Interstate 20 in Georgia

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This article is about the section of Interstate 20 in Georgia. For the entire route, see Interstate 20.
This article is about the current Interstate Highway. For the current state highway, see Georgia State Route 20.

Interstate 20 marker

Interstate 20
Route information
Maintained by Georgia DOT
Length: 202.61 mi[2][3] (326.07 km)
Existed: 1963[1] – present
Major junctions
West end: I‑20 at the Alabama state line
 
East end: I-20 at the South Carolina state line in Augusta
Location
Counties: Haralson, Carroll, Douglas, Cobb, Fulton, DeKalb, Rockdale, Newton, Walton, Morgan, Greene, Taliaferro, Warren, McDuffie, Columbia, Richmond
Highway system
  • Georgia State Routes
SR 19 SR 20
SR 401 SR 402 SR 403

In the U.S. state of Georgia, Interstate 20 (I-20) travels from the Alabama state line to the Savannah River, which is the South Carolina state line. The highway enters the state near Tallapoosa. It travels through the Atlanta metropolitan area and exits the state in Augusta. The highway also travels through the cities of Bremen, Douglasville, Conyers, Covington, and Madison. I-20 has the unsigned state highway designation of State Route 402 (SR 402).

Route description[edit]

Although the designation does not appear on shields, Georgia DOT refers to the highway as SR 402

I-20 is four lanes wide in much of the state.[citation needed] In the Atlanta metropolitan area, the highway ranges from six lanes wide in the most outlying counties to 10 lanes wide in downtown Atlanta.[citation needed]

Haralson County[edit]

I-20 enters Georgia from Alabama south-southwest of Tallapoosa. The state line is the CentralEastern time zone boundary. It travels to the east-northeast and crosses over Williams Creek. It passes the Georgia Visitor Information Center. The highway crosses over Walton Creek just before briefly entering the city limits of Tallapoosa. Immediately after it leaves the city limits, it has an interchange with SR 100. Within the interchange, I-20 enters the city limits of Tallapoosa twice more. After crossing over Blalock Creek, it curves to the east. After it curves back to the east-northeast, it crosses over Walker Creek twice. It curves to the east-southeast and travels along the southern edge of Waco, where it has an interchange with Waco Road. The interstate then enters Bremen. Almost immediately, it then enters Carroll County.

Carroll County[edit]

I-20 curves to the east and has an interchange with US 27/SR 1. It leaves Bremen and travels southeast of the city. It curves back to the east-northeast and crosses over Buck Creek. Right after the creek, the westbound lanes have a weigh station. The highway travels south of Spence Lake. It curves to the northeast and crosses over Allen Creek. It enters the city limits of Temple and crosses over Bethel Creek. After a crossing of Webster Creek, the highway curves to the east-northeast and has an interchange with SR 113 (Carrollton Street). It curves to the east-southeast and leaves Temple. It crosses the Little Tallapoosa River and then curves back to the east-northeast. It curves to the east and enters Villa Rica. It travels just south of Villa Rica High School. Immediately, it has an interchange with SR 61/SR 101. It curves to the east-northeast and passes the Glanton–Hindsman Elementary School. It then enters Douglas County.

Douglas and Cobb counties[edit]

After I-20 starts curving to the east-southeast, it has an interchange with Liberty Road. It leaves the city limits of Villa Rica and curves to the east. It crosses over Keaton Creek. It curves back to the east-southeast and has an interchange with Post Road southwest of Winston. It curves to the east-northeast and crosses over Mobley Creek. It enters Douglasville. It has an interchange with SR 5 (Bill Arp Road). It then passes the Arbor Place Mall on its northern side. It crosses over Anneewakee Creek and then has an interchange with Chapel Hill Road. The highway curves to the northeast and passes the WellStar Douglas Hospital on its eastern side. After crossing over Slater Mill Creek, it has an interchange with SR 92 (Fairburn Road). Within the interchange, I-20 crosses over Little Anneewakee Creek. It then travels along the Lithia Springs–Douglasville city line before briefly re-entering Douglasville proper. It then very briefly travels along the Lithia Springs–Dawsonville city line. There, it has an interchange with Lee Road and crosses over Beaver Creek. Immediately after the interchange begins, the interstate enters Lithia Springs proper. It briefly leaves the city limits of Lithia Springs and crosses over Sweetwater Creek on the Blair Bridge. Upon re-entering the city, it curves to the east-southeast and has an interchange with SR 6 (Thornton Road). Right after leaving the interchange, it leaves Lithia Springs again and enters Cobb County. I-20 then has an interchange with both the northern terminus of Riverside Parkway and the eastern terminus of Six Flags Drive. Almost immediately is a partial interchange with Six Flags Parkway. This interchange is only accessible from the westbound lanes. At this interchange, the highway begins to travel along the southern edge of Mableton. It then crosses over the Chattahoochee River on the Debra Mills Commemorative Bridge. This marks the eastern end of Mableton, as well as the Fulton County line.

