Core city

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The skyline of Manhattan as seen from Hudson County, New Jersey in March 2014. New York City is the core city of New York metropolitan area.

In urban planning, a core city, metropolitan core, or central city, is the largest or most important city of a metropolitan area. A core city is surrounded by smaller satellite cities, towns, and suburbs. A central city is usually the first settlement established in an urban region before the outlying districts came into existence, later in history. Central cities often form the regional downtowns of metro areas. The term is used mainly in US context, although since the 1970s it has also become relatively common in Canada and, to a lesser extent, Europe and Australia.[1][2][3][4]

Examples[edit]

Metropolitan areas with one core city[edit]

The followings are the core city of the five largest metropolitan areas in the world.

Metropolitan area Core city Country Metropolitan
population
Name Location
Greater Tokyo Area
(Kantō region)
Tokyo 35°41′23″N 139°41′32″E / 35.68972°N 139.69222°E / 35.68972; 139.69222 (Tokyo)  Japan 37,274,000[5]
Jakarta metropolitan area
(Jabodetabekpunjur)
Jakarta 6°10′30″S 106°49′43″E / 6.17500°S 106.82861°E / -6.17500; 106.82861 (Jakarta)  Indonesia 33,430,285[6]
Delhi metropolitan area
(Central National Capital Region)
Delhi 28°36′36″N 77°13′48″E / 28.61000°N 77.23000°E / 28.61000; 77.23000 (Delhi)  India 29,000,000[7]
Seoul Capital Area
(Sudogwon region)
Seoul 37°34′N 126°58′E / 37.567°N 126.967°E / 37.567; 126.967 (Seoul)  South Korea 25,514,000[8]
Mumbai Metropolitan Region Mumbai 18°58′30″N 72°49′33″E / 18.97500°N 72.82583°E / 18.97500; 72.82583 (Mumbai)  India 24,400,000[9]


Metropolitan areas with more than one core city[edit]

Metropolitan area Core cities Country Metropolitan
population
Name Location
Dallas–Fort Worth metroplex Dallas 32°46′45″N 96°48′32″W / 32.77917°N 96.80889°W / 32.77917; -96.80889 (Dallas)  United States 7,470,158[10]
Fort Worth 32°45′N 97°20′W / 32.750°N 97.333°W / 32.750; -97.333 (Fort Worth)
Rhine-Ruhr metropolitan region Essen 51°27′3″N 7°0′47″E / 51.45083°N 7.01306°E / 51.45083; 7.01306 (Essen)  Germany 1,555,985[11]
Düsseldorf 51°14′N 6°47′E / 51.233°N 6.783°E / 51.233; 6.783 (Düsseldorf)
Islamabad–Rawalpindi metropolitan area Islamabad 33°41′35″N 73°03′50″E / 33.69306°N 73.06389°E / 33.69306; 73.06389 (Islamabad)  Pakistan 4,500,000[12]
Rawalpindi 33°36′N 73°02′E / 33.600°N 73.033°E / 33.600; 73.033 (Rawalpindi)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Caves, R. W. (2004). Encyclopedia of the City. Routledge. p. 72.
  2. ^ "Central city definition and meaning | Collins English Dictionary".
  3. ^ "Definition of CENTRAL CITY". www.merriam-webster.com.
  4. ^ "Principal Cities 2012 Demographic Economic Patterns General Demographics". proximityone.com.
  5. ^ "Table 2.10 Population of Three Major Metropolitan Areas" (PDF). Statistics Bureau of Japan. p. 21. Retrieved 26 November 2013.
  6. ^ "Jabodetabekpunjur". perkotaan.bpiw.pu.go.id. Ministry of Public Works and People's Housing. Archived from the original on 6 February 2020. Retrieved 22 February 2020.
  7. ^ Sharma, Shantanu Nandan (February 17, 2019). "Delhi could be the world's most populous city by 2028. But is it really prepared?" – via The Economic Times.
  8. ^ ???? : ???? ???? (in Korean). Ministry of Government Administration and Home Affairs. Archived from the original on 3 March 2011. Retrieved 4 April 2015.
  9. ^ https://portal.mcgm.gov.in/irj/go/km/docs/documents/MCGM%20Department%20List/Roads%20and%20Traffic/Docs/CMP%20for%20Greater%20Mumbai/Executive%20Summary/Executive%20Summary.pdf
  10. ^ "Dallas - Fort Worth - Arlington (Metropolitan Statistical Area, Metropolitan Areas, USA) - Population Statistics, Charts, Map and Location". www.citypopulation.de.
  11. ^ "Metropolitan Area Populations". Eurostat. 18 June 2019. Retrieved 4 December 2019.
  12. ^ "Box-1: Rawalpindi–Islamabad Metrobus Project" (PDF). Ministry of Finance and Revenue. 30 June 2014. p. 197. Retrieved 11 March 2020.

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]