List of black holes

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This is a list of black holes (and stars considered probable candidates) organized by size (including black holes of undetermined mass); some items in this list are galaxies or star clusters that are believed to be organized around a black hole. Messier and New General Catalogue designations are given where possible.

Supermassive black holes and candidates[edit]

Types[edit]

Intermediate-mass black holes and candidates[edit]

Stellar black holes and candidates[edit]

Black holes detected by gravitational wave signals[edit]

  • The black holes involved in the binary black hole merger that produced the gravitational wave signal GW150914.[7] Note that this detection confirmed the (former) existence of 3 black holes: the two original black holes with masses of 29 and 32 solar masses that merged to form one heavier black hole with a mass of 62 solar masses.
  • The black holes involved in the binary black hole merger that produced the gravitational wave signal GW151226.[8] Note that, as for GW150914, this detection confirmed the existence of three black holes: two initial black holes of mass 14 and 8 solar masses that merged into a new, more massive black hole of 21 solar masses.
  • The black holes involved in the binary black hole merger that produced the gravitational wave signal GW170104.
  • The black holes involved in the binary black hole merger that produced the gravitational wave signal GW170608.[9]
  • The black holes involved in the binary black hole merger that produced the gravitational wave signal GW170814.

Multiple black hole systems[edit]

Binary black holes[edit]

In addition, the signal of several binary black holes merging into a single black hole and in so doing producing gravitational waves have been observed by the LIGO instrument. These are listed above in the section Black holes detected by gravitational wave signals.

Trinary black holes[edit]

As of 2014, there are 5 triple black hole systems known.[13]

list

References[edit]

  1. ^ M87's satellite galaxy NGC 4486B, SEDS
  2. ^ Burke, Mark J.; Raychaudhury, Somak; Kraft, Ralph P.; Brassington, Nicola J.; Hardcastle, Martin J.; Goodger, Joanna L.; Sivakoff, Gregory R.; Forman, William R.; Jones, Christine; Woodley, Kristin A.; Murray, Stephen S.; Kainulainen, Jouni; Birkinshaw, Mark; Croston, Judith H.; Evans, Daniel A.; Gilfanov, Marat; Jordán, Andrés; Sarazin, Craig L.; Voss, Rasmus; Worrall, Diana M.; Zhang, Zhongli (2012). "A Transient Sub-Eddington Black Hole X-Ray Binary Candidate in the Dust Lanes of Centaurus A". The Astrophysical Journal. 749. arXiv:1202.3149Freely accessible. Bibcode:2012ApJ...749..112B. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/749/2/112. 
  3. ^ a b Andrea Thompson (1 April 2008). "Smallest Black Hole Found". Space.com. 
  4. ^ Knapp, Alex (2012-02-22). "The Smallest Known Black Hole Has 20 Million Mile Per Hour Winds". Forbes. Forbes.com LLC. Retrieved 2012-02-22. 
  5. ^ NASA.gov, "NASA's RXTE Detects 'Heartbeat' of Smallest Black Hole Candidate", 2011.12.15 (accessed 2011.12.17)
  6. ^ ScienceDaily, "Heaviest Stellar Black Hole Discovered In Nearby Galaxy", Oct. 18, 2007 (accessed 12-12-2009)
  7. ^ Abbott, Benjamin P.; et al. (LIGO Scientific Collaboration and Virgo Collaboration) (2016). "Observation of Gravitational Waves from a Binary Black Hole Merger". Phys. Rev. Lett. 116 (6): 061102. arXiv:1602.03837Freely accessible. Bibcode:2016PhRvL.116f1102A. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.061102. PMID 26918975. 
  8. ^ Abbott, Benjamin P.; et al. (LIGO Scientific Collaboration and Virgo Collaboration) (2016). "GW151226: Observation of Gravitational Waves from a 22-Solar-Mass Binary Black Hole Coalescence". Phys. Rev. Lett. 116: 241103. arXiv:1606.04855Freely accessible. Bibcode:2016PhRvL.116x1103A. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.241103. PMID 27367379. 
  9. ^ Abbott, B. P.; et al. (LIGO Scientific Collaboration and Virgo Collaboration) (16 November 2017). "GW170608: Observation of a 19-Solar-Mass binary black hole coalescence". arXiv:1711.05578Freely accessible. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.221101. 
  10. ^ ESA (25 April 2014). "Unique pair of hidden black holes discovered by XMM-Newton". Space Daily. 
  11. ^ Xaq Rzetelny (8 January 2015). "Supermassive black hole binary discovered". 
  12. ^ Matthew J. Graham; S. George Djorgovski; Daniel Stern; Eilat Glikman; Andrew J. Drake; Ashish A. Mahabal; et al. (25 July 2014). "A possible close supermassive black-hole binary in a quasar with optical periodicity". Nature (published 7 January 2015). 518: 74–76. arXiv:1501.01375Freely accessible. Bibcode:2015Natur.518...74G. doi:10.1038/nature14143. ISSN 0028-0836. PMID 25561176. 
  13. ^ a b Deane, R. P.; Paragi, Z.; Jarvis, M. J.; Coriat, M.; Bernardi, G.; Fender, R. P.; et al. (24 June 2014). "A close-pair binary in a distant triple supermassive black hole system". Nature (published July 2014). 511 (7507): 57–60. arXiv:1406.6365Freely accessible. Bibcode:2014Natur.511...57D. doi:10.1038/nature13454. PMID 24990745. 
  14. ^ Schawinski, Kevin; Urry, Meg; Treister, Ezequiel; Simmons, Brooke; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Glikman, Eilat (29 November 2011). "Evidence for Three Accreting Black Holes in a Galaxy at z ~ 1.35: A Snapshot of Recently Formed Black Hole Seeds?". The Astrophysical Journal Letters (published December 2011). 743 (2): 6. arXiv:1111.6973Freely accessible. Bibcode:2011ApJ...743L..37S. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/743/2/L37. L37. 
  15. ^ Liu, Xin; Shen, Yue; Strauss, Michael A. (18 April 2011). "Cosmic Train Wreck by Massive Black Holes: Discovery of a Kiloparsec-scale Triple Active Galactic Nucleus". The Astrophysical Journal Letters (published July 2011). 736 (1): 5. arXiv:1104.3391Freely accessible. Bibcode:2011ApJ...736L...7L. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/736/1/L7. L7. 

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