List of Major League Baseball All-Star Game venues

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The first All-Star Game was held as part of the 1933 World's Fair at Comiskey Park and was the brainchild of Arch Ward, then sports editor for the Chicago Tribune.[1] Initially intended to be a one-time event, its great success resulted in making the game an annual event, with some years (1959–1962) having two All-Star Games.

Venue selection[edit]

The venue for each All-Star Game is chosen by an MLB selection committee. This choice may be made to commemorate a particular historical occasion, the opening of a new ballpark, or a significant milestone. The criteria for choosing the venue are subjective; for the most part, cities with new parks and cities who have not hosted the game in a long time – or ever – tend to be favored. The venues among the major league franchises: between 1964 and 2015, five teams hosted 3 times, 13 teams twice, ten teams once, and two teams not at all. The "home team" is the league in which the host franchise plays its games. Through the 2018 season, the American League has hosted 43 times, and the National League has hosted 46 times. Traditionally, the game's venue alternated between the two leagues from year to year with six exceptions:

  • 1950–1951 (American League)
  • 1952–1953 (National League)
  • 1959 both games (National League)
  • 1960 both games (American League)
  • 1961 second game – 1962 (American League)
  • 2006–2007 (National League)

This tradition was discontinued after the 2015 game.

As of 2018, one Major League Baseball franchise has never hosted an All-Star Game: the Tampa Bay Rays. The Miami Marlins hosted for the first time in 2017 following the 2012 opening of Marlins Park, although Miami was initially scheduled to host in 2000, MLB eventually moved the game to Atlanta. All-Star games have been played in D.C., hosted by both incarnations of the Washington Senators (now known as the Minnesota Twins and as the Texas Rangers), as well as by the Washington Nationals in 2018.

Of the remaining 27 franchises, the New York Mets had gone the longest period without hosting since their sole hosting duty in 1964, but this streak came to an end at 49 years in 2013. During that span, 18 of the remaining 25 teams have hosted an All-Star Game at least twice since 1964: Atlanta Braves (1972 and 2000), Chicago White Sox (1983 and 2003), Cincinnati Reds (1970, 1988, and 2015), Cleveland Indians (1981, 1997, 2019), Detroit Tigers (1971 and 2005), Houston Astros (1968, 1986, and 2004), Kansas City Royals (1973 and 2012), Los Angeles Angels (1967, 1989, and 2010), Milwaukee Brewers (1975 and 2002), Minnesota Twins (1965, 1985, and 2014), New York Yankees (1977 and 2008), Philadelphia Phillies (1976 and 1996), Pittsburgh Pirates (1974, 1994, and 2006), San Diego Padres (1978, 1992, and 2016), San Francisco Giants (1984 and 2007), Seattle Mariners (1979 and 2001), St. Louis Cardinals (1966 and 2009), and Washington Senators/Texas Rangers (1969 and 1995). The Dodgers are now the team with the longest active hosting drought, since 1980. But this will change in 2020 when the Dodgers host again, which will then pass the record to the Oakland Athletics who have not hosted since 1987.

New stadiums that have not hosted the All-Star Game in cities that have hosted it previously are: Citizens Bank Park in Philadelphia, the new Yankee Stadium in New York City, and SunTrust Park in Atlanta.

Future All-Star Games will be played at Progressive Field in 2019, and at Dodger Stadium in 2020.

Following the game at the first Yankee Stadium in 2008 in its final season, the Bronx's old stadium joined Cleveland's old Cleveland Stadium (also known as Municipal Stadium prior to its own demolition) as the only venues that have hosted four Major League Baseball All-Star games. New York City has hosted it more than any other city, having done so nine times in five different stadiums; after 2017, Tampa Bay will remain the only major league city since the first All-Star Game in 1933 to never have hosted.

List of hosts[edit]