Fulton County[edit]

I-20 then has an interchange with SR 70 (Fulton Industrial Boulevard). It curves to the east-northeast and enters the western part of Atlanta, on the AdamsvilleOld Gordon neighborhood line. At a bridge over SR 139, the highway begins traveling along the Adamsville–Fairburn Heights neighborhood line. After passing Collier Heights Park, it curves to the southeast and has an interchange with I-285 (Atlanta Bypass). This interchange is just south of the Basoline E. Usher Elementary School and on the southwestern edge of Harwell Heights Park. Right after the I-285 interchange, the highway briefly travels on the WesthavenCollier Heights neighborhood line. It crosses over Sandy Creek and then has an interchange with SR 280 (Holmes Drive). At this interchange, it begins to briefly travel on the Westhaven–Dixie Hills neighborhood line. Just southeast of this interchange, it travels along the Florida Heights–Dixie Hills neighborhood line. At a crossing of Fairfield Place NW, I-20 begins to parallel SR 139. Just north of Westview Cemetery, it travels along the southern edge of the Penelope Neighbors neighborhood. The highway curves to the east-northeast and has an interchange with Martin Luther King Jr. Drive. It immediately curves back to the southeast and begins to travel along the southern edge of the Mozley Park neighborhood. Upon traveling under a bridge that carries Westview Drive SW, it begins traveling along the Westview–Mozley Park neighborhood line. Upon reaching a partial interchange with Langhorn Street SW, which is only accessible from the westbound lanes, it enters the West End neighborhood. Upon crossing over Lawton Street SW, it begins to briefly travel on the West End–Harris Chiles neighborhood line. The interstate curves to the east-southeast and has an interchange with Lowery Boulevard. It passes The Mall West End at a partial interchange with Lee Street, which is only accessible from the westbound lanes. At this interchange, I-20 begins to very briefly travel along the West End–Atlanta University Center neighborhood line. Upon crossing over US 29/SR 14/SR 154, it briefly travels through the Adair Park neighborhood. Upon crossing over US 19/US 41/SR 3, the highway slips through the northern part of the Pittsburgh neighborhood. It curves to the northeast and – almost immediately – enters the Mechanicsville neighborhood. It has an interchange with McDaniel Street SW that leads to US 19/US 29. At this interchange, it begins to travel along the Mechanicsville–Castleberry Hill neighborhood line. At an interchange with Windsor and Spring streets, it begins traveling along the Mechanicsville–Downtown line. I-20 then has an interchange with I-75/I-85 (Downtown Connector). On the east side of this interchange, it begins to travel along the SummerhillCapitol Gateway neighborhood line. It briefly travels on the Grant Park–Capitol Gateway neighborhood line before entering Grant Park proper. It has a partial interchange with Capitol Avenue, which is only accessible from the westbound lanes. Right after that is a partial interchange with Hill Street, which is also only accessible from the westbound lanes. It then has an interchange with Boulevard. It very briefly travels along the Grant Park–Reynoldstown neighborhood line. Then, it travels along the Glenwood Park–Reynoldstown neighborhood line. There, it has a partial interchange that leads to Memorial Drive and Glenwood Avenue. This interchange feeds into Bill Kennedy Way SE. Then, it briefly travels along the North Ormewood Park–Reynoldstown neighborhood line. It has an interchange with US 23/SR 42 (Moreland Avenue). At this interchange, the highway enters DeKalb County.

