Beijing–Harbin, Beijing–Hong Kong (Macau) passageway

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Beijing-Harbin, Beijing-Hong Kong (Macau) passageway
京哈~京港澳通道
MTR-High Speed Rail logo.svg
Overview
TypeHigh-speed rail
StatusPartly operational
LocalePeople's Republic of China
TerminiHarbin
Hong Kong
Macau
Operation
Operator(s)China Railway High-speed
Technical
Track gauge1,435 mm (4 ft 8 12 in) standard gauge
Electrification50 Hz 25,000 V
Operating speed200 to 350 km/h (124 to 217 mph)

The Beijing–Harbin, Beijing–Hong Kong (Macau) passageway is a high-speed rail passage connecting Harbin in Heilongjiang province to the Hong Kong and Macau Special Administrative Regions via Beijing. The passage will pass through the cities of Changchun, Shenyang, Beijing, Shijiazhuang, Zhengzhou, Wuhan, Changsha, and Guangzhou before splitting into two lines: one passing through Shenzhen before terminating at Hong Kong, the other passing through Zhuhai before terminating at Macau.

Announced in 2016 as part of the national "eight vertical and eight horizontal" high-speed railway network, the passage is essentially a merger of two lines previously under the "Four Vertical and Four Horizontal" high-speed railway network: the Beijing–Harbin high-speed railway and the Beijing–Guangzhou–Shenzhen–Hong Kong high-speed railway, with the addition of the Guangzhou–Macau branch line. The Shenyang–Dalian railway section, initially considered part of the Beijing–Harbin high-speed railway, now forms part of the Coastal passageway, a different rail passageway.

Route[edit]

Main route (Harbin to Hong Kong)[edit]

Section
Railway line
Description Designed
speed
(km/h)

Length
(km)

Construction
start date

Open date
Harbin–Shenyang
Harbin–Dalian high-speed railway (section)
HSR from Harbin to Shenyang, part of longer route to Dalian and Changchun. 350 (summer)
250 (winter)
2007-08-23 2012-12-01
Shenyang-Beijing
Beijing–Shenyang high-speed railway
HSR from Beijing to Shenyang via Chengde, Fuxin and Chaoyang 350 684 2014-02-28 2018-12-29 (Chengde South–Shenyang section)
2020 (Xinghuo–Chengde South section)
Beijing–Shijiazhuang
Beijing–Shijiazhuang high-speed railway
HSR from Beijing to Shijiazhuang 350 281 2008-10-08 2012-12-26[1]
Shijiazhuang–Wuhan
Shijiazhuang–Wuhan high-speed railway
HSR from Shijiazhuang to Zhengzhou 350 838 2008-10-15 2012-12-26[1]
HSR from Zhengzhou to Wuhan 2012-09-28[2]
Wuhan–Guangzhou
Wuhan–Guangzhou high-speed railway
HSR from Wuhan to Guangzhou via Changsha 350 968 2005-09-01 2009-12-26
2010-01-30[3]
Guangzhou–Shenzhen
Guangzhou–Shenzhen–Hong Kong Express Rail Link
Mainland section of the Express Rail Link. HSR from Guangzhou to Shenzhen North Railway Station. 350 116 2008-08-20 2011-12-26[4]
Mainland section of the Express Rail Link. HSR from Shenzhen North to the border of Hong Kong. 2015-12-30[5]
Shenzhen–Hong Kong
Guangzhou–Shenzhen–Hong Kong Express Rail Link (Hong Kong section)
Hong Kong section of the Express Rail Link. HSR from the border of Shenzhen to Hong Kong. 200 26 2010 2018-09-23[6]

Branch line (Guangzhou to Macau)[edit]

Section
Railway line
Description Designed
speed
(km/h)

Length
(km)

Construction
start date

Open date
Guangzhou–Zhuhai
Guangzhou–Zhuhai intercity railway (section)
Intercity railway between Guangzhou and Zhuhai.
Zhuhai Station next to Macau border.
200 187 2005-12-18 2011-01-07

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Beijing–Guangzhou high speed line completed". Railway Gazette. 2012-12-26. Retrieved 2012-12-28.
  2. ^ "New high-speed railway spurs debate over prices". People's Daily Online. 2012-09-27. Retrieved 2012-09-27.
  3. ^ "Guangzhou south railway station to open on Jan. 30". Newsgd.com. 2010-01-05. Retrieved 2013-10-08.
  4. ^ Lu, Yanan; Zeng, Yong (2011-12-26). "Guangzhou–Shenzhen high-speed railway opens". People's Daily Online. Retrieved 2011-12-26.
  5. ^ "Asia's largest underground railway station opens for business". SmartRail World. 2016-01-05. Retrieved 2016-01-29.
  6. ^ "MTR's Guangzhou high-speed rail link won't open until 2018 and is 30 per cent over budget". South China Morning Post. 2015-09-14. Retrieved 2016-01-29.