Cincinnatian Hotel

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Palace Hotel
Cincinnatian.jpg
Location Sixth and Vine streets, Cincinnati, Ohio
Coordinates 39°6′8.81″N 84°30′47.83″W / 39.1024472°N 84.5132861°W / 39.1024472; -84.5132861Coordinates: 39°6′8.81″N 84°30′47.83″W / 39.1024472°N 84.5132861°W / 39.1024472; -84.5132861
Architect Thomas J. Emery and Samuel Hannaford [1]
Architectural style Second Empire[1]
MPS Samuel Hannaford and Sons TR in Hamilton County
NRHP Reference # 80003071[1]
Added to NRHP March 3, 1980[1]

The Cincinnatian Hotel is a registered historic building in Downtown Cincinnati, Ohio, listed in the National Register on March 3, 1980.

The Cincinnatian Hotel is a member of Historic Hotels of America, the official program of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.[2]

History[edit]

Built in 1882, The Cincinnatian Hotel was designed as a “Grand Hotel” of the 19th century. Originally named the Palace Hotel, the eight-story French Second Empire hotel was the tallest building in Cincinnati[3] and designed by the same architect as Cincinnati’s Music Hall and City Hall. The Palace Hotel featured 300 guest rooms and a shared bathroom at either end of each corridor. The Palace hotel provided modern improvements such as electric lights and hydraulic elevators to its guests.[4] There were hitching posts outside and the hotel was located where the trolley cars made their turn.

The hotel underwent a renovation in 1987, reducing the 300 guest rooms to 146 rooms including seven suites. The renovation retained the old world charm of the hotel, the marble and walnut grand staircase continues to maintain its imposing lobby presence. The original Cricket Restaurant has since been replaced by the Palace Restaurant and the Cricket Lounge.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e National Park Service (2007-06-30). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  2. ^ "The Cincinnatian Hotel, a Historic Hotels of America member". Historic Hotels of America. Retrieved January 28, 2014. 
  3. ^ Stradling, David (Oct 1, 2003). "Cincinnati: From River City to Highway Metropolis". Arcadia Publishing. p. 73. Retrieved 2013-05-25. 
  4. ^ Kenny, Daniel J. (1895). "Illustrated Guide to Cincinnati and the World's Columbian Exposition". R. Clarke. p. 42. Retrieved 2013-05-22. 

External links[edit]