DeKalb County[edit]

I-20 enters the eastern part of the city of Atlanta. It begins to travel on the East AtlantaEdgewood neighborhood line. Just before a partial interchange with Maynard Terrace, which is only accessible from the eastbound lanes, the highway begins to travel along the East Atlanta–Kirkwood neighborhood line and begins to parallel Sugar Creek. It curves to the southeast and has an interchange with SR 260 (Glenwood Avenue). At this interchange, the highway temporarily leaves the city limits of Atlanta. It curves to the south-southwest, veering away from Sugar Creek. It briefly re-enters the East Atlanta neighborhood of Atlanta. Here, it has a partial interchange with Flat Shoals Road, which is only accessible from the eastbound lanes, travels under a bridge carrying Fayetteville Road, and begins to curve back to the southeast. It then travels along the northern edge of Gresham Park. It crosses over Sugar Creek and has an interchange with Gresham Road and Flat Shoals Road. Within this interchange, it curves to a due east direction. On the east side of the interchange, it begins to travel along the PanthersvilleCandler-McAfee line. It passes McNair Middle School to the south and then curves to the east-northeast. It has an interchange with SR 155 (Candler Road). It travels just to the south of Misty Waters Park. It begins to curve to the east-southeast and has a partial interchange with Columbia Drive, which is only accessible from the eastbound lanes. Almost immediately is a second interchange with I-285 (Atlanta Bypass). At the east end of the interchange is a side access road, which leads to an interchange with Wesley Chapel and Snapfinger roads, and a crossing of Cobbs Creek and Fowler Branch. The interstate crosses over Wesley Chapel Road and curves to the southeast. It crosses over Snapfinger Creek and begins to curve to the east-northeast. At the curve, it travels just to the south of Walden Lake. It crosses over Panthers Branch and then has an interchange with Panola Road. It then passes DeKalb Medical – Hillandale on its south side. It then passes Hillandale Memorial Gardens just before an interchange with Evans Mill Road and Lithonia Industrial Boulevard. Within this interchange, the highway curves to the east-southeast and crosses over Pole Bridge Creek. It then crosses over Honey Creek just before passing the Mall at Stonecrest just to its north. Just to the northeast of the mall, I-20 has an interchange with US 278/SR 12 and the western terminus of SR 124. At this interchange, SR 124 ends, and US 278/SR 12 begins a concurrency with I-20. The three highways curve to the southeast and enter Rockdale County.

Rockdale and Newton counties[edit]

I-20/US 278/SR 12 has an interchange with Sigman Road. The three highways cross over Almand Creek and then enter the city limits of Conyers. They have an interchange with West Avenue. Within this interchange, they cross over Tanyard Branch. They pass the Rockdale Tennis Center just to its north and then have an interchange with SR 20/SR 138. They cross over Snapping Shoals Creek and then have an interchange with SR 162 (Salem Road). At this interchange, they leave the city limits of Conyers. After curving to the east-southeast, they enter Newton County. I-20/US 278/SR 12 curves back to the southeast. Just after beginning to curve back to the east-southeast, the three highways meet Almon Road on the southeastern edge of Almon. They cross over the Yellow River and then curve to the southeast. They pass Lawnwood Memorial Park to its north and then enter the city limits of Covington. At the first interchange in the city, US 278/SR 12 leaves I-20, and the interstate begins to curve to the northeast. It travels on a bridge over Old Atlanta Highway and some railroad tracks of CSX. After traveling under a bridge that carries SR 81, it very briefly cuts across the extreme southeastern corner of Oxford and then re-enters Covington. It crosses over Dried Indian Creek and curves to a nearly due east direction. It has an interchange with Alcovy Road. Just after this interchange, it temporarily leaves the city limits of Covington again and curves to the east-southeast. After an interchange with SR 142 (Hazelbrand Road), it re-enters Covington. It crosses over the Alcovy River before leaving Covington for its third and final time. The highway curves to the east-northeast and then has an interchange with SR 11. It curves to the east-southeast and crosses over Nelson Creek. Right after crossing over the Little River, it has another interchange with US 278/SR 12. At this interchange, it enters Walton County.

