Hunter Dozier

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Hunter Dozier
Hunter Dozier on June 30, 2016.jpg
Dozier with the Omaha Storm Chasers in 2016
Kansas City Royals – No. 17
First baseman / Third baseman / Outfielder
Born: (1991-08-22) August 22, 1991 (age 26)
Wichita Falls, Texas
Bats: Right Throws: Right
MLB debut
September 12, 2016, for the Kansas City Royals
MLB statistics
(through June 20, 2018)
Batting average .231
Home runs 3
Runs batted in 9
Teams

Hunter William Dozier (born August 22, 1991) is an American professional baseball first basemen and outfielder for the Kansas City Royals of Major League Baseball (MLB). The Royals selected Dozier eighth overall in the first round of the 2013 MLB draft after he played college baseball at Stephen F. Austin State University. He made his MLB debut in 2016.

Amateur career[edit]

Dozier attended Denton High School in Denton, Texas, where he played for the school's baseball and American football teams;[1][2] Dozier played shortstop for the baseball team and quarterback in football. His football career was hampered by a broken collarbone in his junior year. He focused on baseball in his senior year of high school having intention to play college baseball.[3]

Dozier went on to Stephen F. Austin State University, where he played college baseball for the Stephen F. Austin Lumberjacks baseball team. In 2013, he was named the Southland Conference Player of the Year[4] and a finalist for the Brooks Wallace Award, given annually to the best shortstop in college baseball.[5]

Professional career[edit]

The Royals selected Dozier with the eighth overall selection in the 2013 MLB Draft. Dozier signed with the Royals for a $2.2 million signing bonus, below the slot value of $3,117,800 allotted for the pick.[6] He reported to the Royals' Arizona League complex before joining the Idaho Falls Chukars of the Rookie-level Pioneer League.[4] He was promoted to the Lexington Legends of the Class A South Atlantic League in August. In 69 games between Idaho Falls and Lexington, he batted .308 with seven home runs and 52 RBIs.

Dozier began the 2014 season with the Wilmington Blue Rocks of the Class A-Advanced Carolina League. On June 18, the Royals promoted him to the Northwest Arkansas Naturals of the Class AA Texas League.[7][8] In 130 games between the two clubs he hit .251 with eight home runs and 60 RBIs. Dozier spent the 2015 season with Northwest Arkansas, compiling a .213 batting average with 12 home runs and 53 RBIs in 128 games.. He returned there to begin the 2016 season before receiving a promotion to the Omaha Storm Chasers of the Class AAA Pacific Coast League in May.[9] Dozier appeared in the 2016 All-Star Futures Game.[10] In 129 games between Northwest Arkansas and Omaha, he slashed .296/.366/.533 with 23 home runs and 75 RBIs.[11]

The Royals promoted Dozier to the major leagues on September 2, 2016.[12] He made his major league debut on September 12.[13] He recorded his first major league hit on September 16.[14] Dozier began the 2017 season with Omaha. He missed the beginning of the season with a strained oblique muscle, and after playing in ten games, broke the hamate bone in his wrist in June.[15] He played a total of 33 games in the minor league regular season, and was not called up to the major leagues as a part of their September call-ups.[16] After the regular season, he played for the Naranjeros de Hermosillo in the Mexican Pacific League.[17]

Dozier began 2018 with Omaha and was recalled by Kansas City on May 14.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Muench, Matthew (May 8, 2010). "Dozier headed to SFA on baseball scholarship". dallasnews.com. Retrieved June 25, 2014. 
  2. ^ Muench, Matthew (August 20, 2009). "Football: New and improved Denton Broncos: DHS expects progress with more experience". dallasnews.com. Retrieved June 25, 2014. 
  3. ^ "Passing on pitcher, Royals select SS Dozier at No. 8". MLB.com. June 6, 2013. Retrieved June 25, 2014. 
  4. ^ a b "Royals ink deal with No. 1 Draft pick Dozier". MLB.com. May 24, 2013. Retrieved June 12, 2013. 
  5. ^ "SFA's Dozier Named Finalist for Brooks Wallace Award". Southland Conference. Archived from the original on August 14, 2013. Retrieved July 28, 2013. 
  6. ^ "Kansas City Royals sign first-round pick Hunter Dozier". ESPN.com. June 10, 2013. Retrieved June 12, 2013. 
  7. ^ Kaegel, Dick (June 18, 2014). "Royals prospect Dozier advances to Double-A". MLB.com. Retrieved June 25, 2014. 
  8. ^ Grathoff, Pete (June 21, 2014). "Defense of Kansas City Royals' prospect Hunter Dozier impresses his former manager". The Kansas City Star. Retrieved June 25, 2014. 
  9. ^ Dykstra, Sam (May 20, 2016). "Toolshed: Dozier undaunted by Triple-A: Royals No. 15 prospect promoted from Texas League after corrections". MiLB.com. Retrieved July 11, 2016. 
  10. ^ Dodd, Rustin (July 10, 2016). "MLB Futures Game: Royals' Hunter Dozier has rehabilitated his prospect stock with breakout season". The Kansas City Star. Retrieved July 11, 2016. 
  11. ^ "Hunter Dozier Stats, Highlights, Bio - MiLB.com Stats - The Official Site of Minor League Baseball". MiLB.com. Retrieved June 22, 2018. 
  12. ^ Boone, Tony (September 2, 2016). "Promotion to Royals a 'dream come true' for Hunter Dozier". Omaha World-Herald. Retrieved September 2, 2016. 
  13. ^ RUSTIN DODDrdodd@kcstar.com (September 12, 2016). "Rookie Hunter Dozier finally makes his big-league debut for Royals | The Kansas City Star". Kansascity.com. Retrieved November 6, 2017. 
  14. ^ Doddrdodd, Rustin (September 16, 2016). "Watch Kansas City Royals rookie Hunter Dozier's first hit | The Kansas City Star". Kansascity.com. Retrieved November 6, 2017. 
  15. ^ Doddrdodd, Rustin (June 11, 2017). "Royals' Hunter Dozier on the disabled list with broken wrist | The Kansas City Star". Kansascity.com. Retrieved November 6, 2017. 
  16. ^ Dodd, Rustin (September 18, 2017). "KC Royals Q&A: 2018 rotation, Hunter Dozier, Jarrod Dyson | The Kansas City Star". Kansascity.com. Retrieved November 6, 2017. 
  17. ^ Torres, Maria (October 18, 2017). "Where KC Royals are playing winter ball 2017-18 | The Kansas City Star". Kansascity.com. Retrieved November 6, 2017. 

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