EMD G12

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EMD G12 series
Sl train.jpg
Class M2 570 - "ALBERTA" in Sri Lanka
Type and origin
Power type Diesel-electric
Builder General Motors Electro-Motive Division (USA),
General Motors Diesel (Canada)
Clyde Engineering (Australia)
Model G12
Build date 1953-1968
Total produced B-B version: 670
A1A-A1A version: 300
C-C version: 66
Specifications
AAR wheel arr. A1A-A1A and B-B
Gauge 1,000 mm (3 ft 3 38 in)
3 ft 6 in (1,067 mm)
4 ft 8 12 in (1,435 mm)
5 ft 3 in (1,600 mm)
5 ft 6 in (1,676 mm)
Loco weight 107 long tons (109 t; 120 short tons)
Fuel capacity 2,840 litres (750 US gal; 620 imp gal)
Prime mover EMD 567
Engine type two-stroke V12 diesel
Cylinders 12
Cylinder size 8.5 in × 10 in (216 mm × 254 mm)
Transmission Electric
Performance figures
Power output 1,310 or 1,425 bhp (977 or 1,063 kW)
Tractive effort 19,100 kgf (187.3 kN; 42,108.3 lbf)
Career
Disposition Most scrapped, many preserved, some still in service

The EMD G12 was a class of locomotive built by GM-EMD, and its Canadian affiliate General Motors Diesel. In addition, Australian licensee Clyde Engineering built ten locomotives for New Zealand in 1957, five for Hong Kong, 23 for Queensland, 14 for Western Australia and seven for BHP. Australian licensee Commonwealth Engineering also built 42 for Queensland Rail in 1964–66. Many examples were built in the 1950-1960s for railroads all over the world. They are powered by EMD 12-567C prime movers rated at 1,250 hp (930 kW). Some have been rebuilt with EMD 645 engines.

Original Owners[edit]

Bo-Bo version[edit]

Australia[edit]

Brazil[edit]

A total of 241 locomotives:

Canada[edit]

Chile[edit]

Egypt[edit]

  • 97 Egyptian Railways 3701–3797.[2] During the 1967 Six-Day War, Israel captured 4712, 3715, 3766 and 3795, which were appropriated to Israel Railways stock.

Israel[edit]

  • 23 Israel Railways 104–126,[3] some since rebuilt with 12-645E engines. After the 1967 Six-Day War, four captured Egyptian G12s were renumbered 127–130.[4]

Iran[edit]

Hong Kong[edit]

Mexico[edit]

Netherlands[edit]

South Korea[edit]

Nigeria[edit]

Norway[edit]

Sri Lanka[edit]

Class M2C 626–627 (Before 2010 it used only for upcountry between Rathmalana, Colombo- Kandy, Badulla.)

Venezuela[edit]

  • Government Coal Mines 01–03

A1A-A1A version[edit]

Argentina[edit]

Australia[edit]

Brazil[edit]

A total of 26 locomotives:

Indonesia[edit]

Mexico[edit]

New Zealand[edit]

Sri Lanka[edit]

Sri Lanka Railways Class M2D 628
  • 12 Sri Lanka Railways.[5] All except M2 571 still in daily operation (1). Classified as Class M2
    • Class M2 569–573 One Engine (As locomotives are called by Sri Lankans) (M2 571) destroyed by terrorism.
    • Class M2A 591–593
    • Class M2B 594–595
    • Class M2D 628–629

Taiwan[edit]

USA[edit]

Co-Co version[edit]

Australia[edit]

A total of 66 locomotives:

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.trafikverket.se/jarnvagsmuseum/publik-trafik/museitag/vara-tag/Diesel/T42-205/
  2. ^ Hughes, Hugh (1981). Middle East Railways. Harrow: Continental Railway Circle. p. 26. ISBN 0-9503469-7-7. 
  3. ^ Cotterell, Paul (1984). The Railways of Palestine and Israel. Abingdon: Tourret Publishing. p. 136. ISBN 0-905878-04-3.  External link in |publisher= (help)
  4. ^ Cotterell, 1984, page 103
  5. ^ http://www.infolanka.com/org/mrail/locos2.html


External links[edit]