Walton and Morgan counties[edit]

I-20 immediately begins traveling along the southern edge of Social Circle. The highway has a crossing of Dennis Creek and then leaves Social Circle and enters Morgan County. I-20's eastbound lanes have a rest area. Then, the highway crosses over Hunnicut Creek. It curves to the southeast and has an interchange with Newborn Road. After the westbound lanes have a rest area, the highway curves to the east-northeast. It crosses over Big Indian Creek and then curves to the southeast. It enters the city limits of Madison. The highway crosses over Little Indian Creek just before an interchange with SR 83 (Monticello Road). It travels on a bridge over Fourmile Branch and some railroad tracks of Norfolk Southern Railway. It curves to a nearly due east direction and has an interchange with US 129/US 441/SR 24 (Eatonton Road). I-20 leaves the city limits of Madison and crosses over the South Sugar Creek. After a crossing of North Sugar Creek It curves to a southeasterly direction and has an interchange with Seven Island Road It travels just south of the Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forest and curves to the east-northeast. A crossing of Lake Oconee marks the Greene County line.

Greene County[edit]

I-20 crosses over Richland Creek and then has an interchange with SR 44. It briefly travels through the southwestern part of Greensboro. Just after traveling under a bridge that carries Veazey Road, the highway travels along the southeastern edge of Greensboro. The highway crosses over Beaverdam Creek and curves to the east-southeast. It has crossings of Oliver Creek, Bowden Creek, and SR 15, before entering Siloam. There, it has an interchange with SR 77, which drivers can take to get to SR 15. The highway curves to the northeast and leaves the city limits of Siloam. It curves back to the east-southeast and crosses over the South Fork Ogeechee River. It then enters Taliaferro County.

Taliaferro and Warren counties[edit]

I-20 begins to parallel Beaverdam Creek. It curves to the east-northeast and crosses over the creek. It curves to the east-southeast and crosses over the North Fork Ogeechee River before an interchange with SR 22. It crosses over Mile Branch. The highway curves to the southeast and then enters Warren County. Almost immediately, I-20 crosses over Red Lick Creek. It curves to the east-northeast and has another interchange with US 278/SR 12 (Atlanta Highway). It begins to parallel Williams Creek before crossing over it. It begins to curve to the southeast before it has an interchange with Cadley Road. After crossing over Hart Creek, the highway curves to the east-northeast. It crosses over Middle Creek and then crosses over some railroad tracks of CSX before an interchange with SR 80 (Washington Highway). It crosses over Childers Creek just before entering McDuffie County.

McDuffie County[edit]

After an interchange with Three Points Road, that directs drivers to Thomson, I-20 crosses over Mattox Creek. It then has an interchange with SR 17 (Washington Road). At the east end of this interchange, it travels under a bridge that carries US 78/SR 10/SR 17 Bypass (Thomson Bypass). It crosses over Little Germany Creek before curving to the east-southeast. It crosses over Germany Creek on the southern edge of Upper Folly Lake. Almost immediately is an interchange with SR 150 (Cobbham Road). It crosses over Greenbrier Creek just before entering Columbia County.

Columbia County[edit]

I-20 crosses over Kiokee Creek before the eastbound lanes have a rest area. Right after crossing over Hawes Branch, the westbound lanes have a rest area. The highway then has an interchange with US 221/SR 47 (Appling–Harlem Road). It then crosses over Little Kiokee Creek. First, the eastbound lanes and then, the westbound lanes have a weigh station just to the south of Baker Place Elementary School, Columbia Middle School, and Grovetown High School. It crosses over Euchee Creek and Mill Branch before an interchange with SR 388 (Horizon South Parkway/Lewiston Road). This interchange is the main access point for Grovetown. Almost immediately, it crosses over Tudor Branch. After crossing over Walton Branch, the interstate begins to travel along the southern edge of Evans. It curves to the east-northeast and crosses over Crawford Creek. It then has an interchange with SR 383 (South Belair Road). Here, it leaves Evans and begins to travel along the southern edge of Martinez. It has an interchange with Wheeler Road. Within this interchange, it leaves Martinez and enters Richmond County.

