males had a median income of $57,294 versus $32,458 for females. The per capita income for the city was $32,336. About 3.0% of families and 4.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.3% of those under age 18 and 7.3% of those age 65 or over.

Schools[edit]

All public schools in the city are a part of Avon Lake City Schools.

There are four public elementary schools:

  • Eastview Elementary School (Kindergarten - 4th grade)
  • Erieview Elementary School (Kindergarten - 4th grade)
  • Redwood Elementary School (Kindergarten - 4th grade)
  • Westview Elementary School (Kindergarten - 4th grade)

and three upper-level schools:

  • Troy Intermediate School (5th - 6th grade)
  • Learwood Middle School (7th - 8th grade)
  • Avon Lake High School (9th - 12th grade)

The district was awarded the status of Excellent with Distinction by the Ohio Department of Education for 8 years in a row. In 2015, Avon Lake High School was listed 170th in the country in Newsweek's Top 500 U.S. High Schools with a graduation rate of 100% and a 95.9% college-bound rate.[21]

There is also a Catholic parochial school, St. Joseph's, that offers grades Kindergarten through 8.

Economy[edit]

Avon Lake is host to a number of industrial companies, including facilities for Lubrizol, Ford Motor Company, PolyOne Corporation, Western Enterprises, and Reliant Energy.[citation needed]

Recreation[edit]

Two people watch a sunset at Veterans Memorial Park in Avon Lake, OH.
Veterans Park is a popular recreational site.

Approximately 220 acres (0.9 km2) is designated for parks and playgrounds. Avon Lake operates six community parks: Bleser Park, Miller Road Park, Veterans Memorial Park, Weiss Field, Walker Road Park, and Bicentennial Park. Other neighborhood parks managed by the city include Belle Road Park, Inwood Park, Overlook Park, Resatar Park, and Sunset Park, each with adjoining bike trails to promote easy residential access and outdoor recreation.[22] The city also operates the Ellen Trivanovich Aquatic Center, which was rebuilt in 2010. The new facility includes a splash ground, lazy river, regulation lanes, three water slides, and zero-depth entry. The facility is open to residents and guests of residents. The city enforces a curfew, for ages 12 and under: 10:00pm, for ages 13 to 15: 11:00pm, and for ages 16 to 17: 1:00am.[23]

Library[edit]

Avon Lake is home to Avon Lake Public Library. The library was first established in January 1931 by a Board of Trustees as appointed by the Avon Lake Village Council and mayor. The opening budget was $1,000 and the first book purchased for the collection was Penrod by Booth Tarkington.[24] Today, the Avon Lake Public Library circulates over 620,000 items with a general fund of $2.9 million.[25]

Notable people[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Mayor's Office: Greetings from Avon Lake".
  2. ^ "Greg Zilka: Biography". Archived from the original on 2019-05-13. Retrieved 2019-05-16.
  3. ^ "Avon Lake City Council Members and Clerk".
  4. ^ "Avon Lake City Council Members and Clerk".
  5. ^ "Avon Lake City Council Members and Clerk".
  6. ^ "Avon Lake City Council Members and Clerk".
  7. ^ "2019 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 27, 2020.
  8. ^ a b "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06.
  9. ^ a b "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  10. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  11. ^ "Avon Lake City Council Members and Clerk".
  12. ^ "Avon Lake City Council Members and Clerk".
  13. ^ "Avon Lake City Council Members and Clerk".
  14. ^ "Tree Cities Ohio" [1]. " Arbor Day Foundation accessed 18 September 2020.
  15. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  16. ^ "2010 Census U.S. Gazetteer Files for Places – Ohio". United States Census. Archived from the original on 2016-07-02. Retrieved 2012-10-19.
  17. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2016.
  18. ^ "Avon Lake city, Ohio". census.gov. Retrieved June 28, 2022.
  19. ^ "Avon Lake (city) QuickFacts from the US Census Bureau". Quickfacts.census.gov. Archived from the original on 2016-01-15. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  20. ^ "American FactFinder". Factfinder.census.gov. Archived from the original on 2020-02-11. Retrieved 2013-02-24.
  21. ^ "America's Top High Schools 2015". Newsweek. 19 August 2015.
  22. ^ "Our Parks".
  23. ^ "The City of Avon Lake". Retrieved 2016-10-12.
  24. ^ "Avon Lake Public Library | Discovery begins here". Alpl.org. Archived from the original on 2016-01-15. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  25. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2016-01-15. Retrieved 2015-08-31.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  26. ^ a b Crump, Sarah; Dealer, The Plain (2010-08-22). "Sandy Alomar Jr. likes being back with the Indians and in Cleveland". cleveland. Retrieved 2021-07-13.
  27. ^ a b "The Complete Funky Winkerbean, Volume 2, 1975–1977 - The Kent State University Press". Retrieved 2021-07-13.
  28. ^ a b "Sandusky's Ed Bettridge was an NFL champion with the Browns". sanduskyregister.com. Retrieved 2021-07-13.
  29. ^ Harrison, Doug. "Canadian runner Nate Brannen hangs up spikes after 19 years". CBC.
  30. ^ a b Podolski, Mark. "'Super Joe' Charboneau reflects back 35 years ago when he was AL Rookie of the Year with the Indians in 1980". The News-Herald. Retrieved 2021-07-13.
  31. ^ "Carmella DeCesare". IMDb. Retrieved 2021-07-13.
  32. ^ a b "Singer-songwriter Anne E. DeChant is staying connected with her fans". chroniclet.com. Retrieved 2021-07-13.
  33. ^ a b Reporter, Tim Warsinskey / Plain Dealer (2009-10-30). "Cuyahoga Heights quarterback Zach D'Orazio has big plans by focusing on little things". cleveland. Retrieved 2021-07-13.
  34. ^ "usurped title". daftarslotindonesia88.wildapricot.org. Archived from the original on June 21, 2021. Retrieved 2021-07-13. {{cite web}}: Cite uses generic title (help)CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  35. ^ a b "Jeremy Griffiths Stats". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2021-07-13.
  36. ^ a b Turner, Jamie; clevel; .com (2008-12-05). "The Zydrunas Ilgauskas file". cleveland. Retrieved 2021-07-13.
  37. ^ Pledger, Marcia (February 23, 2013). "Cedar Fair's new CEO Matt Ouimet believes inspiring guests and employees is good for the bottom line". The Plain Dealer. Retrieved February 24, 2014.
  38. ^ "Fire at the Lake House - The Paintings of Daryl Urig". 2019-03-21. Retrieved 2021-07-13.

External links[edit]