Date City Stadium Host team Attendance Host League
July 6, 1933 Chicago Comiskey Park Chicago White Sox 49,200 American
July 10, 1934 New York City Polo Grounds New York Giants 48,363 National
July 8, 1935 Cleveland Cleveland Stadium Cleveland Indians 69,812 American
July 7, 1936 Boston Braves Field Boston Bees 25,556 National
July 7, 1937 Washington, D.C. Griffith Stadium Washington Senators 31,391 American
July 6, 1938 Cincinnati Crosley Field Cincinnati Reds 27,067 National
July 11, 1939 New York City (2) Yankee Stadium New York Yankees 62,892 American
July 9, 1940 St. Louis Sportsman's Park St. Louis Cardinals 32,373 National
July 8, 1941 Detroit Briggs Stadium Detroit Tigers 54,674 American
July 6, 1942 New York City (3) Polo Grounds (2) New York Giants (2) 34,178 National
July 13, 1943 Philadelphia Shibe Park Philadelphia Athletics 31,938 American
July 11, 1944 Pittsburgh Forbes Field Pittsburgh Pirates 29,589 National
1945 Not held because of World War II
July 9, 1946 Boston (2) Fenway Park Boston Red Sox 34,906 American
July 8, 1947 Chicago (2) Wrigley Field Chicago Cubs 41,123 National
July 13, 1948 St. Louis (2) Sportsman's Park (2) St. Louis Browns 34,009 American
July 12, 1949 New York City (4) Ebbets Field Brooklyn Dodgers 32,577 National
July 11, 1950 Chicago (3) Comiskey Park (2) Chicago White Sox (2) 46,127 American
July 10, 1951 Detroit (2) Briggs Stadium (2) Detroit Tigers (2) 52,075 American
July 8, 1952 Philadelphia (2) Shibe Park (2) Philadelphia Phillies 32,785 National
July 14, 1953 Cincinnati (2) Crosley Field (2) Cincinnati Redlegs 30,846 National
July 13, 1954 Cleveland (2) Cleveland Stadium (2) Cleveland Indians (2) 69,751 American
July 12, 1955 Milwaukee County Stadium Milwaukee Braves 45,643 National
July 10, 1956 Washington, D.C. (2) Griffith Stadium (2) Washington Senators (2) 28,843 American
July 9, 1957 St. Louis (3) Busch Stadium St. Louis Cardinals (2) 30,693 National
July 8, 1958 Baltimore Memorial Stadium Baltimore Orioles 48,829 American
July 7, 1959 Pittsburgh (2) Forbes Field (2) Pittsburgh Pirates (2) 35,277 National
August 3, 1959 Los Angeles Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum Los Angeles Dodgers 55,105 National
July 11, 1960 Kansas City Municipal Stadium Kansas City Athletics 30,619 American
July 13, 1960 New York City (5) Yankee Stadium (2) New York Yankees (2) 38,362 American
July 11, 1961 San Francisco Candlestick Park San Francisco Giants 44,115 National
July 31, 1961 Boston (3) Fenway Park (2) Boston Red Sox (2) 31,851 American
July 10, 1962 Washington, D.C. (3) D.C. Stadium Washington Senators 45,480 American
July 30, 1962 Chicago (4) Wrigley Field (2) Chicago Cubs (2) 38,359 National
July 9, 1963 Cleveland (3) Cleveland Stadium (3) Cleveland Indians (3) 44,160 American
July 7, 1964 New York City (6) Shea Stadium New York Mets 50,850 National
July 13, 1965 Bloomington Metropolitan Stadium Minnesota Twins 46,706 American
July 12, 1966 St. Louis (4) Busch Memorial Stadium St. Louis Cardinals (3) 49,936 National
July 11, 1967 Anaheim Anaheim Stadium California Angels 46,309 American
July 9, 1968 Houston Astrodome Houston Astros 48,321 National
July 23, 1969 Washington, D.C. (4) RFK Stadium Washington Senators (2) 45,259 American
July 14, 1970 Cincinnati (3) Riverfront Stadium Cincinnati Reds (2) 51,838 National
July 13, 1971 Detroit (3) Tiger Stadium Detroit Tigers (3) 53,559 American
July 25, 1972 Atlanta Atlanta Stadium Atlanta Braves 53,107 National
July 24, 1973 Kansas City (2) Royals Stadium Kansas City Royals 40,849 American
July 23, 1974 Pittsburgh (3) Three Rivers Stadium Pittsburgh Pirates (3) 50,706 National
July 15, 1975 Milwaukee (2) County Stadium (2) Milwaukee Brewers 51,480 American
July 13, 1976 Philadelphia (3) Veterans Stadium Philadelphia Phillies (2) 63,974 National
July 19, 1977 New York City (7) Yankee Stadium (3) New York Yankees (3) 56,683 American
July 11, 1978 San Diego San Diego Stadium San Diego Padres 51,549 National
July 17, 1979 Seattle Kingdome Seattle Mariners 58,905 American
July 8, 1980 Los Angeles (2) Dodger Stadium Los Angeles Dodgers (2) 56,088 National
August 9, 1981 Cleveland (4) Cleveland Stadium (4) Cleveland Indians (4) 72,086 American
July 13, 1982 Montreal Olympic Stadium Montreal Expos 59,057 National
July 6, 1983 Chicago (5) Comiskey Park (3) Chicago White Sox (3) 43,801 American
July 10, 1984 San Francisco (2) Candlestick Park (2) San Francisco Giants (2) 57,756 National
July 16, 1985 Minneapolis Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome Minnesota Twins (2) 54,960 American
July 15, 1986 Houston (2) Astrodome (2) Houston Astros (2) 45,774 National
July 14, 1987 Oakland Oakland–Alameda County Coliseum Oakland Athletics 49,671 American
July 12, 1988 Cincinnati (4) Riverfront Stadium (2) Cincinnati Reds (3) 55,837 National
July 11, 1989 Anaheim (2) Anaheim Stadium (2) California Angels (2) 64,036 American
July 10, 1990 Chicago (6) Wrigley Field (3) Chicago Cubs (3) 39,071 National
July 9, 1991 Toronto SkyDome Toronto Blue Jays 52,383 American
July 14, 1992 San Diego (2) Jack Murphy Stadium (2) San Diego Padres (2) 59,372 National
July 13, 1993 Baltimore (2) Oriole Park at Camden Yards Baltimore Orioles (2) 48,147 American
July 12, 1994 Pittsburgh (4) Three Rivers Stadium (2) Pittsburgh Pirates (4) 59,568 National
July 11, 1995 Arlington The Ballpark in Arlington Texas Rangers 50,920 American
July 9, 1996 Philadelphia (4) Veterans Stadium (2) Philadelphia Phillies (3) 62,670 National
July 8, 1997 Cleveland (5) Jacobs Field Cleveland Indians (5) 44,916 American
July 7, 1998 Denver Coors Field Colorado Rockies 51,267 National
July 13, 1999 Boston (4) Fenway Park (3) Boston Red Sox (3) 34,187 American
July 11, 2000 Atlanta (2) Turner Field Atlanta Braves (2) 51,323 National
July 10, 2001 Seattle (2) Safeco Field Seattle Mariners (2) 47,364 American
July 9, 2002 Milwaukee (3) Miller Park Milwaukee Brewers (2) 41,871 National
July 15, 2003 Chicago (7) U.S. Cellular Field Chicago White Sox (4) 47,609 American
July 13, 2004 Houston (3) Minute Maid Park Houston Astros (3) 41,886 National
July 12, 2005 Detroit (4) Comerica Park Detroit Tigers (4) 41,617 American
July 11, 2006 Pittsburgh (5) PNC Park Pittsburgh Pirates (5) 38,904 National
July 10, 2007 San Francisco (3) AT&T Park San Francisco Giants (3) 43,965 National
July 15, 2008 New York City (8) Yankee Stadium (4) New York Yankees (4) 55,632 American
July 14, 2009 St. Louis (5) Busch Stadium St. Louis Cardinals (4) 46,760 National
July 13, 2010 Anaheim (3) Angel Stadium of Anaheim (3) Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim 45,408 American
July 12, 2011 Phoenix Chase Field Arizona Diamondbacks 49,033 National
July 10, 2012 Kansas City (3) Kauffman Stadium (2) Kansas City Royals (2) 40,933 American
July 16, 2013 New York City (9) Citi Field New York Mets (2) 45,186 National
July 15, 2014 Minneapolis (2) Target Field Minnesota Twins (3) 41,048 American
July 14, 2015 Cincinnati (5) Great American Ball Park Cincinnati Reds (4) 43,656 National
July 12, 2016 San Diego (3) Petco Park San Diego Padres (3) 42,386 National
July 11, 2017 Miami Marlins Park Miami Marlins 37,188 National
July 17, 2018 Washington, D.C. (5) Nationals Park Washington Nationals 43,843 National
July 9, 2019 Cleveland (6) Progressive Field (2) Cleveland Indians (6) American
July 14, 2020 Los Angeles (3) Dodger Stadium (2) Los Angeles Dodgers (3) National
July 13, 2021