Richmond County[edit]

Immediately, I-20 enters the city limits of Augusta. It travels just to the north of Doctors Hospital just before an interchange with the eastern terminus of SR 232 and the western terminus of I-520 (Bobby Jones Expressway). The westbound interchange has access for Walton Way Extension. After crossing over Cranes Creek, it travels south of Warren Road Elementary School. It curves to the northeast and has an interchange with SR 28 (Washington Road). The highway travels to the east of Westside High School. It crosses over some railroad tracks of CSX before an interchange with SR 104 (RiverWatch Parkway). The westbound lanes meet the Georgia Visitor Information Center. It crosses over the Augusta Canal and then the Savannah River. Here, the hidden SR 402 designation reaches its eastern terminus, while I-20 enters South Carolina.

Named sections[edit]

Several stretches of I-20 are named for various people and reasons:

  • From the Alabama state line to I-285 on the west side of Atlanta, I-20 is named the Tom Murphy Freeway, after the former speaker of the Georgia House of Representatives.[4][5]
  • Between both the west and east sides of I-285, I-20 was named the Ralph David Abernathy Freeway in 1991 after the late civil rights activist.[6]
  • From I-285 in Dekalb County to US 129/US 441/SR 24 in the southern part of Madison, I-20 is named the Purple Heart Highway for military veterans who either died or were injured in combat while in service on or after April 15, 1917.[7]
  • Between US 129/US 441/SR 24 and the South Carolina state line, I-20 is named the Carl Sanders Highway after the former Georgia governor who was born in Augusta.[8]

National Highway System[edit]

In Georgia, all of I-20 is included as part of the National Highway System, a system of routes determined to be the most important for the nation's economy, mobility, and defense.[9][10][11]

History[edit]

I-20 eastbound at the I-520 interchange. Flyover ramp under construction for I-20 westbound to I-520 eastbound

In Georgia, the first segment of I-20 opened between 1960 and 1963 from downtown Atlanta to Conyers.[12][1] It was under construction from just south of Douglasville to downtown Atlanta, from Conyers to a point south of Social Circle, and from Evans to Augusta.[1] By 1966, the highway was proposed from the Alabama state line to SR 5 in Douglasville, was open from Douglasville to the western part of Atlanta, under construction in the western part of Atlanta, was open from downtown Atlanta to US 278/SR 12 near Social Circle, was under construction from that point to SR 83 in Madison; proposed from Madison to the Warren–McDuffie county line, under construction from there to the South Carolina state line.[1][13] Later that year, I-20 was open from Douglasville to the Social Circle area and from SR 383 on the Evans–Martinez city line to the South Carolina state line.[13][14] In 1967, it was under construction from the Social Circle area to Siloam. It was open from US 221/SR 47 south of Appling to the South Carolina state line.[14][15] In 1968, it was open from Douglasville to Madison and from just north of Thomson to the South Carolina state line.[15][16] In 1969, the highway was open from Douglasville to US 129/US 441/SR 24 in Madison.[16][17] In 1970, it was under construction from Madison to the Thomson area.[17][18] In 1971, I-20 was open from Douglasville to SR 44 in Greensboro.[18][19] In 1972, the highway was open from Douglasville to the South Carolina state line.[19][20] In 1973, it was under construction from US 27/SR 1 in Bremen to Douglasville.[20][21] In 1974, it was under construction from the Alabama state line to Douglasville.[21][22] In 1975, it was open from Villa Rica to Douglasville.[22][23] The last part of Interstate 20 opened in 1977 between the Alabama state line and Villa Rica.[24][25]

Until 2000, the state of Georgia used the sequential interchange numbering system on all of its Interstate Highways. The first exit on each highway would begin with the number "1" and increase numerically with each exit. In 2000, the Georgia Department of Transportation switched to a mileage-based exit system, in which the exit number corresponded to the nearest milepost.[26][27][28]

From a period of late 2014 to mid-2015, I-20 was widened from the Alabama state line eastward to Villa Rica, GA. Most of that length had the roadway widened from four to six lanes, with ultimate plans to widen to at least six lanes from Birmingham, Alabama to Atlanta. Phase 1, which detailed resurfacing the roadway for future expansion preparation, has been completed as of January 2017. Phase 2 is being prepared to add the additional lanes.

On April 17, 2017, an abandoned gas pipeline exploded under Interstate 20.[29]

Exit list[edit]

County Location mi km Old exit New exit Destinations Notes
Haralson I‑20 west – Birmingham Continuation into Alabama; Central–Eastern time zone boundary
Georgia Visitor Information Center
accessible from eastbound lanes only
Tallapoosa 1 5 SR 100 – Tallapoosa, Bowdon
2 9 Waco Road – West Georgia Technical College
Carroll 3 11 US 27 (SR 1) – Bremen, Carrollton, University of West Georgia
Weigh station
accessible from westbound lanes only
Temple 4 19 SR 113 – Temple
Villa Rica 5 24 SR 61 / SR 101 – Villa Rica, Dallas Former US 78S and US 78 Alt.
Douglas 6 26 Liberty Road – Villa Rica Signed as SR 8 Conn. on the exit ramp, but not on I-20
7 30 Post Road
Douglasville 8 34 SR 5 (Bill Arp Road) – Douglasville
9 36 Chapel Hill Road
10 37 SR 92 (Fairburn Road) – Douglasville
DouglasvilleLithia Springs line 11 41 Lee Road – Lithia Springs
Blair Bridge over Sweetwater Creek
Lithia Springs 12 44 SR 6 (Thornton Road) – Austell, Powder Springs
Cobb 13 46 Riverside Parkway south/Six Flags Drive west – Six Flags Park Signed as exits 46A (Riverside Parkway) and 46B (Six Flags Drive) westbound; northern terminus of Riverside Parkway; eastern terminus of Six Flags Drive
Mableton 13C 47 Six Flags Parkway – Six Flags Park Westbound exit and eastbound entrance
Chattahoochee River Debra Mills Commemorative Bridge
Fulton 14 49 SR 70 (Fulton Industrial Boulevard) – Fulton County Airport
Atlanta 15 51 I‑285 (SR 407 / Atlanta Bypass) – Montgomery, Macon, Chattanooga, Greenville I-285 exits 10A-B; signed as exits 51A (south) and 51B (north)
16 52 SR 280 (Hamilton E. Holmes Drive) Signed as exits 52A (south) and 52B (north) westbound
17 53 To SR 139 (Martin Luther King Jr. Drive)
18 54 Langhorn Street to Cascade Road Westbound exit and eastbound entrance
19 55A Lowery Boulevard – West End
20 55B Lee Street – Atlanta University Center, Fort McPherson Westbound exit and eastbound entrance
21 56A US 19 / US 29 (McDaniel Street) Eastbound exit and westbound entrance
22 56B Windsor Street, Spring Street – Turner Field
23 57 I‑75 (SR 401) / I‑85 (SR 403 / Downtown Connector) – Macon, Montgomery, Chattanooga, Greenville I-75/I-85 exit 247
24 58A Capitol Avenue – Downtown Westbound exit and eastbound entrance
25 58B Hill Street – Turner Field Westbound exit and eastbound entrance
26 59A Boulevard – Zoo Atlanta, Cyclorama
27 59B To Memorial Drive, Glenwood Avenue Eastbound exit and westbound entrance
FultonDeKalb
county line
28 60 US 23 (SR 42 / Moreland Avenue) Signed as exits 60A (south) and 60B (north) eastbound
DeKalb 29 61A Maynard Terrace Eastbound exit and westbound entrance
30 61B SR 260 (Glenwood Avenue)
31 62 Flat Shoals Road Eastbound exit and westbound entrance
Gresham ParkPanthersville
Candler-McAfee tripoint
32 63 Flat Shoals Road, Gresham Road
PanthersvilleCandler-McAfee line 33 65 SR 155 (Candler Road) – Decatur
34 66 Columbia Drive Eastbound exit and westbound entrance
35 67 I‑285 (SR 407 / Atlanta Bypass) – Macon, Chattanooga, Greenville I-285 south exit 46, north exits 46A-B; signed as exits 67A (south) and 67B (north) westbound; Pierre Howard Interchange