Various statistics[edit]

Times hosted by city[edit]

City Times Hosted Years
New York City 9 1934, 1939, 1942, 1949, 1960, 1964, 1977, 2008, 2013
Chicago 7 1933, 1947, 1950, 1962, 1983, 1990, 2003
Cleveland 6 1935, 1954, 1963, 1981, 1997, 2019
Pittsburgh 5 1944, 1959, 1974, 1994, 2006
St. Louis 5 1940, 1948, 1957, 1966, 2009
Cincinnati 5 1938, 1953, 1970, 1988, 2015
Washington, D.C. 5 1937, 1956, 1962, 1969, 2018
Boston 4 1936, 1946, 1961, 1999
Detroit 4 1941, 1951, 1971, 2005
Philadelphia 4 1943, 1952, 1976, 1996
Kansas City 3 1960, 1973, 2012
Milwaukee 3 1955, 1975, 2002
San Diego 3 1978, 1992, 2016
San Francisco 3 1961, 1984, 2007
Houston 3 1968, 1986, 2004
Anaheim 3 1967, 1989, 2010
Minneapolis 3 1965, 1985, 2014
Baltimore 2 1958, 1993
Los Angeles 3 1959, 1980, 2020
Atlanta 2 1972, 2000
Seattle 2 1979, 2001
Montreal 1 1982
Oakland 1 1987
Toronto 1 1991
Arlington 1 1995
Denver 1 1998
Phoenix 1 2011
Miami 1 2017
St. Petersburg 0 --