36 68 Wesley Chapel Road, Snapfinger Road
37 71 Panola Road
38 74 Evans Mill Road, Lithonia Industrial Boulevard – Lithonia
39 75 US 278 west / SR 124 east (SR 12 / Turner Hill Road) West end of US 278/SR 12 concurrency; western terminus of SR 124
Rockdale 40 78 Sigman Road
Conyers 41 80 West Avenue – Conyers
42 82 SR 20 / SR 138 – Conyers, Monroe, Athens
43 84 SR 162 (Salem Road)
Newton 44 88 Almon Road – Porterdale
Covington 45 90 US 278 east (SR 12) – Covington, Oxford, Oxford College of Emory University East end of US 278/SR 12 concurrency
45A 92 Alcovy Road
46 93 SR 142 (Hazelbrand Road) – Covington, Oxford
47 98 SR 11 – Monroe, Monticello, Charlie Elliott Wildlife Center, Georgia Perimeter College – Newton Campus, Social Circle, Mansfield
Social Circle 48 101 US 278 (SR 12) – State Headquarters Wildlife Resources Div.
Walton
No major junctions
Morgan Rest area
accessible from eastbound lanes only
49 105 Rutledge, Newborn, Hard Labor Creek State Park Road is Newborn Road.
Rest area
accessible from westbound lanes only
Madison 50 113 SR 83 – Madison, Monticello
51 114 US 129 / US 441 (SR 24 / Eatonton Road) – Madison, Eatonton, Athens, Milledgeville, University of Georgia, Georgia College & State University, Antebellum Trail, Rock Eagle, Lake Oconee, Lake Sinclair
52 121 Buckhead, Lake Oconee Road is Seven Island Road.
Greene Greensboro 53 130 SR 44 (Lake Oconee Parkway) – Greensboro, Eatonton, Lake Oconee
Siloam 54 138 SR 77 to SR 15 – Siloam, Union Point, Sparta, Sandersville
Taliaferro 55 148 SR 22 – Crawfordville, Sparta, Washington
Warren 56 154 US 278 (SR 12) – Warrenton, Washington
57 160 Norwood Road is Cadley Road.
58 165 SR 80 – Camak
McDuffie 169 Thomson Road is Three Points Road.
59 172 SR 17 (Washington Road) – Thomson, Washington, Lincolnton Former route of US 78/SR 10
60 175 SR 150 (Cobbham Road) – Thomson, Mistletoe State Park
Columbia Rest area
accessible from eastbound lanes only
Rest area
accessible from westbound lanes only
61 183 US 221 (SR 47 / Appling–Harlem Road) – Appling, Harlem, Clarks Hill Lake, Laurel and Hardy Museum
Weigh station
accessible from eastbound lanes only
Weigh station
accessible from westbound lanes only
62 190 SR 388 (Horizon South Parkway/Lewiston Road) – Grovetown
EvansMartinez line 63 194 SR 383 (Belair Road/Jimmie Dyess Parkway) – Evans SR 383's name change is just south of I-20.
ColumbiaRichmond
county line
MartinezAugusta line 63A 195 Wheeler Road
Richmond Augusta 64 196 I‑520 east / SR 232 west (Bobby Jones Expressway) – Martinez, Daniel Field I-520 north exit 1, south exits 1A-B; signed as exits 196A (east) and 196B (west) eastbound; eastern terminus of SR 232; western terminus of I-520; westbound lanes has access for Walton Way Extension.
65 199 SR 28 (Washington Road) – Augusta, Augusta University, Paine College
66 200 SR 104 (RiverWatch Parkway) – Augusta, Augusta Historic Districts, Augusta Canal
Georgia Visitor Information Center
accessible from westbound lanes only
I-20 east – Columbia Continuation into South Carolina
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Auxiliary routes[edit]

Interstate 520[edit]

Main article: Interstate 520

Interstate 520
Location: Augusta, GeorgiaNorth Augusta, South Carolina
Length: 23.34 mi[30] (37.56 km)
Existed: 1980–present

Interstate 520 (I-520) is a 23.34-mile-long (37.56 km) auxiliary route from Augusta, Georgia to North Augusta, South Carolina. Approximately 16.14 miles (25.97 km) of the highway is in Georgia. It is also known as the Bobby Jones Expressway in Georgia and the Palmetto Parkway in South Carolina. The Georgia part of the highway has an unsigned designation of State Route 415 (SR 415).

Interstate 420[edit]

Interstate 420
Location: Atlanta
Length: 5.40 mi (8.69 km)
Existed: 1983–1986

Interstate 420 (I-420) was an auxiliary Interstate Highway that was planned to bypass south of Atlanta. It is now known as Arthur B. Langford Jr. Parkway. If built, it would have had the unsigned designation State Route 414 (SR 414).

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d State Highway Department of Georgia (1963). State Highway System and Other Principal Connection Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved July 10, 2016.  (Corrected to June 1, 1963.)
  2. ^ Adderly, Kevin (January 27, 2016). "Table 1: Main Routes of the Dwight D. Eisenhower National System of Interstate and Defense Highways as of December 31, 2015". Route Log and Finder List. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved July 17, 2016. 
  3. ^ "Interstate 20". Interstate-Guide.com. Interstate Guide. Retrieved February 15, 2008. [self-published source]
  4. ^ "Tom Murphy (1924–2007)". New Georgia Encyclopedia. Retrieved December 21, 2016. 
  5. ^ "Tom Murphy Freeway: Designated" (PDF). Georgia Department of Transportation. July 18, 1991. Retrieved October 18, 2014. 
  6. ^ "Ralph David Abernathy Freeway: Designated" (PDF). Georgia Department of Transportation. April 18, 1991. Retrieved October 19, 2014. 
  7. ^ "Purple Heart Highway: Designated" (PDF). Georgia Department of Transportation. April 8, 1996. Retrieved October 18, 2014. 
  8. ^ "Carl Sanders Highway: Designated" (PDF). Georgia Department of Transportation. February 15, 1996. Retrieved October 18, 2014. 
  9. ^ National Highway System: Georgia (PDF) (Map). Federal Highway Administration. March 25, 2015. Retrieved December 21, 2016. 
  10. ^ National Highway System: Atlanta, GA (PDF) (Map). Federal Highway Administration. March 25, 2015. Retrieved December 21, 2016. 
  11. ^ National Highway System: Augusta-Richmond County, GA--SC (PDF) (Map). Federal Highway Administration. March 25, 2015. Retrieved December 21, 2016. 
  12. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1960). State Highway System and Other Principal Connection Roads (PDF) (Map) (1960–61 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved December 25, 2016.  (Corrected to June 1, 1960.)
  13. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1966). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved December 25, 2016. 
  14. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1967). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved December 25, 2016. 
  15. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1968). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved December 25, 2016. 
  16. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1969). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved December 25, 2016. 
  17. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1970). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved December 25, 2016. 
  18. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1971). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved December 25, 2016. 
  19. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1972). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved December 25, 2016. 
  20. ^ a b Georgia Department of Transportation (January 1973). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved December 25, 2016. 
  21. ^ a b Georgia Department of Transportation (January 1974). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map) (1974–75 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved December 25, 2016. 
  22. ^ a b Georgia Department of Transportation (January 1975). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map) (1975–76 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved December 25, 2016. 
  23. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (January 1976). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map) (1976–77 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved December 25, 2016. 
  24. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (January 1977). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map) (1977–78 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved December 25, 2016. 
  25. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (January 1977). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map) (1977–78 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved December 25, 2016. 
  26. ^ Phillips, Noelle (November 29, 1999). "State Will Change Interstate Exit Numbers in January". SavannahNOW. Retrieved October 18, 2014. 
  27. ^ Phillips, Noelle (December 1, 1999). "Interstate Exit Signs to Get New Numbers in Georgia". The Florida Times-Union. Retrieved October 18, 2014. 
  28. ^ Deck, Ben (January 16, 2000). "DOT to Change Interstate Exit Numbers". Athens Banner-Herald. Retrieved October 18, 2014. 
  29. ^ Eldridge, Ellen; Stirgus, Eric. "2 Lanes on I-20 West Open After Highway Buckles; Repairs Underway". Atlanta Journal Constitution. Retrieved April 17, 2017. 
  30. ^ "Table 2: Auxiliary Routes of the Dwight D. Eisenhower National System Of Interstate and Defense Highways as of December 31, 2015". Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved December 21, 2016. 

External links[edit]

Route map: Bing / Google

KML is from Wikidata

Media related to Interstate 20 in Georgia at Wikimedia Commons


Interstate 20
Previous state:
Alabama
Georgia Next state:
South Carolina