Times hosted by club[edit]

Club Times Hosted Years
Cleveland Indians 6 1935, 1954, 1963, 1981, 1997, 2019
New York/San Francisco Giants 5 1934, 1942, 1961, 1984, 2007
Washington Senators/Minnesota Twins 5 1937, 1956, 1965, 1985, 2014
Cincinnati Reds/Redlegs 5 1938, 1953, 1970, 1988, 2015
Pittsburgh Pirates 5 1944, 1959, 1974, 1994, 2006
Chicago White Sox 4 1933, 1950, 1983, 2003
Boston Bees/Milwaukee/Atlanta Braves 4 1936, 1955, 1972, 2000
New York Yankees 4 1939, 1960, 1977, 2008
St. Louis Cardinals 4 1940, 1957, 1966, 2009
Detroit Tigers 4 1941, 1951, 1971, 2005
Philadelphia/Kansas City/Oakland Athletics 3 1943, 1960, 1987
Boston Red Sox 3 1946, 1961, 1999
Chicago Cubs 3 1947, 1962, 1990
St. Louis Browns/Baltimore Orioles 3 1948, 1958, 1993
Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers 3 1949, 1959, 1980, 2020
Philadelphia Phillies 3 1952, 1976, 1996
Washington Senators/Texas Rangers 3 1962, 1969, 1995
California/Los Angeles Angels 3 1967, 1989, 2010
Houston Astros 3 1968, 1986, 2004
San Diego Padres 3 1978, 1992, 2016
New York Mets 2 1964, 2013
Kansas City Royals 2 1973, 2012
Milwaukee Brewers 2 1975, 2002
Seattle Mariners 2 1979, 2001
Montreal Expos/Washington Nationals 2 1982, 2018
Toronto Blue Jays 1 1991
Colorado Rockies 1 1998
Arizona Diamondbacks 1 2011
Miami Marlins 1 2017
Tampa Bay Rays 0

Ballparks that have hosted more than one All-Star Game[edit]

Active baseball parks[edit]

Progressive Field and Dodger Stadium will join this list in 2019 and 2020, respectively.

Discontinued baseball parks[edit]

The only discontinued ballparks that hosted one All-Star Game are: Ebbets Field in 1949, Memorial Stadium in 1958, Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in 1959, Shea Stadium in 1964, Metropolitan Stadium in 1965, Busch Memorial Stadium in 1966, Fulton County Stadium in 1972, the Kingdome in 1979, Olympic Stadium (Montreal) in 1982, Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome in 1985, and Turner Field in 2000.

Ballparks that have never hosted an All-Star Game[edit]

Active baseball parks (oldest parks listed first)[edit]

  • Tropicana Field, opened in 1990; the Rays have played there since 1998.
  • Citizens Bank Park, opened in 2004; the Phillies last hosted the ASG in 1996 in Veterans Stadium.
  • Yankee Stadium (New), opened in 2009; the Yankees last hosted the ASG in 2008 at the previous park.
  • SunTrust Park, opened in 2017 and will host in 2021; the Braves last hosted the ASG in 2000 in Turner Field.

Discontinued baseball parks (oldest parks listed first)[edit]

A * indicates that the stadium was a temporary facility, used in the short term by a team awaiting the construction of a larger, permanent home park.

The last time each franchise has hosted an All-Star Game[edit]

from least recent to most recent

Hosting All-Star Game and post-season games in same season[edit]

The following teams have hosted the All-Star Game in the summer then proceeded to host post-season games in the fall:


League Championship Series play began 1969

  • 1970: Cincinnati Reds – lost World Series – also first season for Riverfront Stadium
  • 1974: Pittsburgh Pirates – lost NLCS
  • 1976: Philadelphia Phillies – lost NLCS
  • 1977: New York Yankees – won World Series
  • 1983: Chicago White Sox – lost ALCS
  • 1986: Houston Astros – lost NLCS
  • 1991: Toronto Blue Jays – lost ALCS

Division Series play began 1995

  • 1997: Cleveland Indians – lost World Series
  • 1999: Boston Red Sox – lost ALCS
  • 2000: Atlanta Braves – lost NLDS
  • 2001: Seattle Mariners – lost ALCS
  • 2004: Houston Astros – lost NLCS
  • 2009: St. Louis Cardinals – lost NLDS
  • 2011: Arizona Diamondbacks – lost NLDS

References[edit]